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I have a list of strings I'm iterating over, and I need to exclude certain ones and include others in the subsequent processing. Something like this:

listmystuff | for /F "usebackq" %%D in (`findstr /r "something*" ^| findstr /v "but not thisstuff"`)  do interestingthing

This is wrong. What does work is having one of the findstr's but not both. What would be right?

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What error do you get? Show an example of your input if it is still failing. –  foxidrive Feb 6 at 16:25
    
I'm still getting the "| was unexpected at this time" error when I have two findstr's –  iss42 Feb 6 at 16:26
    
My input is piped from a mysql "show databases" command. –  iss42 Feb 6 at 16:27

2 Answers 2

You want a pipe |, not conditional command concatenation &&. The pipe character must be escaped.

You only want one set of single quotes around the entire commmand. (or backticks if using usebackq option)

You need to double the percents if used within a batch file.

Your initial FINDSTR needs a filespec to search (or else data piped into it)

for /f "options" %%D in ('findstr "something" fileSpec ^| findstr /v "butNotThis"') do myThing
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I am using "usebackq"! I tried this but got "| was unexpected at this time."? –  iss42 Feb 4 at 22:39
    
@iss42 - Did you remember to escape the pipe as ^|? It should work. –  dbenham Feb 4 at 22:43
    
yip I did, I also have findstr /r "something*" using the wildcard, but no fileSpec, maybe thats the issue? What is fileSpec? –  iss42 Feb 4 at 23:20
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@iss42 - fileSpec represents the file(s) you want to search. You definitely want one, but the absence will not cause that error. Edit your question to include the exact statement that is failing. –  dbenham Feb 5 at 0:33
    
I've updated the question, thanks for you help @dbenham –  iss42 Feb 6 at 15:35

Give this a run with your show databases command. This is the usual way to use a for command to parse data.

for /F "delims=" %%D in ('show databases ^| findstr /r "something*" ^| findstr /v /c:"but not thisstuff" ')  do echo %%D
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I don't understand the "file.txt" part, I don't have a file? I am piping data to this find if that helps. –  iss42 Feb 6 at 16:08
    
findstr normally takes data from a file, or through a preceding pipe. But the code works fine if I remove "file.txt" and pipe data through the batch file. –  foxidrive Feb 6 at 16:16
    
I'm still getting the "| was unexpected at this time" error when I have two findstr's –  iss42 Feb 6 at 16:25
    
I edited the code. –  foxidrive Feb 6 at 16:30
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If you want to pipe into a for command then you have to accept that it is not supported by Microsoft and that anything that results from it is more from luck than good design. :) –  foxidrive Feb 9 at 2:20

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