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public class Dene {

    private char ch;
    private Dene next;

    public Dene(char c) {
        this.ch = c;
    }

    public void add(Dene next) {
        this.next = next;
    }

    public boolean isWriteable(String s) {

        if (this.next == null) {
            if (s.contains(Character.toString(this.ch))) {
                return true;
            } else {
                return false;
            }
        } else {
            return this.next.isWriteable(s);
        }
    }
}


public static void main(String[] args) {
    Dene d = new Dene('a');
    Dene e = new Dene('e');
    Dene f = new Dene('f');
    d.add(e);
    e.add(f);
    System.out.println(d.IsWriteable("afb"));
}

IsWriteable gets a string as a parameter and sees recursively if its possible to write that string from the chars which are connected in the linked list.. but it is not working..any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
what is the aim of isWritable method?? – Kick Feb 4 '14 at 20:10
    
Dene is a start node of a linked list.isWritable gets a string and checks if this string is writeable from the chars which linked list has.. – Tolga Tamer Feb 4 '14 at 20:14
    
Define it is not working: does not compile, does compile but you got an exception when running it, runs but gives unexpected results? – Luiggi Mendoza Feb 4 '14 at 20:14
    
unexpected results – Tolga Tamer Feb 4 '14 at 20:15
    
Please edit your question and show a sample of expected results and your current result. – Luiggi Mendoza Feb 4 '14 at 20:18
up vote 2 down vote accepted

At first I had Problems to understand your code. In my opinion you should create a isWriteable(char c) function, so you can check a character recursively:

public bool isWriteable(char c){
    if (this.x == null){
        return c == this.ch;
    else {
        return this.ch == c && this.x.isWriteable(c);
    }
}

To check a string you just have to check every character of your string.

Update

Added the code of character checking:

public bool isWriteable(String s){
    char[] chars = s.toCharArray();
    int i;
    char c;
    for (i = 0; i < chars.length; i++){
        if (!isWriteable(c)){
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

(i hope this is correct because i havent used Java for some time now)

Update I saw i could have made it so much easier:

public bool isWriteable(String s){
    if (this.x == null){
        return s.contains(this.ch);
    }
    else {
        return this.x.isWriteable(s) & s.contains(this.ch);
    }
}

This is recursive and serves its purpose.

share|improve this answer
    
nope thats not what i m looking for.. – Tolga Tamer Feb 4 '14 at 20:34
    
but in my opinion i rewrote the isWriteable function that recursively checks if the string can be put together from the chars of the linked list – Sirac Feb 4 '14 at 20:41
    
but what i need is recursion – Tolga Tamer Feb 4 '14 at 20:45
    
this is given in the first code Segment: isWriteable(char) calls isWriteable(char) in line 5. See edited code, you can use the last code Segment or the other 2, both should work well. – Sirac Feb 4 '14 at 20:47
1  
im glad i could help you – Sirac Feb 4 '14 at 21:08

It looks like you are lacking open and closing braces to clearly define what belongs in each if/else block. As a general rule even though Java allows you not to, you should always put an open and closing brace on if statements and also loops to make your code easier to read, follow, and debug.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, I fixed it in a new edit. – Alexis Leclerc Feb 4 '14 at 20:24

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