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I would like to write a template function that takes as its arguments two iterators of some STL container, First and Last, and returns an STL container of containing (a copy of) those elements between the two iterators that match some criteria. In other words, I want something like:

template <typename Type>
Type Foo(Type::iterator First, Type::iterator Last)
{
    Type Result;
    for (Type::iterator i = First; i != Last; i++)
    {
        if (...)
        {
           Result.push_back(*i);
        }
    }
    return Result;
}

This however does not compile as the compiler says that "Type::iterator is not a type" (I call it with std::vector<double>).

Am I simply getting the syntax wrong? Or am I doing this completely the wrong way?

Thank you.

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marked as duplicate by Angew, chris, Mike Seymour, lpapp, Soner Gönül Feb 5 '14 at 7:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
1  
So basically you want std::copy_if –  mkaes Feb 4 '14 at 15:55
    
Instead of trying to be clever you might just pass an iterator for the result and use back_inserter. Then the caller gets to choose what kind of container to use for the results. –  Mark Ransom Feb 4 '14 at 16:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try to use

typename Type::iterator
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1  
That's not sufficient. If I create a container class, and typedef vector<double>::iterator iterator;, how will the compiler know whether to use my class, or vector<double> when given a vector<double>::iterator ? –  Benjamin Lindley Feb 4 '14 at 16:10
    
It turns out @Vlad from Moscow was right. The code does work if I add "typename", because the compiler now knows that "Type::iterator" cannot refer to a static member of a class of type "Type". Then I call the function as, e.g. "Foo<std::vector<int> > (X.begin(), X.end());". Thanks to all for the fruitful discussion. –  MGA Feb 4 '14 at 18:00
    
@mga: If you call it like that, then you're not using type deduction for the container. And if you're not going to use type deduction for the container, then why impose the limitation that the iterator type must match the container type? Why not just make the arguments a template type, as in TNA's answer? –  Benjamin Lindley Feb 4 '14 at 19:07
    
@BenjaminLindley Fair point, and thanks for raising it. In my case this solution is good enough, and it's what I was originally looking for. This is why I marked the answer as the correct one. Clearly though you're right that to get type deduction you need to implement something along the lines of Jarod42's answer. –  MGA Feb 5 '14 at 14:04

With:

template <typename Type>
Type Foo(typename Type::iterator First, typename Type::iterator Last)

You cannot deduce Type (and there may have several possibilities anyway).
(You have to call it this way Foo<Container>(first, last))

You may create a type traits to do the job; something like:

template <typename T> struct get_container;

template <typename T*>
struct get_container<T*>
{
    typedef std::vector<T> type;
};

template <typename T>
struct get_container<std::list<T>::iterator>
{
    typedef std::list<T> type;
};

// And so on: care of possible conflict.

And then you have:

template <typename It>
typename get_container<It>::type Foo(It First, It Last)
{
    typename get_container<It>::type Result;
    for (It it = First; it != Last; ++it) {
        if (...) {
           Result.push_back(*it);
        }
    }
    return Result;
}
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template <typename Container, typename InputIterator>
Container Foo(InputIterator First, InputIterator Last)
{
  using namespace std;
  Container Result;
  copy_if(First,Last, back_inserter(Result),pred)
  return Result;
}
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