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I have been trying to combine two hashes in Ruby. For example:

h1 = { "a" => 10, "b" => 20, "c"=>34, "d"=>3}
h2 = { "a" => 11, "b" => 21, "d"=>15}

The output I would like is:

h{"a"=> 10, 11, "b"=>20,21, "c"=> 34, "d"=>3,15}

Each hash has the same key, except the second hash might be missing some. I would like the two values then to be represented by the same key.

This is my unsuccessful code:

h1 = { "a" => 10, "b" => 20, "c"=>34, "d"=>3}   
h2 = {  "a" => 11, "b" => 21, "d"=>15}  
h3= h1.update(h2){|key1, key2, val1, val2 |key1,h2_val=h2}

It gives:

{"a"=>{"a"=>11, "b"=>21, "d"=>15}, "b"=>{"a"=>11, "b"=>21, "d"=>15}, "c"=>34, "d"=>{"a"=>11, "b"=>21, "d"=>15}}

I am just new to Ruby so I assume I am missing something very basic here. I would appreciate any help.

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1  
The line: h{"a"=> 10, 11, "b"=>20,21, "c"=> 34, "d"=>3,15} is not valid Ruby code, it is not clear if it should be "c" => [34] or "c" => 34. Please, fix it. –  toro2k Feb 5 at 9:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What about:

h1 = { "a" => 10, "b" => 20, "c"=>34, "d"=>3} 
h2 = { "a" => 11, "b" => 21, "d"=>15}

p h1.merge(h2){|key, old, new| Array(old).push(new) } #=> {"a"=>[10, 11], "b"=>[20, 21], "c"=>34, "d"=>[3, 15]}

And this is how I would write it to combine more than 2 Hashes:

h1 = { "a" => 10, "b" => 20, "c"=>34, "d"=>3} 
h2 = { "a" => 11, "b" => 21, "d"=>15}
h3 = { "a" => 11, "b" => 21, "c"=> 1, "d"=>15}

merge_to_array = -> x,y { x.merge(y){|key, old, new| Array(old).push(new)} }

p [h1,h2,h3].reduce &merge_to_array #=> {"a"=>[10, 11, 11], "b"=>[20, 21, 21], "c"=>[34, 1], "d"=>[3, 15, 15]}
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That's the way to go, even though Array(old).push(new) it's the more convoluted way I've ever seen of writing [old, new] :) –  tokland Feb 5 at 9:53
    
Yes it is a bit weird indeed, the reason is that it is more generic. If you look at my second example with merging more than one hash the result of [old, new] would be [[[[1,2],3],4]] instead of [1,2,3,4] –  hirolau Feb 5 at 10:04
    
Ok, it's indeed necessary in the second snippet to flatten the result. –  tokland Feb 5 at 10:49
1  
[old, new].flatten would also work, or [*old]<<new Maybe that read better? –  hirolau Feb 5 at 12:45
    
Yeah, any of them (I prefer the first). Note though that this won't work if the values in the original hash are themselves arrays. This suggests that the types of the second snippet are a bit shaky (we'd need probably another abstraction, Hash#merge works well only for 2 hashes). –  tokland Feb 5 at 14:57

As example use #reduce:

h1 = { "a" => 10, "b" => 20, "c"=>34, "d"=>3}
h2 = { "a" => 11, "b" => 21, "d"=>15}
h2.reduce(h1.dup) {|h,(k,v)| h[k] = (h[k] && [h[k], v] || v); h}
# => {"a"=>[10, 11], "b"=>[20, 21], "c"=>34, "d"=>[3, 15]}
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h1 = { "a" => 10, "b" => 20, "c"=>34, "d"=>3}
 h2 = { "a" => 11, "b" => 21, "d"=>15}
 arr= []
 arr << h1 << h2
 data=  arr.map(&:to_a).flatten(1).reduce({}) {|h,(k,v)| (h[k] ||= []) << v; h}

and it gives

{"a"=>[10, 11], "b"=>[20, 21], "c"=>[34], "d"=>[3, 15]}
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It's not entirely clear what you're looking for, because your example output is invalid, but here's what I'd do to merge the two hashes without stomping on the keys:

h1 = { "a" => 10, "b" => 20, "c"=>34, "d"=>3}   
h2 = {  "a" => 11, "b" => 21, "d"=>15}  

new_hash = Hash.new{ |h, k| h[k] = [] }
[*h1, *h2].each { |k, v| new_hash[k] << v }

Which results in:

new_hash # => {"a"=>[10, 11], "b"=>[20, 21], "c"=>[34], "d"=>[3, 15]}
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