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Is it possible to write a template

Foo<int n>

such that:

Foo<2>

gives

switch(x) {
  case 1: return 1; break;
  case 2: return 4; break;
}

while

Foo<3>

gives

switch(x) {
  case 1: return 1; break;
  case 2: return 4; break;
  case 3: return 9; break;
}

?

Thanks!

EDIT:

changed code above to return square, as many have guessed (and I poorly asked)

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Is it really for computing a square? (And discarding it.) –  UncleBens Jan 28 '10 at 19:12
    
What are 1, 4 and 9 in your example? Should that be the 'return value' of the switch? Or do you mean something else? –  wich Jan 28 '10 at 19:13
1  
C++ templates have often been compared to fancy macros and can often replace traditional macros for some applications, but they aren't macro preprocessors. Also, since there's no observable behavior from your switch statements, the examples you posted probably aren't great examples of what you might really be looking to achieve. You might want to describe what your overall goal is - it might be possible to have templates do what you want, just not in the way you might be thinking about at the moment. –  Michael Burr Jan 28 '10 at 19:16
    
btw you dont need those break s after a return statement. –  smerlin Jan 28 '10 at 22:21
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, make a template with an oversized master switch and hope/help the optimizer turns it into a little switch. See my answer to your other question http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2157149/runtime-typeswitch-for-typelists-as-a-switch-instead-of-a-nested-ifs. Also, don't duplicate-post.

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You won't be able to use template metaprogramming to evaluate the result of the switch if the value you're switching on (in this case, x) is not known at compile time. This is because templates are blown-out at compile-time, not at run time.

However, if you know the value at compile-time, you can achieve a similar effect:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template<int V> struct intswitch
{
    operator int() const
    {
        return V * V;
    }
};

int main() {

    cout << "1 = " << intswitch<1>() << endl
        << "2 = " << intswitch<2>() << endl
        << "3 = " << intswitch<3>() << endl
        << "4 = " << intswitch<4>() << endl
        << "5 = " << intswitch<5>() << endl
        << "6 = " << intswitch<6>() << endl
        << "7 = " << intswitch<7>() << endl
        << "8 = " << intswitch<8>() << endl
        << "9 = " << intswitch<9>() << endl
        << "10 = " << intswitch<10>() << endl
        ;
}

Program output:

1 = 1
2 = 4
3 = 9
4 = 16
5 = 25
6 = 36
7 = 49
8 = 64
9 = 81
10 = 100
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Sort-a, kind-a, not really. You can get something close to the behavior you are asking for although not done with an actual switch.

Okay, I'm assuming foo<N> means the ability to calculate the square of any value between 1 and N but no other values. So, I came up with this:

template <int t>
int foo(int x)
{
    return (x > t)   ? -1 :
           (x == t)  ? (x * x) :
                       foo<t -1>(x);
}    

template <>
int foo<0>(int x)
{
    return -1;
}
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The runtime complexity is... bad. Why using another template if x < t ? In the end, as long as x is in [0,t] you'll get x*x as a result, no need to go recursive there. –  Matthieu M. Jan 29 '10 at 7:41
    
Neat answer. It's like a linear lookup time switch, but clever. –  Inverse Jan 5 '11 at 17:38
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No, you will need a lookup table for something like that mate.

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I don't believe you are actually looking for templates here, but rather macros. Try this reference for info on the C preprocessor, which may be able to do what you want. Templates work on types, and aren't suited to what you are trying to do.

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I'm not a C++ expert, but I believe templates can work on values. That's why the typename keyword exists: to create templates that work on types. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 28 '10 at 19:15
    
Indeed, for example to compute a square at compile-time template <int N> struct square { static const int value = N * N; }. They don't generate normal switches, although it might be possible to set up a compile-time switch with template meta-programming (loops and if's are doable, so I don't see why a switch shouldn't be) - but it is hard to see what the OP wants to achieve in the first place. –  UncleBens Jan 28 '10 at 19:19
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