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According to the docs, I believe the example below with Ruby 1.9.2 should work in the same way as Ruby 1.9.3, but it doesn't. Given a file test with the contents hello:

Ruby 1.9.3p484:

File.read "test", 4, :mode => 'rb'
# => "HELL" 

Ruby 1.9.2p320

File.read "test", 4, :mode => 'rb'
# => TypeError: can't convert Hash into Integer

It seems like Ruby 1.9.2 and 1.9.3 differ in their way of handling optional args to File.read. Why? I cannot figure out where it's stated that this change was made.

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FWIW, I cannot reproduce this (Ruby 1.9.3p286, i386-cygwin / Ruby 1.9.3p125, i386-mingw32) – Frank Schmitt Feb 5 '14 at 12:14
    
@FrankSchmitt it have to be reproduced on 1.9.2, I believe – Малъ Скрылевъ Feb 5 '14 at 12:38
    
@МалъСкрылевъ You're right, of course. Apparently, I was somewhat confused :-) – Frank Schmitt Feb 5 '14 at 13:09
    
I don't have 1.9.2 installed anywhere to confirm, but I suspect you'll see the problem go away if you use parenthesis around your parameters. While parenthesis are optional, they're very important, especially when dealing with multiple params, and even more so with blocks. I recommend always using them to remove any ambiguity, but YMMV. – the Tin Man Feb 5 '14 at 13:29
    
@theTinMan It's not a syntax or ambiguity issue. I can reproduce this too when removing any ambiguity with parenthesis. Merely, it seems to be an issue of properly parsing the options hash from the arguments list. – Holger Just Feb 5 '14 at 13:46

It seems like Ruby 1.9.2 also expects the offset if you specify the length (in related news, I can also reproduce this on 1.9.2p320 but not on 1.9.3p484). It is not clear to me from the documentation and the C code why this would be required on 1.9.2 but it shouldn't be too big a problem here.

You can just use pass the offset as nil and it will work fine on 1.9.3 and 1.9.2.

File.read "test", 4, nil, :mode => 'rb'
share|improve this answer
    
The method signature read(name, [length [, offset]], open_args) has no default values, so, in order to pass in the open_args, the previous values have to precede them. 0 would probably be acceptable for the offset since the OP wants to read from the start of the file. – the Tin Man Feb 5 '14 at 13:59
    
Passing in nil or 0 would probably work, but I was more interested in why this is a problem in the first place, and why it apparently isn't in 1.9.3. Is it a bug in 1.9.2? – johnrl Feb 5 '14 at 14:34

Complementing Holger Just's answer.

The source code actually seems to be different.

Ruby 1.9.2

               static VALUE
rb_io_s_read(int argc, VALUE *argv, VALUE io)
{
    VALUE offset;
    struct foreach_arg arg;

    rb_scan_args(argc, argv, "13", NULL, NULL, &offset, NULL);
    open_key_args(argc, argv, &arg);
    if (NIL_P(arg.io)) return Qnil;
    if (!NIL_P(offset)) {
        struct seek_arg sarg;
        int state = 0;
        sarg.io = arg.io;
        sarg.offset = offset;
        sarg.mode = SEEK_SET;
        rb_protect(seek_before_access, (VALUE)&sarg, &state);
        if (state) {
            rb_io_close(arg.io);
            rb_jump_tag(state);
        }
        if (arg.argc == 2) arg.argc = 1;
    }
    return rb_ensure(io_s_read, (VALUE)&arg, rb_io_close, arg.io);
}

Ruby 1.9.3

               static VALUE
rb_io_s_read(int argc, VALUE *argv, VALUE io)
{
    VALUE opt, offset;
    struct foreach_arg arg;

    argc = rb_scan_args(argc, argv, "13:", NULL, NULL, &offset, NULL, &opt);
    open_key_args(argc, argv, opt, &arg);
    if (NIL_P(arg.io)) return Qnil;
    if (!NIL_P(offset)) {
        struct seek_arg sarg;
        int state = 0;
        sarg.io = arg.io;
        sarg.offset = offset;
        sarg.mode = SEEK_SET;
        rb_protect(seek_before_access, (VALUE)&sarg, &state);
        if (state) {
            rb_io_close(arg.io);
            rb_jump_tag(state);
        }
        if (arg.argc == 2) arg.argc = 1;
    }
    return rb_ensure(io_s_read, (VALUE)&arg, rb_io_close, arg.io);
}

And the diff is:

diff

So they are actually different.

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