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I'm not clear on the differences between the "current" version of Ruby (1.8) and the "new" version (1.9). Is there an "easy" or a "simple" explanation of the differences and why it is so different?

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1  
I assume you mean Ruby 1.8.6 - Ruby 1.8.7 has a lot of library constructs from 1.9. –  Andrew Grimm May 3 '10 at 7:44
    
Any more I consider the 1.8 versions the "old" versions, and 1.9.2+ the "current" ones. I only use 1.8.7 for compatibility checks but develop in 1.9.2. –  the Tin Man Nov 9 '10 at 16:25
5  
@Telemachus: The link's broken. –  Andrew Grimm Sep 7 '11 at 2:46
1  
@Telemachus, Andrew Grimm -- this archive.org link works -- web.archive.org/web/20090423003136/http://eigenclass.org/… –  J.Merrill Feb 9 '13 at 3:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 149 down vote accepted

Sam Ruby has a cool slideshow that outline the differences.

In the interest of bringing this information inline for easier reference, and in case the link goes dead in the abstract future, here's an overview of Sam's slides. The slideshow is less overwhelming to review, but having it all laid out in a list like this is also helpful.

Ruby 1.9 - Major Features

  • Performance
  • Threads/Fibers
  • Encoding/Unicode
  • gems is (mostly) built-in now
  • if statements do not introduce scope in Ruby.

What's changed?

Single character strings.

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):001:0> ?c
=> "c"

Ruby 1.8.6

irb(main):001:0> ?c
=> 99

String index.

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):001:0> "cat"[1]
=> "a"

Ruby 1.8.6

irb(main):001:0> "cat"[1]
=> 97

{"a","b"} No Longer Supported

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):002:0> {1,2}
SyntaxError: (irb):2: syntax error, unexpected ',', expecting tASSOC

Ruby 1.8.6

irb(main):001:0> {1,2}
=> {1=>2}

Action: Convert to {1 => 2}


Array.to_s Now Contains Punctuation

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):001:0> [1,2,3].to_s
=> "[1, 2, 3]"

Ruby 1.8.6

irb(main):001:0> [1,2,3].to_s
=> "123"

Action: Use .join instead


Colon No Longer Valid In When Statements

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):001:0> case 'a'; when /\w/: puts 'word'; end
SyntaxError: (irb):1: syntax error, unexpected ':',
expecting keyword_then or ',' or ';' or '\n'

Ruby 1.8.6

irb(main):001:0> case 'a'; when /\w/: puts 'word'; end
word

Action: Use semicolon, then, or newline


Block Variables Now Shadow Local Variables

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):001:0> i=0; [1,2,3].each {|i|}; i
=> 0
irb(main):002:0> i=0; for i in [1,2,3]; end; i
=> 3

Ruby 1.8.6

irb(main):001:0> i=0; [1,2,3].each {|i|}; i
=> 3

Hash.index Deprecated

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):001:0> {1=>2}.index(2)
(irb):18: warning: Hash#index is deprecated; use Hash#key
=> 1
irb(main):002:0> {1=>2}.key(2)
=> 1

Ruby 1.8.6

irb(main):001:0> {1=>2}.index(2)
=> 1

Action: Use Hash.key


Fixnum.to_sym Now Gone

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):001:0> 5.to_sym
NoMethodError: undefined method 'to_sym' for 5:Fixnum

Ruby 1.8.6

irb(main):001:0> 5.to_sym
=> nil

(Cont'd) Ruby 1.9

# Find an argument value by name or index.
def [](index)
  lookup(index.to_sym)
end

svn.ruby-lang.org/repos/ruby/trunk/lib/rake.rb


Hash Keys Now Unordered

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):001:0> {:a=>"a", :c=>"c", :b=>"b"}
=> {:a=>"a", :c=>"c", :b=>"b"}

Ruby 1.8.6

irb(main):001:0> {:a=>"a", :c=>"c", :b=>"b"}
=> {:a=>"a", :b=>"b", :c=>"c"}

Order is insertion order


Stricter Unicode Regular Expressions

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):001:0> /\x80/u
SyntaxError: (irb):2: invalid multibyte escape: /\x80/

Ruby 1.8.6

irb(main):001:0> /\x80/u
=> /\x80/u

tr and Regexp Now Understand Unicode

Ruby 1.9

unicode(string).tr(CP1252_DIFFERENCES, UNICODE_EQUIVALENT).
  gsub(INVALID_XML_CHAR, REPLACEMENT_CHAR).
  gsub(XML_PREDEFINED) {|c| PREDEFINED[c.ord]}

pack and unpack

Ruby 1.8.6

def xchr(escape=true)
  n = XChar::CP1252[self] || self
  case n when *XChar::VALID
    XChar::PREDEFINED[n] or 
      (n>128 ? n.chr : (escape ? "&##{n};" : [n].pack('U*')))
  else
    Builder::XChar::REPLACEMENT_CHAR
  end
end
unpack('U*').map {|n| n.xchr(escape)}.join

BasicObject More Brutal Than BlankSlate

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):001:0> class C < BasicObject; def f; Math::PI; end; end; C.new.f
NameError: uninitialized constant C::Math

Ruby 1.8.6

irb(main):001:0> require 'blankslate'
=> true
irb(main):002:0> class C < BlankSlate; def f; Math::PI; end; end; C.new.f
=> 3.14159265358979

Action: Use ::Math::PI


Delegation Changes

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):002:0> class C < SimpleDelegator; end
=> nil
irb(main):003:0> C.new('').class
=> String

Ruby 1.8.6

irb(main):002:0> class C < SimpleDelegator; end
=> nil
irb(main):003:0> C.new('').class
=> C
irb(main):004:0>

Defect 17700


Use of $KCODE Produces Warnings

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):004:1> $KCODE = 'UTF8'
(irb):4: warning: variable $KCODE is no longer effective; ignored
=> "UTF8"

Ruby 1.8.6

irb(main):001:0> $KCODE = 'UTF8'
=> "UTF8"

instance_methods Now an Array of Symbols

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):001:0> {}.methods.sort.last
=> :zip

Ruby 1.8.6

irb(main):001:0> {}.methods.sort.last
=> "zip"

Action: Replace instance_methods.include? with method_defined?


Source File Encoding

Basic

# coding: utf-8

Emacs

# -*- encoding: utf-8 -*-

Shebang

#!/usr/local/rubybook/bin/ruby
# encoding: utf-8

Real Threading

  • Race Conditions
  • Implicit Ordering Assumptions
  • Test Code

What's New?

Alternate Syntax for Symbol as Hash Keys

Ruby 1.9

{a: b}

redirect_to action: show

Ruby 1.8.6

{:a => b}

redirect_to :action => show

Block Local Variables

Ruby 1.9

[1,2].each {|value; t| t=value*value}

Inject Methods

Ruby 1.9

[1,2].inject(:+)

Ruby 1.8.6

[1,2].inject {|a,b| a+b}

to_enum

Ruby 1.9

short_enum = [1, 2, 3].to_enum
long_enum = ('a'..'z').to_enum
loop do
  puts "#{short_enum.next} #{long_enum.next}"
end

No block? Enum!

Ruby 1.9

e = [1,2,3].each

Lambda Shorthand

Ruby 1.9

p = -> a,b,c {a+b+c}
puts p.(1,2,3)
puts p[1,2,3]

Ruby 1.8.6

p = lambda {|a,b,c| a+b+c}
puts p.call(1,2,3)

Complex Numbers

Ruby 1.9

Complex(3,4) == 3 + 4.im

Decimal Is Still Not The Default

Ruby 1.9

irb(main):001:0> 1.2-1.1
=> 0.0999999999999999

Regex “Properties”

Ruby 1.9

/\p{Space}/

Ruby 1.8.6

/[:space:]/

Splat in Middle

Ruby 1.9

def foo(first, *middle, last)

(->a, *b, c {p a-c}).(*5.downto(1))

Fibers

Ruby 1.9

f = Fiber.new do
  a,b = 0,1
  Fiber.yield a
  Fiber.yield b
  loop do
    a,b = b,a+b
    Fiber.yield b
  end
end
10.times {puts f.resume}

Break Values

Ruby 1.9

match =
   while line = gets
     next if line =~ /^#/
     break line if line.find('ruby')
   end

“Nested” Methods

Ruby 1.9

def toggle
  def toggle
    "subsequent times"
  end
  "first time"
end

HTH!

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2  
HTH == "Hope that helps". I had to look that up. Can you point me to an answer you provided, where you didn't hope that it would help? –  Chris Wesseling Apr 2 '13 at 14:08
    
Or did you mean Happy to help? Please edit accordingly. Or remove it, if your happiness/hopefulness counts for all your answers. ;-) –  Chris Wesseling Apr 2 '13 at 14:09
6  
No, I'm going to leave it as-is. As a percentage of the total answer, it's minuscule and either interpretation is fine with me. Thanks. –  Tim Sullivan Apr 2 '13 at 15:15
    
According to the link you provided, the change in delegation was a bug and has been fixed. –  Kyle Strand Aug 2 '13 at 18:46
    
Thanks, I've updated the answer. –  Tim Sullivan Aug 4 '13 at 22:00

One huge difference would be the move from Matz's interpreter to YARV, a bytecode virtual machine that helps significantly with performance.

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Many now recommend The Ruby Programming Language over the Pickaxe - more to the point, it has all the details of the 1.8/1.9 differences.

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1  
I like them both. The Pickaxe book discusses some things more fully but The Ruby Programming Language is good when you want to quickly scan for something. It's closer to a "nutshell" book. –  the Tin Man Nov 9 '10 at 16:26

Some more changes:

Returning a splat singleton array:

def function
  return *[1]
end

a=function
  • ruby 1.9 : [1]
  • ruby 1.8 : 1

array arguments

def function(array)
  array.each { |v| p v }
end
function "1"
  • ruby 1.8: "1"
  • ruby 1.9: undefined method `each' for "1":String
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