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For instance, I have app.js to have a Module object:M by loading(require) a file:_core.js, then properties of M are to add by loading(require) files under a directory: ./Project_Functions/

var Project_FunctionsDIR = './Project_Functions/';
var Project_coreFile = '_core.js';

var M = require(Project_FunctionsDIR + Project_coreFile);

require("fs")
  .readdir(Project_FunctionsDIR,
    function(err, files)
    {
      files.forEach(function(file)
      {
        if (file !== Project_coreFile)
        {
          var name = file.split('.js')[0]; 
          var filepath = Project_FunctionsDIR + file;
          M[name] = require(filepath); 
        }
      });
    });
console.log('module.exports');
module.exports = M;

Here, the constructed moduleObject:M is exported by module.exports.

Please note the fs.readdir is async, so module.exports = M; is evaluated before M properties are constructed in app.js.

Now, I want to test this object M in test.js,

var expect = require('chai').expect;

var M = require('./app.js');
//........

On var M = require('./app.js'); line, the app.js is evaluated, which indicates that the M object is exported before the whole properties are constructed.

In fact, I inserted setTimeout at the fs.readdir callback, the test fails obviously the M object is not ready yet.

Firstly, I thought module.exports = M; should be put within the fs.readdir callback, but if I do that, now var M = require(Project_FunctionsDIR + Project_coreFile); part fails, probably because module.exports = M; is not exposed to read properly.

Yes, this can be resolved simply by using fs.readdirSync and actually, I have been doing so when I encounter this sort of problem, however, I always feel uncomfortable to use node Sync methods and rather try to seek a smarter work-around.

So, here's my question; is it possible by not using Sync method for this issue? or impossible?

Furthermore, I'd like to ask more in general.

Can we do anything without using Sync methods, or in some cases, we must use Sync methods in node.js?

In functional programming scheme, Sync methods should be avoided if possible since the Sync concept depends on not function(callback) but time.

Thanks for your thought.


EDIT:

I've just found a related topic here: Asynchronous initialization of Node.js module

The conclusion is we must use Sync method to correspond a Sync method. In this case, require is a sync method.

share|improve this question
1  
you can have your test wait, or you can use sync methods. Since require itself is sync, i don't see this a cardinal sin if it's only done during boot, since that won't affect ultimate performance or capacity. –  dandavis Feb 5 '14 at 2:41
    
Thanks, I have another answer to suggest require is sync, so impossible to use async. –  Ken OKABE Feb 5 '14 at 2:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A common pattern is for the module to expose an asynchronous initialize method that does the asynchronous work. For your module, it would look like this:

var Project_FunctionsDIR = './Project_Functions/';
var Project_coreFile = '_core.js';

var M = require(Project_FunctionsDIR + Project_coreFile);

M.initialize = function(next) {
  require("fs")
  .readdir(Project_FunctionsDIR,
    function(err, files)
    {
      files.forEach(function(file)
      {
        if (file !== Project_coreFile)
        {
          var name = file.split('.js')[0]; 
          var filepath = Project_FunctionsDIR + file;
          M[name] = require(filepath); 
        }
      });
      next();
    });
}
module.exports = M;

Then you can test it with:

var M = require('./app.js');
M.initialize(function() {
  //........
}

This is a useful pattern because many asynchronous methods don't have synchronous versions, and it allows you to run many of these asynchronous initializes in parallel, drastically reducing startup time for larger apps.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand the principle completely thanks to you. This is surely very promising, but for strange unknown reason, I could not reach the callback from fs.readdir in test.js file.. I could invoke whole from the same app.js file by calling initialize(...), so I'm investigating now. –  Ken OKABE Feb 5 '14 at 4:51
    
Ok, it's an async issue of the testing framework(Mocha), this is the great way to deal with sync method with async. Appreciated! –  Ken OKABE Feb 5 '14 at 5:04

node.js uses CommonJS module pattern, which by definition export their exposed objects synchronously on load. What you're trying to do is not possible asynchronously, although you can do it just by exposing the other files into your 'main' export. If you want to dynamically expose all files in a directory from one object, just use the synchronous readdir, it'll only be executed on start up.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I confirmed that. I will edit my Q with a related topic I've just found. –  Ken OKABE Feb 5 '14 at 2:45
1  
What you can do is expose an object (module.exports = anObj), and asynchronously populate that object in your async readdir. And those properties are available elsewhere. But then you don't know when those properties exist elsewhere, other than doing setTimeout checks and waiting. This is ugly and a huge bad code smell, though. –  jsantell Feb 5 '14 at 2:47
    
All right, basically I would give up to stick to async for such a sync method require. Thank you for the advice. –  Ken OKABE Feb 5 '14 at 3:06
    
Thank you for your answer again. I've got a good alternative solution here, so I switched the Check, sorry for that. –  Ken OKABE Feb 5 '14 at 5:02

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