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Is there a more elegant way of doing this in scala?

def doTheDangerousThing(): Try[Result] = {
  val result = Try(dangerousOp)

  if (result.isFailure) {
     println("error")
  }

  result
}
share|improve this question

I think your if statement is perfectly valid. Here is another alternative:

def doTheDangerousThing(): Try[Result] = Try(dangerousOp) recoverWith {
    case exception => println("error"); Failure(exception)
}
share|improve this answer
    
Though valid (mine, that is), it looks a bit imperative. It would be nice to have a variant of recoverWith just for side-effecting, and not having to return Failure again. – Pablo Fernandez Feb 4 '14 at 19:43
    
@PabloFernandez agreed. I guess a foreach method designed for Failure could be useful. You can write your own with implicit conversion. – vptheron Feb 4 '14 at 20:34

Not sure if this is more idiomatic, but sometimes I find that placing the recoverWith in this manner improves readability for me:

def doDangerousThing(): Try[Result] = Try {
  dangerousOp
} recoverWith {
  case t: Throwable => println("error"); Failure(t)
}
share|improve this answer

Something like this:

   def doTheDangerousThing[Result](dangerousOp: =>Result): Try[Result] = Try(dangerousOp) match {
    case o @ Failure(_) =>  println("error"); o
    case _ => _
  }
share|improve this answer

There are ways. For instance:

def doTheDangerousThing(): Try[Result] = {
  val result = Try(dangerousOp)

  result.failed foreach { _ =>
     println("error")
  }

  result
}

Or, if you don't want to repeat result all through, then:

def doTheDangerousThing(): Try[Result] = {
  Try(dangerousOp) recover {
    case ex => println("error"); throw ex
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Well, I suppose you could do something like this:

def doTheDangerousThing(): Option[Result] = 
  Try(dangerousOp) match {
    case Success(result) => Some(result)
    case Failure(e) => None //might want to log the error as well
  }
share|improve this answer
2  
How is this code a replacement for the snippet in the question? What's the point of changing the return type? I think Pablo was just interested in replacing the if statement. – vptheron Feb 4 '14 at 15:46
    
There is already toOption method in Try. And yes, it's not an answer. – senia Feb 4 '14 at 15:48
    
This changes the return type and loses the Exception – Pablo Fernandez Feb 4 '14 at 15:51
    
This is how I would do this. Deal with the exception here, instead of passing the Try up. I hinted at this in the solution... add some code to log and/or deal with the exception in the case Failure(e) -- in which case it's superior to just using toOption. – James Adam Feb 4 '14 at 16:04
    
I'll also add, I changed the return type because I'm dubious on the merit of examining the value within the Try in one place, and then returning the Try.. presumably so that it will be examined again somewhere else. Are you going to have exception-handling code in two places? – James Adam Feb 4 '14 at 16:26

I could choose from either of the three implementations, depending on whether I want to:

  • Simply propagate it upwards ( doTheDangerousThing1 )
  • Ignore the error ( doTheDangerousThing2 )
  • Intercept the error while propagating it upwards ( doTheDangerousThing3 )

Here is the code:

import scala.util.{Try,Success,Failure}
object temp {
  type Result = Int

  def dangerousOp = {
    val r = scala.util.Random.nextInt(10)
    if (r > 5) r else throw new RuntimeException("Failed on " + r)
  }
  def logMessage[T](t: T) = println(t)

  def doTheDangerousThing1(): Try[Result] = Try(dangerousOp)

  def doTheDangerousThing2(): Option[Result] = {
    Try(dangerousOp) match {
      case Success(r) => Option(r)
      case _ => None
    }
  }


  def doTheDangerousThing3(): Try[Result] = {
    Try(dangerousOp) match {
      case t @ Success(r) => t
      case t @ _ => logMessage("failed: "+t); t
    }
  }
}

Inside the REPL

scala> doTheDangerousThing1
res0: scala.util.Try[Result] = Success(9)

scala> doTheDangerousThing1
res1: scala.util.Try[Result] = Success(9)

scala> doTheDangerousThing2
res2: Option[Result] = None

scala> doTheDangerousThing2
res3: Option[Result] = Some(7)

scala> doTheDangerousThing3
failed: Failure(java.lang.RuntimeException: Failed on 0)
res4: scala.util.Try[Result] = Failure(java.lang.RuntimeException: Failed on 0)

scala> doTheDangerousThing3
failed: Failure(java.lang.RuntimeException: Failed on 0)
res5: scala.util.Try[Result] = Failure(java.lang.RuntimeException: Failed on 0)
share|improve this answer

My preferred,

def doTheDangerousThing(): Option[Result] = Try (dangerousOp) toOption

If the Try is successful you will get a Some(value), if it fails a None.

For a large compilation on Try uses, have a look at Try introduced in Scala 2.10.0 .

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