Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am trying to generate the below Color Gradient ( the Color is blue at one end, and red at the other).

alt text

I follow the suggestion put forth here. This is my code:

int rMax = Color.Red.R;
int rMin = Color.Blue.R;
// ... and for B, G
var colorList = new List<Color>();
for(int i=0; i<size; i++)
{
    var rAverage = rMin + (int)((rMax - rMin) * i / size);
    // ... and for B, G
    colorList.Add(Color.FromArgb(rAverage, gAverage, bAverage));
}

Although the result I did show a gradual, smooth transition from Red to Blue, but other intermediate color such as yellow and green didn't show up at all.

Anything I did wrong?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should work with colors in the HSL color space, not RGB. That allows you to smoothly change the hue value from 0 (red) to 1 (violet). The System.Drawing.Color structure allows converting from RBG to HSL (GetHue etc) but not the other way. The math is simple though.

share|improve this answer
1  
Check out bobpowell.net/rgbhsb.htm for .NET RGB / HSL conversion code –  AakashM Jan 28 '10 at 16:07
    
...That is exactly what I said. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 28 '10 at 20:13
int rMax = Color.Red.R; 
int rMin = Color.Blue.R; 
// ... and for B, G 
var colorList = new List<Color>(); 
for(int i=0; i<size; i++) 
{ 
    var rAverage = rMin + (int)((rMax - rMin) * i / size); 
    // ... and for B, G 
    colorList.Add(Color.FromArgb(rAverage, gAverage, bAverage)); 
} 

You are setting rMin = 0 and rMax = 255. Thus you are essentially setting

rAverage = 255 * i / size;

You don't have the code for gAverage and bAverage listed, but if it were truly equivalent you'd be seeing a gradual trasition from black->gray->white, with no other hues at all.

It seems likely that what you want is to iterate over the different hues at a constant lightness/saturation. See here for an example C# class which does that, and here for an explanation of the equation.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.