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I have made some changes to a file which has been committed a few times as part of a group of files, but now want to reset/revert the changes on it back to a previous version.

I have done a git log along with a git diff to find the revision I need, but just have no idea how to get the file back to its former state in the past.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

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1  
This question is duplicated by Reverting a single file to a previous version in git. –  Cupcake May 30 at 4:59

21 Answers 21

up vote 1212 down vote accepted

Assuming the commit you want is abcde:

git checkout abcde file/to/restore

The git checkout man page gives more information.

As a side note, I've always been uncomfortable with this command because it's used for both ordinary things (changing between branches) and unusual destructive things (discarding changes in the working directory).

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229  
If you messed up in "abbcdf" and want the version right before "abbcdf", you can do git checkout "abbcdf~1" path/to/file. –  shadowhand Mar 1 '11 at 0:13
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@shadowhand: Is there a way to reverse that, so it's the version right after? –  aliteralmind Apr 29 at 12:57
4  
@aliteralmind: No, unfortunately the Git history shortcut notation only goes backwards in history. –  Greg Hewgill Apr 29 at 18:02
4  
On practical level you need to first find out when and how the file has changed to choose the right commit you want to use (abcde). To do that use git log file/to/restore or if the file changes a lot git log --abbrev-commit --pretty=oneline file/to/restore to see the history of this file only. –  gorn Aug 2 at 22:39

You can quickly review the changes made to a file using the diff command:

git diff <commit hash> <filename>

Then to revert a specific file to that commit use the reset command:

git reset <commit hash> <filename>

You may need to use the --hard option if you have local modifications.

A good workflow for managaging waypoints is to use tags to cleanly mark points in your timeline. I can't quite understand your last sentence but what you may want is diverge a branch from a previous point in time. To do this, use the handy checkout command:

git checkout <commit hash>
git checkout -b <new branch name>

You can then rebase that against your mainline when you are ready to merge those changes:

git checkout <my branch>
git rebase master
git checkout master
git merge <my branch>
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5  
'git checkout <commit hash>' command has given me back my older version of the project exactly this for which I was searching Thanks Chris. –  vidur punj Jan 27 '13 at 9:26
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'git reset <commit hash> <filename>' didn't change my specific file I wanted to change. Is there a way to checkout the version of the file, specifically, and not checkout the entire project? –  Danny Feb 20 '13 at 1:18
10  
To revert the file git checkout <commit hash> <filename> worked better for me than git reset –  Motti Strom Mar 7 '13 at 16:53
    
I wanted an early version of a single file because I had overwritten 150 lines with a badly chosen copy/paste. git checkout <commit hash> <filename> worked for me. This should not be the accepted answer, IMHO. git reset did not. –  harperville Feb 27 at 20:58

You can use any reference to a git commit, including the SHA-1 if that's most convenient. The point is that the command looks like this:

git checkout [commit-ref] -- [filename]

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git checkout -- foo

That will reset foo to HEAD. You can also:

git checkout HEAD^ foo

for one revision back, etc.

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2  
I'd suggest using syntax git checkout -- foo to avoid any mistakes if foo is anything special (like a directory or a file called -f). With git, if you're unsure, always prefix all files and directories with the special argument --. –  Mikko Rantalainen Mar 18 '13 at 7:22
    
@MikkoRantalainen: Thanks, I wrote this answer when I was still new to Git myself! –  Greg Hewgill Mar 18 '13 at 7:47
    
This also applies to folders, not just files. –  David Feb 19 at 23:35

I had the same issue just now and I found this answer easiest to understand (commit-ref is the SHA value of the change in the log you want to go back to):

git checkout [commit-ref] [filename]

This will put that old version in your working directory and from there you can commit it if you want.

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And to revert to last committed version, which is most frequently needed, you can use this simpler command.

git checkout HEAD file/to/restore
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If you know how many commits you need to go back, you can use:

git checkout master~5 image.png

This assumes that you're on the master branch, and the version you want is 5 commits back.

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I think I've found it....from http://www-cs-students.stanford.edu/~blynn/gitmagic/ch02.html

Sometimes you just want to go back and forget about every change past a certain point because they're all wrong.

Start with:

$ git log

which shows you a list of recent commits, and their SHA1 hashes.

Next, type:

$ git reset --hard SHA1_HASH

to restore the state to a given commit and erase all newer commits from the record permanently.

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18  
Git never removes anything. Your old commits are still there but unless there is a branch tip pointing at them they are not reachable anymore. git reflog will still show them until you clean your repository with git-gc. –  Bombe Dec 17 '08 at 9:15
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@Bombe: Thank you for the information. I had checked out an old version of a file. After reading your comment, I was able to use "gitref" to lookup the partial SHA1 hash, and use "checkout" to get back to the most recent version. Other git users might find this information helpful. –  Winston C. Yang May 19 '10 at 14:53
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possibly followed by a git push --force –  bshirley Apr 18 '12 at 21:47
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If you have uncommitted changes, you will loose them if do a git reset --hard –  Boklucius Apr 24 '12 at 15:30
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@Bombe - "Git never removes anything. Your old commits are still there but unless there is a branch tip pointing at them they are not reachable anymore." - but commits like this are pruned after some set time, so "Git never removes anything" is untrue. –  Bulwersator Apr 29 at 7:07

This worked for me:

git checkout <commit hash> file

Then commit the change:

git commit -a
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3  
Thank you for the simple solution - "I just want to grab an old version and commit it as the latest version"! –  Jason Sep 1 '11 at 16:49
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Thank you. This worked for me too! The answer with "git reset <commit hash> <filename>" didn't work. –  kakyo Jan 14 '13 at 14:35

You have to be careful when you say "rollback". If you used to have one version of a file in commit $A, and then later made two changes in two separate commits $B and $C (so what you are seeing is the third iteration of the file), and if you say "I want to roll back to the first one", do you really mean it?

If you want to get rid of the changes both the second and the third iteration, it is very simple:

$ git checkout $A file

and then you commit the result. The command asks "I want to check out the file from the state recorded by the commit $A".

On the other hand, what you meant is to get rid of the change the second iteration (i.e. commit $B) brought in, while keeping what commit $C did to the file, you would want to revert $B

$ git revert $B

Note that whoever created commit $B may not have been very disciplined and may have committed totally unrelated change in the same commit, and this revert may touch files other than file you see offending changes, so you may want to check the result carefully after doing so.

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Amusingly, 'git checkout foo' will not work if the working copy is in a directory named foo; however, both 'git checkout HEAD foo' and 'git checkout ./foo' will:

$ pwd
/Users/aaron/Documents/work/foo
$ git checkout foo
D   foo
Already on "foo"
$ git checkout ./foo
$ git checkout HEAD foo
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18  
or git checkout -- foo –  knittl Mar 7 '10 at 16:34
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I think I love Git so much because its UI has no surprises whatsoever and makes total sense, even to newbies. –  Benjamin Pollack Apr 21 '11 at 19:42
    
RE: "... if the working copy is in a directory named foo": Shouldn't this be "if the repository contains a ref named foo" (in your example case, a branch named foo)? git checkout works for me in a directory named foo if there's no ref of the same name. –  Max Nanasy Aug 30 '12 at 21:53
    
I realize now that @DamienDiederen already told you this in his answer. –  Max Nanasy Aug 30 '12 at 22:23

Here's how rebase works:

git checkout <my branch>
git rebase master
git checkout master
git merge <my branch>

Assume you have

---o----o----o----o  master
    \---A----B       <my branch>

The first two commands ... commit git checkout git rebase master

... check out the branch of changes you want to apply to the master branch. The rebase command takes the commits from <my branch> (that are not found in master) and reapplies them to the head of master. In other words, the parent of the first commit in <my branch> is no longer a previous commit in the master history, but the current head of master. The two commands are the same as:

git rebase master <my branch>

It might be easier to remember this command as both the "base" and "modify" branches are explicit.

. The final history result is:

---o----o----o----o   master
                   \----A'----B'  <my branch>

The final two commands ...

git checkout master
git merge <my branch>

... do a fast-forward merge to apply all <my branch> changes onto master. Without this step, the rebase commit does not get added to master. The final result is:

---o----o----o----o----A'----B'  master, <my branch>

master and <my branch> both reference B'. Also, from this point it is safe to delete the <my branch> reference.

git branch -d <my branch>
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I have to plug EasyGit here, which is a wrapper to make git more approachable to novices without confusing seasoned users. One of the things it does is give more meanings to git revert. In this case, you would simply say:

eg revert foo/bar foo/baz

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Note, however, that git checkout ./foo and git checkout HEAD ./foo are not exactly the same thing; case in point:

$ echo A > foo
$ git add foo
$ git commit -m 'A' foo
Created commit a1f085f: A
1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
create mode 100644 foo
$ echo B >> foo
$ git add foo
$ echo C >> foo
$ cat foo
A
B
C
$ git checkout ./foo
$ cat foo
A
B
$ git checkout HEAD ./foo
$ cat foo
A

(The second add stages the file in the index, but it does not get committed.)

Git checkout ./foo means revert path ./foo from the index; adding HEAD instructs Git to revert that path in the index to its HEAD revision before doing so.

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Obviously someone either needs to write an intelligible book on git, or git needs to be better explained in the documentation. Faced with this same problem I guessed that

cd <working copy>
git revert master

would undo the last commit which is seemed to do.

Ian

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Use git log to obtain the hash key for specific version and then use git checkout <hashkey>

Note: Do not forget to type the hash before the last one. Last hash points your current position (HEAD) and changes nothing.

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git checkout ref|commitHash -- filePath

e.g.

git checkout HEAD~5 -- foo.bar
or 
git checkout 048ee28 -- foo.bar
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In order to go to a previous commit version of the file, get the commit number, say eb917a1 then

git checkout eb917a1 YourFileName

If you just need to go back to the last commited version

git reset HEAD YourFileName
git checkout YourFileName

This will simply take you to the last committed state of the file

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git revert <hash>

Will revert a given commit. It sounds like you think git revert only affects the most recent commit.

That doesn't solve your problem, if you want to revert a change in a specific file and that commit changed more than that file.

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In the case that you want to revert a file to a previous commit (and the file you want to revert already committed) you can use

git checkout HEAD^1 path/to/file

or

git checkout HEAD~1 path/to/file

Then just stage and commit the "new" version.

Armed with the knowledge that a commit can have two parents in the case of a merge, you should know that HEAD^1 is the first parent and HEAD~1 is the second parent.

Either will work if there is only one parent in the tree.

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You can go back to the previous version by right clicking the document -> Restore previous versions -> Previous Versions and select the date you want to go back to.

Hope this helps!

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I don't think this is a valid solution, since the question asker seems to be using the Gid command line instead of a graphical userinterface. –  Tim Visée Jul 16 at 7:42
    
Yes, you are right....it is just an alternative solution. –  user3843915 Jul 21 at 6:20
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-1 Please specify which program these instructions apply to. –  Bennett McElwee Aug 27 at 2:16

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