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I am having an byte array in my c program

unsigned char global_buffer[5]={0x0A,0x21,0x01,0x01,0x01};

When I try to print this array in hyper terminal it displays in ASCII format so its printing in unknown character format.How can i print it as

A,21,1,1,1

so that the array must be something like this {'A','21','1','1','1'} .

How can i accomplish this using bit shifting?since am working on microcontroller can use %X etc

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1  
Please note that is no such thing as a "hexadecimal array" of type unsigned char in C. It's all just numbers, they don't "become" hex until someone chooses to format them as such when converting to string for display purposes. – unwind Feb 5 '14 at 11:17
    
If all are store as 0x0A then how can you distinguish between character A and hexadecimal A to print? – Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Feb 5 '14 at 11:47

you have to use "%X" in the printf():

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

unsigned char global_buffer[5]={0x0A,0x21,0x01,0x01,0x01};

main()
{
   int i;
   for(i=0;i<5;i++) {
       printf("%X, ", global_buffer[i]);
   }
   printf("\n");
}
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1  
Am trying this in a microcontroller it passes the value to USART Transmit i cant format it using %X. So How can convert it to ascii form? The array must be something like this {'A','21','1','1','1'} – ganeshredcobra Feb 5 '14 at 11:24
    
'21' is not a byte/char – Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Feb 5 '14 at 11:46
    
@Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Note: 'A' and '21' are both int literals. 'A'` certainly will fit in a char, while the legal, but unusual, '21' will not. +1 Your "%X" is the right way to go (except needs ','). – chux Feb 5 '14 at 15:30
    
@chux Yes, I know. I mean the "char" in "character" since I have also said "byte" – Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Feb 5 '14 at 23:57

Use the %x and %X for printing hexadecimal values. consider the example

int hex = 0X0A;
printf("%x\n",hex);  o/p a //for small letters
printf("%X" , hex); o/p A // for capital letters
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