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I need help with a simple C# program. Simpley yet I don't know the solution. The problem is here: I need to loop (or print on the screen) all numbers in this order: 2, -3, 4, -5, 6, -7, etc. until they reach 100. Do you have any ideas how to do that? For now I've done something like that:

for (int i = -2; i <= 100; i += 1)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(i);
        }

But I can't get it to work like the order I want, I know I'm doing something wrong in the i += 1 section but I can't figure out how to do that! Thank you for your support.

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5  
Sounds like homework. –  Haney Feb 4 '14 at 16:21
3  
Think a bit. It's really very simple. –  Michael Walz Feb 4 '14 at 16:21
1  
Solution without code: Instead of counting from -2 to 100, count from 2 to 100 and alter the sign you print to the console on each iteration. –  Vache Feb 4 '14 at 16:22
1  
I wouldn't say there is anything wrong about i += 1 (even though it could be equivalently written as i++). However, please consider that you do not need to print exactly the value of i; you can use i for counting and print something computed based on i. –  O. R. Mapper Feb 4 '14 at 16:22

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can multiple with -1 on odd numbers, therefore use the % operator:

for (int i = 2; i <= 100; i++)
{
    int val = i % 2 == 1 ? i * -1 : i;
    Console.WriteLine(val);
}

Demo

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Thank you really much! It worked, and it is yet so simple. Thanks again. –  developi Feb 4 '14 at 16:24
for(int i=2;i<=100;++i){
    Console.WriteLine(i % 2 == 1 ? -i : i);
}
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Pretty simple if we use modulo

The steps are faily straight forward. If we will notice the it's the same solution as printing 2-100 but with 1 little twist, for the odd places the number i should be at his negative sign. So the solution will be the same.

Steps:

  1. Loop i to 100
  2. For every iteration we will decide if it's odd or even.
  3. If i is even will multiply it by 1 that will result with i of course.
    else, that means it's odd and thus, resulting in multiplying with -1, resulting with minus i.

Code

for (int i = 2; i <= 100; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(i * (i%2 == 0 ? 1 : -1));
}
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@AndyG, I don't think anything can be overkill for this question :) –  Orel Eraki Feb 4 '14 at 16:25
1  
I'd say the conditional is clearer. All the info required to understand it is right there in the loop, so you don't have to trace through the loop or make inferences about the sign. –  cHao Feb 4 '14 at 16:25
    
For reference, one could also say Console.WriteLine(i%2==0 ? i : -i);. –  cHao Feb 4 '14 at 16:35
    
@cHao, Indeed, i wanted to improve it, but than i saw BLUEPIXY used that in his solution, so i chose not to edit mine, otherwise it won't be fair and also it's good for the author to see many solutions. But yeah i liked that more :) –  Orel Eraki Feb 4 '14 at 16:36
1  
@AndyG, Sorry it's appears I was wrong, there is an overkill was for this solution. I just saw Sergey Berezovskiy solution. The author having difficulties with this loop and his giving him LINQ. –  Orel Eraki Feb 4 '14 at 16:38

You should iterate from 2 to 100 one by one (yes, all are positive values) Then in loop body you should invert sign on each iteration (by multiplying on "-1") and print the result on screen.

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Using bitwise and to spot the odd numbers:

for (int i = 2; i <= 100; i += 1)
{
  int toPrint = i

  if((i & 1)==1)
  {
    // It's odd
    toPrint = -toPrint;
  }

  Console.WriteLine(toPrint);
}
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    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
       for (int i = 2; i <= 100; i++)
        {
            if (i % 2 == 1)
            {
                int j = -i;
                Console.WriteLine(j);
            }
            else
            Console.WriteLine(i);
        }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
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As we all did this task in school:

Enumerable.Range(2, Int32.MaxValue - 1)
          .TakeWhile(i => i <= 100)
          .Select(i => i % 2 == 0 ? i : -i)
          .ToList()
          .ForEach(Console.WriteLine);
share|improve this answer
    
Why the .TakeWhile, rather than just saying Enumerable.Range(2, 100 - 1)? –  cHao Feb 6 '14 at 16:16
    
@cHao it was Enumerable.Range(2, 100 - 1) in previous edit, but then I decided to make it less acceptable for homework –  Sergey Berezovskiy Feb 6 '14 at 19:26

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