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I have this really simple block of code:

    private void dataGridView1_KeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.KeyCode == Keys.V && e.Modifiers == Keys.Control)
            AddRow();

        if (e.KeyCode == Keys.Back && dataGridView1.SelectedRows.Count > 0)
            RemoveRow();
    }

Then when I step through my code and hit either Delete or Backspace, this is the value of e.KeyCode:

enter image description here

I know my code doesn't check for Delete but I can add that in simply afterwards.

If I cast KeyCode to a string, it gives me the value "Delete" but I shouldn't have to do that...

edit; I should note that my first block of code, for Ctrl-V works perfectly fine. So I don't understand why e.KeyCode doesn't evaluate to Keys.Delete or Keys.Backspace?

edit 2; My coworker found something that could be 100% coincidental, or extremely interesting.

KeyCode.Delete = 46. KeyCode.Space = 32 KeyCode.Back = 8 KeyCode.MButton = 4; KeyCode.RButton = 2;

32 + 8 + 4 + 2 = 46. I feel like some tinfoil hat conspiracy theorist for thinking this might be on to something, but we're completely baffled.

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So what's your question again? –  davidsbro Feb 4 '14 at 17:16
    
@davidsbro Why does e.KeyCode evaluate to RButton | MButton | Back | Space when I press Delete or Backspace. Sorry, added that to the bottom of my edit. –  sab669 Feb 4 '14 at 17:17

2 Answers 2

From MSDN, "This enumeration has a FlagsAttribute attribute that allows a bitwise combination of its member values"

What you see is string representation of the enum value. It uses Flags attribute to construct the string in Enum.ToString() method. See this SO question for more clarification.

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Back is the enumeration value that indicates the backspace key was pressed (MSDN-Keys Enumeration). Example code:

if (e.KeyCode.HasFlag(Keys.Back)) {
   //do stuff here
}
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But I'm only pressing the Delete Key. Why would it think I'm also pressing MButton, RButton and Space? –  sab669 Feb 4 '14 at 17:46
    
Also, I tried this HasFlag call and now it deletes two rows instead of one and still evaluates to MButton RButton etc. –  sab669 Feb 4 '14 at 17:58

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