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What is the most elegant and simple way to implement a circular list, FIFO style? I'm looking for a solution that doesn't resort to hacks like catching exceptions.

No, this is not for homework.

For a little background, I want to use a circular list within GWT; so using a 3rd party lib is not what I want.

Edit: In order to clarify, I referred to FIFO because I basically need a cache. Instead of expiring by oldest/youngest/whatsoever, I thought on evicting the first inserted element, but a circular list already gives me that :) So ignore the FIFO stuff.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 25 down vote accepted

A very simple implementation, expressed in C. Implements a circular buffer style FIFO queue. Could be made more generic by creating a structure containing the queue size, queue data, and queue indexes (in and out), which would be passed in with the data to add or remove from the queue. These same routines could then handle several queues. Also note that this allows queues of any size, although speedups can be used if you use powers of 2 and customize the code further.

/* Very simple queue
 * These are FIFO queues which discard the new data when full.
 *
 * Queue is empty when in == out.
 * If in != out, then 
 *  - items are placed into in before incrementing in
 *  - items are removed from out before incrementing out
 * Queue is full when in == (out-1 + QUEUE_SIZE) % QUEUE_SIZE;
 *
 * The queue will hold QUEUE_ELEMENTS number of items before the
 * calls to QueuePut fail.
 */

/* Queue structure */
#define QUEUE_ELEMENTS 100
#define QUEUE_SIZE (QUEUE_ELEMENTS + 1)
int Queue[QUEUE_SIZE];
int QueueIn, QueueOut;

void QueueInit(void)
{
    QueueIn = QueueOut = 0;
}

int QueuePut(int new)
{
    if(QueueIn == (( QueueOut - 1 + QUEUE_SIZE) % QUEUE_SIZE))
    {
        return -1; /* Queue Full*/
    }

    Queue[QueueIn] = new;

    QueueIn = (QueueIn + 1) % QUEUE_SIZE;

    return 0; // No errors
}

int QueueGet(int *old)
{
    if(QueueIn == QueueOut)
    {
        return -1; /* Queue Empty - nothing to get*/
    }

    *old = Queue[QueueOut];

    QueueOut = (QueueOut + 1) % QUEUE_SIZE;

    return 0; // No errors
}
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1  
Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't this allow you to store only 99 entries? The expression (in == (out-1+SIZE)%SIZE) says if in is one before out. But in has not been written yet, so the 100th spot is never written to. –  Jonathon Reinhart Sep 27 '10 at 4:20
    
@Jonathon - That's correct, and while it's obvious enough to experts, this is aimed at beginners, so I've modified the code to make that more explicit. Thanks for the note! –  Adam Davis Oct 9 '10 at 16:07
3  
@RocketRoy the code is correct. It trades off a single space in the buffer for a simpler empty/full test. –  Adam Davis Dec 29 '12 at 4:09
1  
@AdamDavis Code being unintuitive is not the same as being incorrect. This implementation has the stated number of QUEUE_ELEMENTS and generates correct results on all edge cases, as well as having fewer bookkeeping variables than your implementation. Simple and effective. –  Chase Sandmann Feb 17 '14 at 4:54
1  
@RocketRoy I disagree with you. While there are other ways to implement a circular list with FIFO features, this code is not incorrect, and it does work. It does leave a hole that crawls backward through the buffer, but that is by design, and is a very time/processing efficient way to implement a FIFO. I've also briefly reviewed the code you suggest is better, and disagree on that point as well, but it appears others have left comments there that make many of the points I'd make. The implementation I've provided in this answer is not perfect, but it is simple, understandable, and it works. –  Adam Davis Feb 17 '14 at 17:23

FIFO is a property of queues, not circular lists.

Circular lists doesn't have a tail (where new nodes will enter) nor header (where the nodes will be removed) sistematicaly.

Can you give more information about it?

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1  
He means a Ring Buffer. –  DJClayworth Feb 10 '11 at 17:57

If you want a fixed length circular list. You can use a (dynamic) array. Use two variables for houskeeping. One for the position of the next element, one to count the number of elements.

Put: put element on free place. move the position (modulo length). Add 1 to the count unless count equals the lengtht of the list. Get: only if count>0. move the position to the left (modulo length). Decrement the count.

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Adam davis has the same suggestion, but he uses a slightly different approach. –  Toon Krijthe Oct 18 '08 at 21:17

Use an array and keep a variable P with the first available position.

Increase P every time you add a new element.

To know the equivalent index of P in your array do (P % n) where n is the size of your array.

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Use a linked list. Maintain separate pointers for the head and tail. Pop from the head of the list, push onto the tail. If you want it circular, just make sure the new tail always points to the head.

I can understand why you might want to implement a FIFO using a linked list, but why make it a circular list?

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I am using this for my microcontroller. For code simplicity one byte will be unfilled. Aka size - 1 is the full capacity actually.

fifo_t* createFifoToHeap(size_t size)
{
    byte_t* buffer = (byte_t*)malloc(size);

    if (buffer == NULL)
        return NULL;

    fifo_t* fifo = (fifo_t*)malloc(sizeof(fifo_t));

    if (fifo == NULL)
    {
       free(buffer);
       return NULL;
    }

    fifo->buffer = buffer;
    fifo->head = 0;
    fifo->tail = 0;
    fifo->size = size;

    return fifo;
}

#define CHECK_FIFO_NULL(fifo) MAC_FUNC(if (fifo == NULL) return 0;)

size_t fifoPushByte(fifo_t* fifo, byte_t byte)
{
    CHECK_FIFO_NULL(fifo);

    if (fifoIsFull(fifo) == true)
       return 0;

    fifo->buffer[fifo->head] = byte;

    fifo->head++;
    if (fifo->head == fifo->size)
       fifo->head = 0;

    return 1;
}

size_t fifoPushBytes(fifo_t* fifo, byte_t* bytes, size_t count)
{
    CHECK_FIFO_NULL(fifo);

    for (uint32_t i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        if (fifoPushByte(fifo, bytes[i]) == 0)
            return i;
    }

    return count;
}

size_t fifoPopByte(fifo_t* fifo, byte_t* byte)
{
    CHECK_FIFO_NULL(fifo);

    if (fifoIsEmpty(fifo) == true)
        return 0;

    *byte = fifo->buffer[fifo->tail];

    fifo->tail++;
    if (fifo->tail == fifo->size)
        fifo->tail = 0;

    return 1;
}

size_t fifoPopBytes(fifo_t* fifo, byte_t* bytes, size_t count)
{
    CHECK_FIFO_NULL(fifo);

    for (uint32_t i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        if (fifoPopByte(fifo, bytes + i) == 0)
            return i;
    }

    return count;
}

bool fifoIsFull(fifo_t* fifo)
{
    if ((fifo->head == (fifo->size - 1) && fifo->tail == 0) || (fifo->head == (fifo->tail - 1)))
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}

bool fifoIsEmpty(fifo_t* fifo)
{
    if (fifo->head == fifo->tail)
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}

size_t fifoBytesFilled(fifo_t* fifo)
{
    if (fifo->head == fifo->tail)
        return 0;
    else if ((fifo->head == (fifo->size - 1) && fifo->tail == 0) || (fifo->head == (fifo->tail - 1)))
        return fifo->size;
    else if (fifo->head < fifo->tail)
        return (fifo->head) + (fifo->size - fifo->tail);
    else
        return fifo->head - fifo->tail; 
}
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I don't think queue is the best way to make a cache. You want to be your cache to be really fast! And doing a linear scan of your queue is not the way to go unless you want your cache to be really small or your memory is really limited.

Assuming that you don't want a very small cache or a slow cache, using a Linked List with a Hash Map of value to node in the linked list is a good way to go. You can always evict the head, and whenever an element is accessed, you can remove it and put it in the head of the list. For accessing you can directly get it or check if it's in the cache in O(1). Evicting an element is also O(1) and so is updating the list.

For an example, look at LinkedHashMap in java.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/LinkedHashMap.html

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