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Using dbms_sql.execute, is it possible to programatically retrieve the sql_id of the query being executed?

Here is my failed attempt:

declare
  v_sql_text varchar2(128) := 'select 123 from dual';
  v_cursor INTEGER;
  v_ret number;

  v_sql_id varchar2(13) := null;
BEGIN
  v_cursor := dbms_sql.open_cursor;
  dbms_sql.parse(v_cursor, v_sql_text, dbms_sql.native);   

  -- ==================================================
  -- attempt 1 - after parse
  select prev_sql_id
    into v_sql_id
    from v$session
    where audsid = sys_context('userenv', 'sessionid');

  dbms_output.put_line('after parse: ' || v_sql_id);
  -- ==================================================

  v_ret := dbms_sql.execute(v_cursor);

  -- ==================================================
  -- attempt 2 - after execute - this doesn't seem to work either
  --select prev_sql_id
  --  into v_sql_id
  --  from v$session
  --  where audsid = sys_context('userenv', 'sessionid');

  --dbms_output.put_line('after execute: ' || v_sql_id);
  -- ==================================================

  dbms_sql.close_cursor(v_cursor);
END;
/

1) Is this even possible?

2) Is there a better approach?

Additional Information - 2/17/2014

I'm really after the sql_id and child_number.

We use a combination of dbms_scheduler and dbms_sql to run reports "in the background". My intent is to capture and store two pieces of information - sql_id and child_number - with each report run. I'd like to capture this information for diagnostic purposes (example - it is possible to display the cached execution plan of a specific query run by using dbms_xplan.display_cursor(sql_id, sql_child)). This way we would not be reliant on Enterprise Manager, nor would we have to copy/paste the query text into sqlplus to see the plan [and very likely end up with a hard parse and potentially different plan].

One thing that adds complication is our use of bind variables. For the same sql_id, there could be many different "sub-plans" depending on bind variable peeking / histograms. For this reason, I'm hesitant to query directly against v$sql to get this information. I would rather try and find some kind of hard link using v$session, dbms_sql, or some other Tom Kyte-style sorcery.

Update 2/21/2014

Working on a solution based on information from the following sources:

http://dba.stackexchange.com/questions/55609/how-to-use-the-dbms-sql-to-get-the-analyze-for-insert-into-statement http://asktom.oracle.com/pls/apex/f?p=100:11:0::::P11_QUESTION_ID:40832696008013

I will post a concise example once it is cleaned up. Thanks for the replies.

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "this doesn't seem to work"? When I ran your code un-commenting the code, it gave me two distinct SQL ids for before and after. – Annjawn Feb 4 '14 at 22:57
    
To clarify, I'm trying to programatically get the sql_id of "select 123 from dual". In my system, neither of the sql_ids outputted give me the correct handle. Try using select * from gv$sql where sql_id = <your sql_id>. – Don.Mega Feb 5 '14 at 14:47
    
What do you want to do with sql_id ? – igr Feb 12 '14 at 20:55
    
@Don.Mega I updated my answer so that it only looks 5 minutes back, which is plenty of time since the query just ran right before hand. Adding that made the sql block run considerably faster on my test system. – gfrobenius Feb 12 '14 at 20:57
    
Thank you gfrobenius. I have added additional clarification to my question as to why I prefer not to do a query text lookup using v$sql. This is probably a great solution in different circumstances. – Don.Mega Feb 17 '14 at 17:32

This works for me.

declare
  v_sql_text varchar2(128) := 'select 112233 from dual';
  v_cursor INTEGER;
  v_ret number;

  v_sql_id varchar2(13) := null;
BEGIN
  v_cursor := dbms_sql.open_cursor;
  dbms_sql.parse(v_cursor, v_sql_text, dbms_sql.native);   
  v_ret := dbms_sql.execute(v_cursor);
  dbms_sql.close_cursor(v_cursor);

  --To save time lets only look 5 minutes back
  --last_load_time is a varchar that's why we have to use to_date
  select sql_id into v_sql_id from v$sql
  where dbms_lob.compare(sql_fulltext, v_sql_text) = 0
  and to_date(last_load_time,'YYYY-MM-DD/HH24:MI:SS') > sysdate - (5/1440);

  dbms_output.put_line('v_sql_id: ' || v_sql_id);

END;
/
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the fast answer, gfrobenius. I'm realizing now that my initial question did not provide all the details. Your solution does however solve the problem as it was initially stated. – Don.Mega Feb 17 '14 at 17:33

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