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I know how to make 2 divs float side by side, simply float one to the left and the other to the right. But how to do this with 3 divs or should I just using tables for this purpose?

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2  
Not enough information. How wide are the layers? –  Josh Stodola Jan 28 '10 at 18:01
    
I'd display: inline-block those guys rather than float them. If their widths are in total less than the container width they'll sit next to each other. –  Adam Waite Jul 13 at 23:32

13 Answers 13

Just give them a width and float: left;, here's an example:

<div style="width: 500px;">
 <div style="float: left; width: 200px;">Left Stuff</div>
 <div style="float: left; width: 100px;">Middle Stuff</div>
 <div style="float: left; width: 200px;">Right Stuff</div>
 <br style="clear: left;" />
</div>
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1  
What if you want them all to expand as the page is expanded? –  Imray Mar 7 at 13:56
8  
@imray just use % instead of px –  TehTris Mar 20 at 3:43

Sounds to me like you are In Search of the Holy Grail!

Humor aside, the article I have linked to is one that I believe every front-end developer needs to read and understand.

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4  
Wow, that is an excellent article. Definitely +1. –  JMD Jan 28 '10 at 18:25

It is same way as you do for the two divs, just float the third one to left or right too.

<style>
  .left{float:left; width:33%;}
</style>

<div class="left">...</div>
<div class="left">...</div>
<div class="left">...</div>
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1  
But DIV is a block level element, right? Then how come they are placed side by side and not in the next lines(as block level elements start and end with a line break). Does float have some other affect on it also? –  Ashwin Mar 31 '13 at 1:58

float them all left

make sure a width is specified that they can all fit in their container (either another div or the window), otherwise they will wrap

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<br style="clear: left;" />

that code that someone posted up there, it did the trick!!! when i paste it just before closing the Container DIV, it helps clear all subsequent DIVs from overlapping with the DIVs i've created side-by-side at the top!

<div>
<div class="left"></div>
<div class="left"></div>
...
...
<div class="left"></div>
<!--  then magic trick comes here  -->
<br style="clear: left;" />
</div>

tadaa!! :)

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I usually just float the first to the left, the second to the right. The third automatically aligns between them then.

<div style="float: left;">Column 1</div>
<div style="float: right;">Column 3</div>
<div>Column 2</div>
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Does't that cause mess-ups when the browser is resized? –  Imray Mar 7 at 13:57
<style>
.left-column
{
float:left;
width:30%;
background-color:red;
}
.right-column
{
float:right;
width:30%;
background-color:green;
}
.center-column
{
margin:auto;
width:30%;
background-color:blue;
}
</style>

<div id="container">
<section class="left-column">THIS IS COLUMN 1 LEFT</section>
<section class="right-column">THIS IS COLUMN 3 RIGHT</section>
<section class="center-column">THIS IS COLUMN 2 CENTER</section>
</div>

the advantage of this way is you can set each column width independant of the other as long as you keep it under 100%, if you use 3 x 30% the remaining 10% is split as a 5% divider space between the collumns

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you can float: left for all of them and set the width to 33.333%

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try to add "display: block" to the style

<style>
   .left{
          display: block;
          float:left; 
          width:33%;
    }
</style>


<div class="left">...</div>
<div class="left">...</div>
<div class="left">...</div>
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I prefer this method, floats are poorly supported in older versions of IE (really?...)

.column-left{ position:absolute; left: 0px; width: 33.3%; background: red; }
.column-right{position:absolute; left:66.6%; width: 33.3%; background: green; }
.column-center{ position:absolute; left:33.3%; width: 33.3%; background: yellow; }

UPDATED Of course, to use this technique and due to the absolute positioning you need to enclose the divs on a container and do a postprocessing to define the height of if, something like this: – jpbourbon Aug 28 at 13:50

jQuery(document).ready(function(){ jQuery('.main').height(Math.max(jQuery('.column-left').height(),jQuery('.column‌​-right').height(),jQuery('.column-center').height())); }); Not the most amazing thing in the world, but at least doesn't break on older IEs. – jpbourbon Aug 28 at 13:51

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Of course, to use this technique and due to the absolute positioning you need to enclose the divs on a container and do a postprocessing to define the height of if, something like this: –  jpbourbon Aug 28 at 13:50
    
jQuery(document).ready(function(){ jQuery('.main').height(Math.max(jQuery('.column-left').height(),jQuery('.column‌​-right').height(),jQuery('.column-center').height())); }); Not the most amazing thing in the world, but at least doesn't break on older IEs. –  jpbourbon Aug 28 at 13:51

Float all three divs to the left. Like here:

.first-div {
  width:370px;
  height:150px;
  float:left;
  background-color:pink;
}

.second-div {
  width:370px;
  height:150px;
  float:left;
  background-color:blue;
}

.third-div {
  width:370px;
  height:150px;
  float:left;
  background-color:purple;
}
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Welcome to SO! While this might be a true and valid answer, what's the point? There're already several other answers to this old question which all have the same information, plus some explanation. As a new user, try to focus on asking good question or providing good answers where those are still missing. –  cfi Oct 17 at 17:19
    
The point is that my answer is the most correct one and when a new person will be searching this Q on internet they will come across my answer which would be the most helpful for them. –  Arwen Oct 17 at 20:18
    
That may be. But it lacks any explanation. It is ok on this site to copy other answers, merging multiple partial answers into one combined better answer. You could edit and complete yours. However new users have a few restrictions (upvoting, few links), so I'd still recommend to not focus on old and answered questions. –  cfi Oct 18 at 5:57
    
@cfi thank you, I will keep it for future reference. –  Arwen Oct 18 at 22:28

Here's how I managed to do something similar to this inside a <footer> element:

<div class="content-wrapper">

    <div style="float:left">
        <p>&copy; 2012 - @DateTime.Now.Year @Localization.ClientName</p>
    </div>

    <div style="float:right">
        <p>@Localization.DevelopedBy <a href="http://leniel.net" target="_blank">Leniel Macaferi</a></p>
    </div>

    <div style="text-align:center;">
        <p>☎ (24) 3347-3110 | (24) 8119-1085&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;✉ @Html.ActionLink(Localization.Contact, MVC.Home.ActionNames.Contact, MVC.Home.Name)</p>
    </div>

</div>

CSS:

.content-wrapper
{
    margin: 0 auto;
    max-width: 1216px;
}
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@Leniel this method is good but you need to add width to all the floating div's. I would say make them equal width or assign fixed width. Something like

.content-wrapper > div { width:33.3%; }

you may assign class names to each div rather than adding inline style, which is not a good practice.

Be sure to use a clearfix div or clear div to avoid following content remains below these div's.

You can find details of how to use clearfix div here

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