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So I am trying to run code from a hardcoded ASM file launched from a C file whose entire role is basically "call the ASM file" (I'll attach the code below, although I'm not sure if it'll help), and I keep running into segfaults. I'm fairly new to this, and so I'm kind of lost on what to do. I compiled it, ran it, and then ran gdb on it:

- gcc -g SHL.c CRC32.S -o CRC
- gdb CRC
(gdb) core core
(gdb) run <inputs>

And I got this:

program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation Fault
0x00008f0c in ??()

running "where" gave me

#0 0x00008f0c in ??()
#1 0x000086be

When tryin to get breapoints, instead of the usual code, I got this:

(gdb) b 1
Breakpoint 1 at 0xb6f0ae10: file ../sysdeps/unix/sysv/linux/init-first.c, line 1
(gdb) b 30
Breakpoint 2 at 0xb6f0ae10: file ../sysdeps/unix/sysv/linux/init-first.c, line 30

...Really helpful. I figure I should be able to do something with 8f0c, but, well, I don't know how to go from that to "this is where that line in code is". Any help showing me how to debug this, or showing me errors in my coding, would be much appreciated.


    .globl CRC32

CRC32:
## Push the registers I want to use for my variables and the link register (ALWAYS LINK REGISTER!)
_INIT:      PUSH {r4-r11, lr};          ##  We get a pointer to the first address of an array (char array) and an int directly

# copy input/output to memory (so as not to override them): address of array in r4
            MOV r4, r0              ;

##; Find length of CRC polynomial in bit, save it in r6 
            CLZ r6, r1              ;
            MOV r7, #32             ;   ##Fuck everything about this programming language.
            SUB r6, r7, r6              ; 

##; Shift CRC polynomial so that most significant bit is at position 32
            LSL r1, r1, r6          ;
##;LOCKED: R4 (Pointer, needed for DLOOP), R1 (Polynom), R6 (length of CRC), R0 (Pointer)

##; start loop to determine length of data
            MOV r8, #0              ;## ensures r8 is empty
_DLOOP:         LDRB r7, [r4, #-3]      ;## loads first 8 bits from r4 into r7; these zero extend;
            ADD r4, r4, #1          ;## iterates r4 by 1 byte
            CMP r7, #0              ;## Checks if r7 is null, if so...
            BEQ _CANC               ;## ...Exit loop
            ADD r8, r8, #1          ;## r8 records how many bytes are in array
            B _DLOOP                ;## Loop repeat

##; At this point, r4 is pointing at the ending byte of the array and the three following bytes, needs to be reset
##; r8 contains the total length in bytes of the array, including the terminal bit
_CANC:      LDR r4, [r0]            ;
            MOV r5, r0              ;
            LDR r3, [r5, #4]!       ;
            MOV r2, #0              ;##     Ensures r2 is 0
            MOV r11, #0             ;## Ditto r11
            MOV r10, #8             ;## The first two words are loaded, so the word that is loaded the first time R10 is incremented in the loop will be bytes 8-12!
##;LOCKED: R1 (CRC Polynomial), R6 (Length of Polynomial), R0 (Starting offset), R8 (#bytes in array), R3 (Second word), R4 (First word)

##;r4 now contains the front word of the data, r3 contains the next word. 
##;r4 will be divided via XOR with the polynomial. Following this, the leading zeroes will be counted, and saved in r7. 
##;r4 shifts left equal to the number of leading zeroes; then that many bits will be extracted from r3 and pinned onto the end of r4
##;r7, r11, r2 will hold the temporary results
##;r9 will contain the moving counter of how many shifts have been performed. After 32 shifts, the word in r3 must be replaced and r10 is incremented by 4
##;r10 contains the moving counter of total bytes used to compare to r8, and calculate where the next offset is based on r0.
##;r5 contains the address where r3 gets its data

_EORLOOP:   CLZ r7, r4              ;   ##Checks leading zeroes of r4, places them in r7, our sketchpad
            LSL r4, r4, r7          ;   ##Shifts by r7, which can be zero
_FULOOP:    CMP r7, #0              ;   ##if no leading zeros...
            BEQ _EXOR               ;   ##skip ahead to the XOR
            UBFX r11, r3, #31, #1   ;   ##else get last bit from second word and store into r11 ( -> 00001)
            LSL r2, r2, #1          ;   ##shift the total of extracted bits from second word (00001 -> 00010)
            ADD r2, r11, r2         ;   ##augment running tally (00010 -> 00011)
            SUB r7, r7, #1          ;   ##decrement counter
            LSL r3, r3, #1          ;   ##shift r3 forward by one
            ADD r9, r9, #1          ;   ##Increments shift counter by 1 per shift 
            CMP r9, #32             ;   ##Checks if r3 is empty
            BEQ _NEWWRD             ;   ##If so, get new word for r3
            B _FULOOP               ;   ##loop

_NEWWRD:    ADD r10, r10, #4        ;   ##Augments the moving counter of total bytes used
            MOV r9, #0              ;   ##Resets r9
            CMP r10, r8             ;   ##Checks if r10 is equal to or greater than r8 (total number of bytes used)
            BGE _DONE               ;   ##If so, we have no more words to push, and need to clean up
            LDR r3, [r5, #4]!       ;   ##Loads new word from 4 bytes further than last word into r3...
            B _FULOOP               ;   ##...And goes back to checking how many bit shifts we need.


_EXOR:      EOR r4, r4, r2          ;   ##attaches the Most Significant Bits from r3 (that were added together in FULOOP) to the back of r4.
            MOV r2, #0              ;   ##Resets r2...
            MOV r11, #0             ;   ##...and r11
            EOR r4, r4, r1          ;   ##replaces r4 with the result of polynomial division between the current 32-bit word and the 32-bit polynomial in r1
            B _EORLOOP              ;   ##Restarts the loop


_DONE:      SUB r10, r10, r8        ;   ##Checks how many bytes are actually left; this number should be between 0 and 3!
            CMP r10, #0             ;   ##If r10 is 0
            ADDEQ r10, #4           ;   ##Then it actually should be 4. 
            MOV r8, #8
            MUL r9, r10, r8         ;   ##Gives r9 the number of bits needed to move (number of bytes


##; use r10 with r11/r2 as above and UBFX to get remaining bits; polynomial divide during?

##;In the last  word, the content does not matter, so we can safely just shift and let the zeroes fill in.
_CLEANUP:       CMP r9, #0              ;##     Checks if it is done
            BEQ _RETURN             ;## And goes through the final step
            CLZ r7, r4              ;## Checks leading zeroes of r4, places them in r7, our sketchpad
            CMP r7, #0              ;## Checks if there are no leading zeroes
            EOREQ r4, r4, r1        ;## If so, EOR 
            LSL r4, r4, #1          ;## Shifts by 1
            ADD r9, r9, #1          ;## Counts the shifts
            B _CLEANUP              ;## Loops

    _BUG:       M

OV r4, #0       ;## Realistically, this probably should never happen. But if the program constantly gives us steaks, we know what's wrong.

_RETURN:    LDR r0, [r4]                ;
            POP {r4-r11, pc}        ;## Pops registers, goes back to program counter
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

GDB can not determine what function address 0x8f0c belongs to, therefor it shows 0x00008f0c in ??(). If it knew, it would print something like "0x00008f0c in foobar()".

This probably means you ended at that address by mistake.

What I would do is put few breakpoints at other points in code (like _INIT, _DLOOP, _CANC, _CLEANUP, _RETURN) and see if program flow reaches those.

To get code line for some address in your program you can use addr2line tool, or nm or objdump. But they will probably not know any better than gdb.

BTW: You can put a breakpoint to address directly with break *0x8f0c.

share|improve this answer
    
"breakpoints"? How does that work with ASM? I tried it with GDB and I honestly couldn't parse what it was telling me. Should I just use "b INIT"? –  Jonah Stephen Swersey Feb 5 '14 at 10:53
    
b _INIT or b *whatever_the_address_of_init_is –  dbrank0 Feb 5 '14 at 11:15
    
Thanks! :D Found my errors. Now to get the algorithm to do what it's supposed to... –  Jonah Stephen Swersey Feb 5 '14 at 22:06

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