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I would like to run a query like

select ... as days where `date` is between '2010-01-20' and '2010-01-24'

And return data like:

days
----------
2010-01-20
2010-01-21
2010-01-22
2010-01-23
2010-01-24
share|improve this question
6  
What is the the problem you are trying to solve? If you just need a list of dates you don't need to go to the database. –  Mark Byers Jan 28 '10 at 19:26
5  
There is no other problem attached to this question. The above question is the problem, mastering SQL courses. –  Pentium10 Jan 28 '10 at 19:30
1  
This isn't a real question. –  Derek Adair Jan 28 '10 at 19:30
2  
There is no other problem attached to this question. The above question is the problem, mastering SQL courses. –  Pentium10 Jan 28 '10 at 19:32
4  
An example for its use would be to generate statistics, and include a row for dates you have no data on. If you are doing some sort of group-by it can be much quicker to actually generate all the information in SQL and add it into whatever format you need, instead of dumping your data as-is to your language, and start looping and adding your empties. –  Nanne Jul 24 '13 at 14:57

13 Answers 13

up vote 98 down vote accepted

This solution uses no loops, procedures, or temp tables. The subquery generates dates for the last thousand days, and could be extended to go as far back or forward as you wish.

select a.Date 
from (
    select curdate() - INTERVAL (a.a + (10 * b.a) + (100 * c.a)) DAY as Date
    from (select 0 as a union all select 1 union all select 2 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 union all select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9) as a
    cross join (select 0 as a union all select 1 union all select 2 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 union all select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9) as b
    cross join (select 0 as a union all select 1 union all select 2 union all select 3 union all select 4 union all select 5 union all select 6 union all select 7 union all select 8 union all select 9) as c
) a
where a.Date between '2010-01-20' and '2010-01-24' 

Output:

Date
----------
2010-01-24
2010-01-23
2010-01-22
2010-01-21
2010-01-20

Notes on Performance

Testing it out here, the performance is surprisingly good: the above query takes 0.0009 sec.

If we extend the subquery to generate approx. 100,000 numbers (and thus about 274 years worth of dates), it runs in 0.0458 sec.

Incidentally, this is a very portable technique that works with most databases with minor adjustments.

SQL Fiddle example returning 1,000 days

share|improve this answer
47  
+1 for one of the most surreal queries I've ever seen. –  Lluis Martinez Jan 28 '10 at 20:58
5  
You'll see better performance if you change UNION to UNION ALL - it's wasting time checking for duplicates to remove that don't exist. It's overcomplicated IMO though - if you're going to construct a resultset using UNIONs, why not just specify the date and be done with it? –  OMG Ponies Jan 28 '10 at 21:27
3  
why not just specify the date and be done with it - because the above method allows you to create arbitrarily large sets of numbers (and dates) requiring no table creation, that would be painful to hard-code in the manner you are suggesting. Obviously for 5 dates it is overkill; but even then, if you are joining against a table where you do not know the dates in advance, but just the potential min and max values, it makes sense. –  RedFilter Jan 28 '10 at 22:10
3  
Painful for a large number of dates. I am not sure you understand the query - as it is, it supports 1,000 dates. One more cross join bring it up to 10,000, etc. At any rate, one man's meat is another man's poison. –  RedFilter Jan 28 '10 at 23:18
10  
It's really nice to see an answer to the question, not endless comments how it cannot, or should not, be done. Most things can be done, and "should" is only meaningful in context, which differs for everyone. This answer helped me, even though I am well aware there are better ways in most situations. –  joe May 30 '12 at 0:58

Here is another variation using views:

CREATE VIEW digits AS
  SELECT 0 AS digit UNION ALL
  SELECT 1 UNION ALL
  SELECT 2 UNION ALL
  SELECT 3 UNION ALL
  SELECT 4 UNION ALL
  SELECT 5 UNION ALL
  SELECT 6 UNION ALL
  SELECT 7 UNION ALL
  SELECT 8 UNION ALL
  SELECT 9;

CREATE VIEW numbers AS
  SELECT
    ones.digit + tens.digit * 10 + hundreds.digit * 100 + thousands.digit * 1000 AS number
  FROM
    digits as ones,
    digits as tens,
    digits as hundreds,
    digits as thousands;

CREATE VIEW dates AS
  SELECT
    SUBDATE(CURRENT_DATE(), number) AS date
  FROM
    numbers;

And then you can simply do (see how elegant it is?):

SELECT
  date
FROM
  dates
WHERE
  date BETWEEN '2010-01-20' AND '2010-01-24'
ORDER BY
  date

Update

It is worth noting that you will only be able to generate past dates starting from the current date. If you want to generate any kind of dates range (past, future, and in between), you will have to use this view instead:

CREATE VIEW dates AS
  SELECT
    SUBDATE(CURRENT_DATE(), number) AS date
  FROM
    numbers
  UNION ALL
  SELECT
    ADDDATE(CURRENT_DATE(), number + 1) AS date
  FROM
    numbers;
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work in all the cases. SELECT date FROM dates WHERE date BETWEEN '2014-12-01' AND '2014-12-28' ORDER BY date –  vasanth Dec 7 '13 at 23:09
    
Good call @user927258. This is because the first view dates mentioned above computes the dates starting from the current date, which is why you won't be able to retrieve dates set in the future. Answer from @RedFilter suffers from the same design flaw. I have added a workaround in my answer though. –  Stéphane Dec 22 '13 at 21:09

Using a recursive Common Table Expression (CTE), you can generate a list of dates, then select from it. Obviously you normally wouldn't want to create three million dates, so the this just illustrates the possibilities. You could simply limit the date range inside the CTE and omit the where clause from the select statement using the CTE.

with [dates] as (
    select convert(datetime, '1753-01-01') as [date] --start
    union all
    select dateadd(day, 1, [date])
    from [dates]
    where [date] < '9999-12-31' --end
)
select [date]
from [dates]
where [date] between '2013-01-01' and '2013-12-31'
option (maxrecursion 0)

On Microsoft SQL Server 2005, generating the CTE list of all possible dates took 1:08. Generating one hundred years took less than a second.

share|improve this answer

thx Pentium10 - you made me join stackoverflow :) - this is my porting to msaccess - think it'll work on any version:

SELECT date_value
FROM (SELECT a.espr1+(10*b.espr1)+(100*c.espr1) AS integer_value,
dateadd("d",integer_value,dateserial([start_year], [start_month], [start_day])) as date_value
FROM (select * from 
    (
    select top 1 "0" as espr1 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "1" as espr2 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "2" as espr3 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "3" as espr4 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "4" as espr5 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "5" as espr6 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "6" as espr7 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "7" as espr8 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "8" as espr9 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "9" as espr9 from MSysObjects
    ) as a,
    (
    select top 1 "0" as espr1 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "1" as espr2 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "2" as espr3 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "3" as espr4 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "4" as espr5 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "5" as espr6 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "6" as espr7 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "7" as espr8 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "8" as espr9 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "9" as espr9 from MSysObjects
    ) as b,
    (
    select top 1 "0" as espr1 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "1" as espr2 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "2" as espr3 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "3" as espr4 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "4" as espr5 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "5" as espr6 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "6" as espr7 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "7" as espr8 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "8" as espr9 from MSysObjects
    union all
    select top 1 "9" as espr9 from MSysObjects
    ) as c   
)  as d) 
WHERE date_value 
between dateserial([start_year], [start_month], [start_day]) 
and dateserial([end_year], [end_month], [end_day]);

referenced MSysObjects just 'cause access need a table countin' at least 1 record, in a from clause - any table with at least 1 record would do.

share|improve this answer

The old school solution for doing this without a loop/cursor is to create a NUMBERS table, which has a single Integer column with values starting at 1.

CREATE TABLE  `example`.`numbers` (
  `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

You need to populate the table with enough records to cover your needs:

INSERT INTO NUMBERS (id) VALUES (NULL);

Once you have the NUMBERS table, you can use:

SELECT x.start_date + INTERVAL n.id-1 DAY
  FROM NUMBERS n
  JOIN (SELECT STR_TO_DATE('2010-01-20', '%Y-%m-%d') AS start_date 
          FROM DUAL) x
 WHERE x.start_date + INTERVAL n.id-1 DAY <= '2010-01-24'

The absolute low-tech solution would be:

SELECT STR_TO_DATE('2010-01-20', '%Y-%m-%d')
 FROM DUAL
UNION ALL
SELECT STR_TO_DATE('2010-01-21', '%Y-%m-%d')
 FROM DUAL
UNION ALL
SELECT STR_TO_DATE('2010-01-22', '%Y-%m-%d')
 FROM DUAL
UNION ALL
SELECT STR_TO_DATE('2010-01-23', '%Y-%m-%d')
 FROM DUAL
UNION ALL
SELECT STR_TO_DATE('2010-01-24', '%Y-%m-%d')
 FROM DUAL

What would you use it for?


To generate lists of dates or numbers in order to LEFT JOIN on to. You would to this in order to see where there are gaps in the data, because you are LEFT JOINing onto a list of sequencial data - null values will make it obvious where gaps exist.

share|improve this answer
    
what's dual ? –  Pentium10 Jan 28 '10 at 23:07
    
The DUAL table is supported by Oracle and MySQL to use as a stand-in table in the FROM clause. It doesn't exist, selecting values from it will return whatever the value is. The idea was to have the stand-in because a SELECT query requires a FROM clause specifying at least one table. –  OMG Ponies Jan 28 '10 at 23:17

For Access 2010 - multiple steps required; I followed the same pattern as posted above, but thought I could help someone in Access. Worked great for me, I didn't have to keep a seeded table of dates.

Create a table called DUAL (similar to how the Oracle DUAL table works)

  • ID (AutoNumber)
  • DummyColumn (Text)
  • Add one row values (1,"DummyRow")

Create a query named "ZeroThru9Q"; manually enter the following syntax:

select 0 as a from dual union all select 1 from dual union all select 2 from dual union all select 3 from dual union all select 4 from dual union all select 5 from dual union all select 6 from dual union all select 7 from dual union all select 8 from dual UNION ALL select 9 from dual;

Create a query named "TodayMinus1KQ" (for dates before today); manually enter the following syntax:

select date() - (a.a + (10 * b.a) + (100 * c.a)) AS MyDate from (select * from ZeroThru9Q) AS a, (Select * from ZeroThru9Q) AS b, (Select * from ZeroThru9Q) AS c

Create a query named "TodayPlus1KQ" (for dates after today); manually enter the following syntax:

select date() + (a.a + (10 * b.a) + (100 * c.a)) AS MyDate from (SELECT * FROM ZeroThru9Q) AS a, (SELECT * FROM ZeroThru9Q) AS b, (SELECT * FROM ZeroThru9Q) AS c;

Create a union query named "TodayPlusMinus1KQ" (for dates +/- 1000 days):

Select MyDate From TodayMinus1KQ UNION SELECT MyDate FROM TodayPlus1KQ;

Now you can use the query:

SELECT MyDate FROM TodayPlusMinus1KQ WHERE MyDate between #05/01/2014# and #05/30/2014#

share|improve this answer
    
THANK YOU!!! I was getting crazy because of the code above... +1 :D –  BBallBoy Jul 7 at 14:12

if you will ever need more then a couple days, you need a table.

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2149688/create-a-date-range-in-mysql

then,

select from days.day, count(mytable.field) as fields from days left join mytable on day=date where date between x and y;
share|improve this answer
2  
why have you posted this, since the above reply does not need a table and provides the solution? –  Pentium10 Jan 29 '10 at 13:44

Procedure + temporary table:

DELIMITER $$

CREATE DEFINER=`root`@`localhost` PROCEDURE `days`(IN dateStart DATE, IN dateEnd DATE)
BEGIN

    CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE IF NOT EXISTS date_range (day DATE);

    WHILE dateStart <= dateEnd DO
      INSERT INTO date_range VALUES (dateStart);
      SET dateStart = DATE_ADD(dateStart, INTERVAL 1 DAY);
    END WHILE;

    SELECT * FROM date_range;
    DROP TEMPORARY TABLE IF EXISTS date_range;

END
share|improve this answer

Alright.. Try this: http://www.devshed.com/c/a/MySQL/Delving-Deeper-into-MySQL-50/
http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/loop-statement.html
http://www.roseindia.net/sql/mysql-example/mysql-loop.shtml

Use that to, say, generate a temp table, and then do a select * on the temp table. Or output the results one at a time.
What you say you want to do can't be done with a SELECT statement, but it might be doable with things specific to MySQL.
Then again, maybe you need cursors: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/cursors.html

share|improve this answer
    
Loop sounds interesting –  Pentium10 Jan 28 '10 at 19:41

For Oracle, my solution is:

select trunc(sysdate-dayincrement, 'DD') 
  from dual, (select level as dayincrement 
                from dual connect by level <= 30)

Sysdate can be changed to specific date and level number can be changed to give more dates.

share|improve this answer

As stated (or at least alluded to) in many of the wonderful answers already given, this problem is easily solved once you have a set of numbers to work with.

Note: The following is T-SQL but it's simply my particular implementation of general concepts already mentioned here and on the internet at large. It should be relatively simple to convert the code to your dialect of choice.

How? Consider this query:

SELECT DATEADD(d, N, '0001-01-22')
FROM Numbers -- A table containing the numbers 0 through N
WHERE N <= 5;

The above produces the date range 1/22/0001 - 1/27/0001 and is extremely trivial. There are 2 key pieces of information in the above query: the start date of 0001-01-22 and the offset of 5. If we combine these two pieces of information then we obviously have our end date. Thus, given two dates, generating a range can be broken down like so:

  • Find the difference between two given dates (the offset), easy:

    -- Returns 125 SELECT ABS(DATEDIFF(d, '2014-08-22', '2014-12-25'))

    Using ABS() here ensures that the date order is irrelevant.

  • Generate a limited set of numbers, also easy:

    -- Returns the numbers 0-2 SELECT N = ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY (SELECT NULL)) - 1 FROM(SELECT 'A' AS S UNION ALL SELECT 'A' UNION ALL SELECT 'A')

    Notice we don't actually care what we're selecting FROM here. We just need a set to work with so that we count the number of rows in it. I personally use a TVF, some use a CTE, others use a numbers table instead, you get the idea. I advocate for using the most performant solution that you also understand.

Combining these two methods will solve our problem:

DECLARE @date1 DATE = '9001-11-21';
DECLARE @date2 DATE = '9001-11-23';

SELECT D = DATEADD(d, N, @date1)
FROM (
    SELECT N = ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY (SELECT NULL)) - 1
    FROM (SELECT 'A' AS S UNION ALL SELECT 'A' UNION ALL SELECT 'A') S
) Numbers
WHERE N <= ABS(DATEDIFF(d, @date1, @date2));

The above example is horrible code but demonstrates how everything comes together.

More Fun

I need to do this kind of thing a lot so I encapsulated the logic into two TVFs. The first generates a range of numbers and the second uses this functionality to generate a range of dates. The math is to ensure that input order doesn't matter and because I wanted to use the full range of numbers available in GenerateRangeSmallInt.

The following function takes ~16ms of CPU time to return the maximum range of 65536 dates.

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.GenerateRangeDate (   
    @date1 DATE,   
    @date2 DATE   
)   
RETURNS TABLE
WITH SCHEMABINDING   
AS   
RETURN (
    SELECT D = DATEADD(d, N + 32768, CASE WHEN @date1 <= @date2 THEN @date1 ELSE @date2 END)
    FROM dbo.GenerateRangeSmallInt(-32768, ABS(DATEDIFF(d, @date1, @date2)) - 32768)
);

GO

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.GenerateRangeSmallInt (
    @num1 SMALLINT = -32768
  , @num2 SMALLINT = 32767
)
RETURNS TABLE
WITH SCHEMABINDING
AS
RETURN (
    WITH Numbers(N) AS (
        SELECT N FROM(VALUES
            (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 16
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 32
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 48
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 64
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 80
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 96
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 112
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 128
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 144
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 160
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 176
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 192
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 208
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 224
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 240
          , (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1), (1) -- 256
        ) V (N)
    )
    SELECT TOP(ABS(CAST(@num1 AS INT) - CAST(@num2 AS INT)) + 1)
           N = ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY (SELECT NULL)) + CASE WHEN @num1 <= @num2 THEN @num1 ELSE @num2 END - 1
    FROM Numbers A
       , Numbers B
);
share|improve this answer

Generate dates between two date fields

If you are aware with SQL CTE query, then this solution will helps you to solve your question

Here is example

We have dates in one table

Table Name: “testdate”

STARTDATE   ENDDATE
10/24/2012  10/24/2012
10/27/2012  10/29/2012
10/30/2012  10/30/2012

Require Result:

STARTDATE
10/24/2012
10/27/2012
10/28/2012
10/29/2012
10/30/2012

Solution:

WITH CTE as
(
select distinct convert(varchar(10),StartTime , 101) as StartTime,datediff(dd,StartTime , endTime) as diff from dbo.testdate
UNION ALL
Select StartTime,diff - 1 as diff from CTE WHERE diff<> 0
)Select Distinct DateAdd(dd,diff, StartTime) as StartTime from CTE

Explanation: CTE Recursive query explanation

  • First part of query:

    select distinct convert(varchar(10), StartTime , 101) as StartTime ,datediff(dd, StartTime , endTime) as diff from dbo.testdate

    Explanation: firstcolumn is “startdate”, second column is difference of start and end date in days and it will be consider as “diff” column

  • Second part of query: UNION ALL Select StartTime,diff - 1 as diff from CTE WHERE diff<> 0

    Explanation: Union all will inherit result of above query until result goes null, So “StartTime” result is inherit from generated CTE query, and from diff, decrease - 1, so its looks like 3, 2, and 1 until 0

For example

STARTDATE   DIFF
10/24/2012  0
10/27/2012  0
10/27/2012  1
10/27/2012  2
10/30/2012  0

Result Specification

STARTDATE       Specification
10/24/2012  --> From Record 1
10/27/2012  --> From Record 2
10/27/2012  --> From Record 2
10/27/2012  --> From Record 2
10/30/2012  --> From Record 3
  • 3rd Part of Query

    Select Distinct DateAdd(dd,diff, StartTime) as StartTime from CTE

    It will add day “diff” in “startdate” so result should be as below

Result

STARTDATE
10/24/2012
10/27/2012
10/28/2012
10/29/2012
10/30/2012
share|improve this answer
    
-1 : Can't do a CTE in mysql. –  Hogan Feb 10 '13 at 16:33

You cannot do that in mysql alone. You should generate the range in your server-side language of choice.

share|improve this answer
    
agreed. This isn't a mysql question. There is no need to use mysql if there is no other data you are trying to get besides a date-range. –  Derek Adair Jan 28 '10 at 19:32
1  
it was a question for mastering SQL course. –  Pentium10 Jan 28 '10 at 19:37
5  
-1: Disagree, this can be done in MySQL alone. –  RedFilter Jan 28 '10 at 20:46

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