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Does anyone have a good approach for generating a daily summary from a table containing intervals of times given by start and stop dates (where a null stop means continues indefinitely)?

The best way to describe the problem is with an example. Imagine a database tracking schedules for workers at a restaurant, where employees are hired and fired frequently. Sometimes employees might come back and get rehired.

Given a table with one row for each employee like the following:

position,name,start,end
bottle washer,Fred,1/2/2013,1/5/2013
bottle washer,Barney,1/4/2013,1/7/2013
bottle washer,Betty,1/10/2013,
bottle washer,Wilma,1/12/2013,1/13/2013
cook,Bilbo,1/1/2013,1/3/2013
cook,Frodo,1/5/2013,1/8/2013
cook,Bilbo,1/7/2013

I'm looking for a query that produces one row for each day/position giving the staffing level for that day, as in:

position,date,staffing
bottle washer,1/1/2013,0
bottle washer,1/2/2013,1
bottle washer,1/3/2013,1
bottle washer,1/4/2013,2
bottle washer,1/5/2013,2
bottle washer,1/6/2013,1
bottle washer,1/7/2013,1
bottle washer,1/8/2013,0
bottle washer,1/9/2013,0
bottle washer,1/10/2013,1
bottle washer,1/11/2013,1
bottle washer,1/12/2013,2
bottle washer,1/13/2013,2
bottle washer,1/14/2013,1
bottle washer,1/15/2013,1
cook,1/1/2013,1
cook,1/2/2013,1
cook,1/3/2013,1
cook,1/4/2013,0
cook,1/5/2013,1
cook,1/6/2013,1
cook,1/7/2013,2
cook,1/8/2013,2
cook,1/9/2013,1
cook,1/10/2013,1
cook,1/11/2013,1
cook,1/12/2013,1
cook,1/13/2013,1
cook,1/14/2013,1
cook,1/15/2013,1

I realize that I could solve this problem by writing procedural code on the client side or a stored procedure on the server side, but it would simplify alot of things to use a single SQL query. It would be fine if it were a complicated query or if it used windowing or analytic functions. At the moment, we're using Oracle if that matters.

Any suggestions on good approaches?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A partition outer join can help fill in calendar data. It is similar to a cross join but may perform much better with non-trivial table sizes.

A cross join will join every row in set A with every row in set B.

A partition outer join will join every row in set A with every defined subset in set B.

The example below generates the date range only based on the schedule data you provided. Therefore the 14th and 15th do not show up, but that can be easy to fix.

with schedules as
(
    --Schedule data.
    select 'bottle washer' position, 'Fred'   name, date '2013-01-02' startdate, date '2013-01-05' enddate from dual union all
    select 'bottle washer' position, 'Barney' name, date '2013-01-04' startdate, date '2013-01-07' enddate from dual union all
    select 'bottle washer' position, 'Betty'  name, date '2013-01-10' startdate, null              enddate from dual union all
    select 'bottle washer' position, 'Wilma'  name, date '2013-01-12' startdate, date '2013-01-13' enddate from dual union all
    select 'cook'          position, 'Bilbo'  name, date '2013-01-01' startdate, date '2013-01-03' enddate from dual union all
    select 'cook'          position, 'Frodo'  name, date '2013-01-05' startdate, date '2013-01-08' enddate from dual union all
    select 'cook'          position, 'Bilbo'  name, date '2013-01-07' startdate, null              enddate from dual
),
dates as
(
    --Date range, based on schedule data.
    select first_startdate + level - 1 the_date
    from
    (
        select min(startdate) first_startdate
            ,(max(enddate) - min(startdate))+1 date_diff
        from schedules
    )
    connect by level <= date_diff
)
--Count of staff working per position, per day.
select position, the_date, count(schedules.startdate) staffing
from dates
left join schedules partition by (position)
    on dates.the_date between schedules.startdate
        and nvl(schedules.enddate, date '9999-12-31')
group by position, the_date
order by position, the_date;
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1  
+1 Learned about partition outer join –  Rachcha Feb 6 at 0:36

I have used a CTE with the sample data that you have provided. I have also changed a few column names to allow me to execute the query. The example is as follows:

WITH tbl AS
         (SELECT 'bottle washer' AS position,
                 'Fred' AS name,
                 to_date ('01/02/2013', 'mm/dd/yyyy') AS startdate,
                 to_date ('01/05/2013', 'mm/dd/yyyy') AS enddate
            FROM dual
          UNION ALL
          SELECT 'bottle washer',
                 'Barney',
                 to_date ('01/04/2013', 'mm/dd/yyyy'),
                 to_date ('01/07/2013', 'mm/dd/yyyy')
            FROM dual
          UNION ALL
          SELECT 'bottle washer',
                 'Betty',
                 to_date ('01/10/2013', 'mm/dd/yyyy'),
                 NULL
            FROM dual
          UNION ALL
          SELECT 'bottle washer',
                 'Wilma',
                 to_date ('01/12/2013', 'mm/dd/yyyy'),
                 to_date ('01/13/2013', 'mm/dd/yyyy')
            FROM dual
          UNION ALL
          SELECT 'cook',
                 'Bilbo',
                 to_date ('01/01/2013', 'mm/dd/yyyy'),
                 to_date ('01/03/2013', 'mm/dd/yyyy')
            FROM dual
          UNION ALL
          SELECT 'cook',
                 'Frodo',
                 to_date ('01/05/2013', 'mm/dd/yyyy'),
                 to_date ('01/08/2013', 'mm/dd/yyyy')
            FROM dual
          UNION ALL
          SELECT 'cook',
                 'Bilbo',
                 to_date ('01/07/2013', 'mm/dd/yyyy'),
                 NULL
            FROM dual),
     daterange AS
         (    SELECT to_date ('01-JAN-2013') + rownum - 1 AS dd
                FROM dual
          CONNECT BY rownum <= 15
          START WITH rownum = 1)
  SELECT t.position,
         to_char(d.dd, 'mm/dd/yyyy') as "date",
         count (
             CASE
                 WHEN     t.enddate IS NOT NULL
                      AND d.dd BETWEEN t.startdate AND t.enddate THEN
                     1
                 WHEN t.enddate IS NULL AND d.dd >= t.startdate THEN
                     1
                 ELSE
                     NULL
             END)
             AS staffing
    FROM tbl t CROSS JOIN daterange d
GROUP BY t.position, d.dd
ORDER BY t.position, d.dd;

OUTPUT:

POSITION         DATE          STAFFING
---------------- ------------- ---------
bottle washer    01/01/2013    0
bottle washer    01/02/2013    1
bottle washer    01/03/2013    1
bottle washer    01/04/2013    2
bottle washer    01/05/2013    2
bottle washer    01/06/2013    1
bottle washer    01/07/2013    1
bottle washer    01/08/2013    0
bottle washer    01/09/2013    0
bottle washer    01/10/2013    1
bottle washer    01/11/2013    1
bottle washer    01/12/2013    2
bottle washer    01/13/2013    2
bottle washer    01/14/2013    1
bottle washer    01/15/2013    1
cook             01/01/2013    1
cook             01/02/2013    1
cook             01/03/2013    1
cook             01/04/2013    0
cook             01/05/2013    1
cook             01/06/2013    1
cook             01/07/2013    2
cook             01/08/2013    2
cook             01/09/2013    1
cook             01/10/2013    1
cook             01/11/2013    1
cook             01/12/2013    1
cook             01/13/2013    1
cook             01/14/2013    1
cook             01/15/2013    1
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1  
+1 But that cross join may get very expensive over time. Perhaps a partition outer join would work well here. –  Jon Heller Feb 5 at 5:20
    
@joearles: This cross join exists solely because we have to generate a date range over a period and join it with the main table without any condition. This is a requirement here. It would be even better if the OP has a daterange table, so we can cross join with that. –  Rachcha Feb 5 at 6:44
    
See my answer for an explanation. –  Jon Heller Feb 5 at 18:57

I have always had a calendar table in all my databases (with fiscal reporting periods etc in) so would utilise this and haven't had to figure out an alternative. If you are able to have one the below would work (tested in MS Access and would work in SQL Server, sorry I don't have Oracle but it's straight forward SQL)

Assume you have a calendar table tblCal that has at least a CalDate field - datetime.

SELECT tblEmps.Position,tblCal.CalDate,count(tblEmps.Name) As Pos
FROM tblCal INNER JOIN 
    tblEmps On (tblCal.CalDate >= tblEmps.Start And tblCal.CalDate <= tblEmps.End)
GROUP BY tblEmps.Position,tblCal.CalDate

EDIT

To include all dates and counts of 0:

SELECT a.Dt,a.Position,COALESCE(b.Pos,0) As Staff
FROM (SELECT tblCal.Dt, tblEmps.Position FROM tblCal, tblEmps) As a
    LEFT JOIN (SELECT tblEmps.Position, tblCal.CalDate, count(tblEmps.Name) As Pos
        FROM tblCal INNER JOIN 
            tblEmps On (tblCal.CalDate >= tblEmps.Start And tblCal.CalDate <= 
                tblEmps.End)
        GROUP BY tblEmps.Position,tblCal.CalDate) As b
    ON (a.Dt = b.Dt And a.Position = b.Position)

Obviously assumes that all positions required in the query have at some point had an employee.

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Won't this skip days for which there is no one in the position? A principal goal of this query is to identify gaps in staffing. –  Alex Blakemore Feb 7 at 14:41
    
Yes, you are correct. Please see edited answer to negate this, still using the calendar table, not sure if this overlaps some of the above answers, I haven't had time to digest all of them (new to some of the methods and too busy to read up on them at present) –  Simon1979 Feb 10 at 3:26

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