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I was working throught an example in Andy Fields book Discovering statistics using R that was quite similar to the analysis I have to carry out on my dataset. Unfortunately I kept on getting an error message when I ran the example code on the example data.

I subsequently updated to the newest version of R and reinstalled the required packages, but got the same error. I then saved the code and ran it on someones Windows 8 machine and the code worked just fine.

As far as I can tell the issue has to do with difference between R in Linux vs R in Windows.

Below is the code required to generate the error when running in R (3.0.2) on a linux machine (Linux Mint 14, 64-bit):

# #Install required packages
install.packages("nlme")
library(nlme)
#Enter data by hand
participant<-gl(20, 9, labels = c("P01", "P02", "P03", "P04", "P05", "P06", "P07", "P08", "P09", "P10", "P11", "P12", "P13", "P14", "P15", "P16", "P17", "P18", "P19", "P20" ))
drink<-gl(3, 3, 180, labels = c("Beer", "Wine", "Water"))
imagery<-gl(3, 1, 180, labels = c("Positive", "Negative", "Neutral"))
groups<-gl(9, 1, 180, labels = c("beerpos", "beerneg", "beerneut", "winepos", "wineneg", "wineneut", "waterpos", "waterneg", "waterneut"))
attitude<-c(1, 6, 5, 38, -5, 4, 10, -14, -2, 26, 27, 27, 23, -15, 14, 21, -6, 0, 1, -19, -10, 28, -13, 13, 33, -2, 9, 7, -18, 6, 26, -16, 19, 23, -17, 5, 22, -8, 4, 34, -23, 14, 21, -19, 0, 30, -6, 3, 32, -22, 21, 17, -11, 4, 40, -6, 0, 24, -9, 19, 15, -10, 2, 15, -9, 4, 29, -18, 7, 13, -17, 8, 20, -17, 9, 30, -17, 12, 16, -4, 10, 9, -12, -5, 24, -15, 18, 17, -4, 8, 14, -11, 7, 34, -14, 20, 19, -1, 12, 43, 30, 8, 20, -12, 4, 9, -10, -13, 15, -6, 13, 23, -15, 15, 29, -1, 10, 15, 15, 12, 20, -15, 6, 6, -16, 1, 40, 30, 19, 28, -4, 0, 20, -10, 2, 8, 12, 8, 11, -2, 6, 27, 5, -5, 17, 17, 15, 17, -6, 6, 9, -6, -13, 30, 21, 21, 15, -2, 16, 19, -20, 3, 34, 23, 28, 27, -7, 7, 12, -12, 2, 34, 20, 26, 24, -10, 12, 12, -9, 4)

longAttitude<-data.frame(participant, drink, imagery, groups, attitude)
#Setting contrasts
AlcoholvsWater<-c(1, 1, -2)
BeervsWine<-c(-1, 1, 0)
NegativevsOther<-c(1, -2, 1)
PositivevsNeutral<-c(-1, 0, 1)
contrasts(longAttitude$drink)<-cbind(AlcoholvsWater, BeervsWine)
contrasts(longAttitude$imagery)<-cbind(NegativevsOther, PositivevsNeutral)
#Running the factorial repeated-measures design as a GLM
baseline<-lme(attitude ~ 1, random = ~1|participant/drink/imagery, 
               data = longAttitude, method = "ML")
drinkModel<-update(baseline, .~. + drink)
imageryModel<-update(drinkModel, .~. + imagery)
attitudeModel<-update(imageryModel, .~. + drink:imagery)
anova(baseline, drinkModel, imageryModel, attitudeModel)

Error Message

I get as far as running the first part of the model (i.e., baseline<-lme...). However, when I go on the add the next factor (i.e., + drink), I get the following error:

Error in solve.default(-val) : Lapack routine dgesv: system is exactly singular: U[2,2] = 0

I looked up this error code and found out that: The error message is telling you that your matrix is singular and cannot be inverted.

The funny thing is that running the same code on the same version of R on a Windows machines runs the code just fine.

Any help on this issue would be appreciated.

Output of R sessionInfo()

Here is the output of sessionInfo() from the Windows machine:

R version 3.0.2 (2013-09-25)
Platform: x86_64-w64-mingw32/x64 (64-bit)

locale:
[1] LC_COLLATE=English_Australia.1252  LC_CTYPE=English_Australia.1252    LC_MONETARY=English_Australia.1252
[4] LC_NUMERIC=C                       LC_TIME=English_Australia.1252    

attached base packages:
[1] stats     graphics  grDevices utils     datasets  methods   base     

other attached packages:
[1] nlme_3.1-113

loaded via a namespace (and not attached):
[1] grid_3.0.2      lattice_0.20-23 tools_3.0.2   

Here is the output of sessionInfo() from the Linux machine:

R version 3.0.2 (2013-09-25)
Platform: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu (64-bit)

locale:
 [1] LC_CTYPE=en_AU.UTF-8       LC_NUMERIC=C               LC_TIME=en_AU.UTF-8        LC_COLLATE=en_AU.UTF-8     LC_MONETARY=en_AU.UTF-8   
 [6] LC_MESSAGES=en_AU.UTF-8    LC_PAPER=en_AU.UTF-8       LC_NAME=C                  LC_ADDRESS=C               LC_TELEPHONE=C            
[11] LC_MEASUREMENT=en_AU.UTF-8 LC_IDENTIFICATION=C       

attached base packages:
[1] stats     graphics  grDevices utils     datasets  methods   base     

other attached packages:
[1] reshape_0.8.4 plyr_1.8      nlme_3.1-113 

loaded via a namespace (and not attached):
[1] grid_3.0.2      lattice_0.20-24 tools_3.0.2    

Update: Code works on a different Linux machine

I honestly did not think it would change anything, but I decided to run the above code on my home (Linux Mint) laptop. Surprisingly, it worked just fine. While this is a positive things, I am a little unsure why I run into problems with my work machine running the newest version of R.

Any help with this issue would still be appreciated.

Output of the last line of the code:

              Model df      AIC      BIC    logLik   Test   L.Ratio p-value
baseline          1  5 1503.590 1519.555 -746.7950                         
drinkModel        2  7 1498.461 1520.812 -742.2306 1 vs 2   9.12891  0.0104
imageryModel      3  9 1350.529 1379.265 -666.2644 2 vs 3 151.93237  <.0001
attitudeModel     4 13 1316.512 1358.020 -645.2560 3 vs 4  42.01676  <.0001

sessionInfo() for the Linux machine that can run the code:

R version 2.15.2 (2012-10-26)
Platform: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu (64-bit)

locale:
 [1] LC_CTYPE=en_AU.UTF-8       LC_NUMERIC=C               LC_TIME=en_AU.UTF-8       
 [4] LC_COLLATE=en_AU.UTF-8     LC_MONETARY=en_AU.UTF-8    LC_MESSAGES=en_AU.UTF-8   
 [7] LC_PAPER=C                 LC_NAME=C                  LC_ADDRESS=C              
[10] LC_TELEPHONE=C             LC_MEASUREMENT=en_AU.UTF-8 LC_IDENTIFICATION=C       

attached base packages:
[1] splines   stats     graphics  grDevices utils     datasets  methods   base     

other attached packages:
 [1] reshape_0.8.4    plyr_1.8         pastecs_1.3-15   boot_1.3-7      
 [5] nlme_3.1-108     multcomp_1.3-1   TH.data_1.0-3    survival_2.37-7 
 [9] mvtnorm_0.9-9994 ggplot2_0.9.3.1  compute.es_0.2-3

loaded via a namespace (and not attached):
 [1] colorspace_1.2-1   dichromat_2.0-0    digest_0.6.2       grid_2.15.2       
 [5] gtable_0.1.2       labeling_0.1       lattice_0.20-13    MASS_7.3-23       
 [9] munsell_0.4        proto_0.3-10       RColorBrewer_1.0-5 reshape2_1.2.2    
[13] sandwich_2.3-0     scales_0.2.3       stringr_0.6.2      tools_2.15.2      
[17] zoo_1.7-9    
share|improve this question
    
Can you include the sessionInfo() for both machines. I can confirm it appears to work on 3.0.2 on 64 bit windows with nlme_3.1-111. –  mnel Feb 5 at 0:34
    
There is exactly one individual per participant:drink:imagery category, which means that the residual variance is confounded with the participant:drink:imagery random effect. lme doesn't notice this. lmer (from the lme4 package) does: it complains that you have exactly as many levels of participant:drink:imagery (the innermost nesting factor) as observations, which makes the linear mixed model unidentifiable (in particular, you can only the find the sum of residual variance + part/drink/imagery variance, not their individual values) –  Ben Bolker Feb 5 at 3:43
    
Thank you for the comment @BenBolker. I partly understand your explanation (I don't fully understand simply because I am not well versed in these types of analyses). I have added some additional information to my post showing that I can run the code on my home laptop running linux (older version of R), and I get the same output that I got from a Windows machine. Does this mean that the output is non-sense given what you point out about the model being unidentifiable? Let me know what you think. –  NeuronsFiring Feb 5 at 7:53
    
The model doesn't really make sense. Some of the components, such as the among-participant or among-drink variance, might still be identifiable. One can have an argument about whether the software should still fit the model (picking an arbitrary division of the residual variance into two terms) ... the estimates of the fixed effects are probably still OK. You should get very similar answers if you simply use participant/drink, and not participant/drink/imagery, as your random effects. –  Ben Bolker Feb 5 at 14:32

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