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I was wanting to use the repository pattern and create a generic resuable component. I noticed that when i used the following interface and base class i found that sometimes i didn't implement certain methods( for example sometimes i never needed to call getAll() to retrieve a list of all the objects, that operation wasn't needed within my application for the specific class ).

public interface IRepository<TEntity, TId>
{
   void Delete(TEntity entity);
   TEntity Get(TId id);
   IEnumerable<TEntity> GetAll();
   void Save();
   void Update(TEntity entity);
   void Create(TEntity entity);
}

I decided to separate the fat interface into mini smaller ones. I then came up with little implementations that could be composed together to get exactly what you need for your repository implementation.Below is what i came up with. Could anyone give me advice on problems with the below solution that exist?

public abstract class Entity<TId> : IEntityIdentity<TId>
{
    public TId Id { get; set; }
}

public interface IEntityIdentity<TId>
{
    TId Id { get; set; }
}


public interface IDeleteRepository<TEntity, TId> where TEntity : Entity<TId>
{
    void Delete(TEntity entity);
}

public class DeleteRepository<TEntity, TId> : IDeleteRepository<TEntity, TId> where TEntity : Entity<TId>
{
    private readonly DbContext _dbContext;

    public DeleteRepository(DbContext dbContext)
    {
        _dbContext = dbContext;
    }


    public void Delete(TEntity entity)
    {
        _dbContext.Set<TEntity>().Remove(entity);
    }
}

public interface ISaveRepository<TEntity, TId> where TEntity : Entity<TId>
{
    void Save(TEntity entity);
}

public class SaveRepository<TEntity, TId> : ISaveRepository<TEntity, TId> where TEntity : Entity<TId>
{

     private readonly DbContext _dbContext;

     public SaveRepository(DbContext dbContext)
    {
        _dbContext = dbContext;
    }


    public void Save(TEntity entity)
    {
        _dbContext.SaveChanges();
    }
}

public interface IUpdateRepository<TEntity, TId> where TEntity : Entity<TId>
{
    void Update(TEntity entity);
}

public class UpdateRepository<TEntity, TId> : IUpdateRepository<TEntity, TId> where TEntity : Entity<TId>
{

    private readonly DbContext _dbContext;

    public UpdateRepository(DbContext dbContext)
    {
        _dbContext = dbContext;
    }

    public void Update(TEntity entity)
    {
        _dbContext.Entry(entity).State = EntityState.Modified;
    }
}

public interface IGetRepository<TEntity, TId> where TEntity : Entity<TId>
{
    TEntity Get(TId id);
}

public class GetRepository<TEntity, TId> : IGetRepository<TEntity, TId> where TEntity : Entity<TId>
{
    private readonly DbContext _dbContext;

    public GetRepository(DbContext dbContext)
    {
        _dbContext = dbContext;
    }

    public TEntity Get(TId id)
    {
        return _dbContext.Set<TEntity>().Find(id);
    }
}

public interface IGetAllRepository<TEntity, TId> where TEntity : Entity<TId>
{
    IEnumerable<TEntity> GetAll();
}

public class GetAllRepository<TEntity, TId> : IGetAllRepository<TEntity, TId> where TEntity : Entity<TId>
{
    private readonly DbContext _dbContext;

    public GetAllRepository(DbContext dbContext)
    {
        _dbContext = dbContext;
    }

    public IEnumerable<TEntity> GetAll()
    {
        return _dbContext.Set<TEntity>();
    }
}

public interface ICreateRepository<TEntity, TId> where TEntity : Entity<TId>
{
    void Create(TEntity entity);
}

public class CreateRepository<TEntity, TId> : ICreateRepository<TEntity, TId> where TEntity : Entity<TId>
{
    private readonly DbContext _dbContext;

    public CreateRepository(DbContext dbContext)
    {
        _dbContext = dbContext;
    }

    public void Create(TEntity entity)
    {
        _dbContext.Set<TEntity>().Add(entity);
    }
}

public class RepositoryCombiner<TEntity, TId> : IGetRepository<TEntity, TId>, IGetAllRepository<TEntity, TId> where TEntity : Entity<TId>
{
    private readonly IGetRepository<TEntity, TId> _getRepository;
    private readonly IGetAllRepository<TEntity, TId> _getAllRepository;

    public RepositoryCombiner(IGetRepository<TEntity, TId> getRepository, IGetAllRepository<TEntity, TId> getAllRepository)
    {
        _getRepository = getRepository;
        _getAllRepository = getAllRepository;
    }

    public TEntity Get(TId id)
    {
       return  _getRepository.Get(id);
    }

    public IEnumerable<TEntity> GetAll()
    {
        return _getAllRepository.GetAll();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I use a mixture of the two. I have the separate roles (interfaces) and implement the required functionality on one repository, as opposed to having a repository per role. –  Eben Roux Feb 5 '14 at 4:24
    
Reminds me of Udi Dahan's Making Roles Explicit : infoq.com/presentations/Making-Roles-Explicit-Udi-Dahan Why not, but a bit verbose and clunky to express in a language like C# IMO –  guillaume31 Feb 7 '14 at 12:50

2 Answers 2

To me, it seems like you are over thinking it. In the event anyone else looks at your code, it may not be very clear what you were trying to accomplish. I would suggest going for maintainability instead of pre-mature optimization, which is where you are headed.

If in the end, certain methods are never used in your code base and you are code-complete on your project, then it may make sense to remove what isn't being called. But for the time being, I'd leave it at just using the standard repository pattern and focus your time and energy on other areas of the application.

Whether others would do the same or not is up to them, but for retrieving data, I just use a single GetQueryable() and then do the .Single(), .First, or .All() as needed - plus if your underlying storage supports IQueryable fairly well, your queries can become more optimized.

share|improve this answer

it's not a bad idea to use interface segregation principle when it's really need. but in your situation I advice you to use the layer super type pattern with repository pattern. in general try to make things simple, simple to read, understand, extend and also maintainable. I've seen most of people make mistake specially in data access and repository layer. code duplication in data access layer could be cost effective and cumbersome in future changes.

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