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in bash, I would like to use the command "find" to find files which contain the numbers from 40 to 70 in a certain position like c43_data.txt. How is it possible to implement this filter in find ?

I tried file . -name "c**_data.txt" | grep 4, but this is not very nice

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

ls -R | grep -e 'c[4-7][0-9]_data.txt'

find can be used in place of ls, obviously.

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ok, thanks a lot –  asdf Jan 28 '10 at 15:44
1  
Will this not match files that have 71-79 in them? –  Nick Presta Jan 28 '10 at 15:45
    
Yes, that will match 71-79, and also doesn't give the pathnames of the files. –  Alok Singhal Jan 28 '10 at 15:46
    
by the way, how can one two criterias at the same time? let's say ls -R | grep -e 'c[4-7][0-9]_data.txt' AND ls -R | grep -e 'c[1-2][3- 4]_data.txt' ??? –  asdf Jan 28 '10 at 15:47
    
asdf: grep -e 'c([4-7][0-9]\|[1-2][3-4])_data.txt' Generally: man egrep –  SF. Jan 28 '10 at 16:04

Perhaps something like:

find . -regextype posix-egrep -regex "./c(([4-6][0-9])|70)_data.txt"

This matches 40 - 69, and 70.

You may also use the iregex option for case-insensitive matching.

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No, this won't match 41-49, etc. –  danben Jan 28 '10 at 15:39
    
find . -regex "c[4-7][0-9]_data.txt" - Yours would only match multiples of ten; 40, 50, 60, 70. –  tj111 Jan 28 '10 at 15:40
    
I did not know about the regex flag, thanks –  Alberto Zaccagni Jan 28 '10 at 15:43
    
Thanks. I just woke up and I'm a little groggy, obviously. :-) –  Nick Presta Jan 28 '10 at 15:43
    
regex matches the whole path. if you want to use the alternation , your regextype should change. find . -regextype posix-egrep -regex "./c([4-6][0-9]|70)_data.txt" –  ghostdog74 Jan 28 '10 at 16:05
$ ls
c40_data.txt  c42_data.txt  c44_data.txt  c70_data.txt  c72_data.txt  c74_data.txt
c41_data.txt  c43_data.txt  c45_data.txt  c71_data.txt  c73_data.txt  c75_data.txt

$ find . -type f \( -name "c[4-6][0-9]_*txt" -o -name "c70_*txt" -o -name "c[1-2][3-4]_*.txt" \) -print
./c43_data.txt
./c41_data.txt
./c45_data.txt
./c70_data.txt
./c40_data.txt
./c44_data.txt
./c42_data.txt
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Try something like:

find . -regextype posix-egrep -regex '.\*c([3-6][0-9]|70).\*'

with the appropriate refinements to limit this to the files you want

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