Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to figure out why that query so slow (take about 6 second to get result)

SELECT DISTINCT
    c.id
FROM
    z1
        INNER JOIN
    c ON (z1.id = c.id)
        INNER JOIN
    i ON (c.member_id = i.member_id)
WHERE
    c.id NOT IN (... big list of ids which should be excluded)

This is execution plan

+----+-------------+-------+--------+-------------------+---------+---------+--------------------+--------+----------+--------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type   | possible_keys     | key     | key_len | ref                | rows   | filtered | Extra                    |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+-------------------+---------+---------+--------------------+--------+----------+--------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | z1    | index  | PRIMARY           | PRIMARY | 4       | NULL               | 318563 |    99.85 | Using where; Using index; Using temporary |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | c     | eq_ref | PRIMARY,member_id | PRIMARY | 4       | z1.id              |      1 |   100.00 |                          |
|  1 | SIMPLE      | i     | eq_ref | PRIMARY           | PRIMARY | 4       | c.member_id        |      1 |   100.00 | Using index              |
+----+-------------+-------+--------+-------------------+---------+---------+--------------------+--------+----------+--------------------------+

is it because mysql has to take out almost whole 1st table ? Can it be adjusted ?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

You can try to replace c with a subquery.

SELECT DISTINCT
    c.id
FROM
    z1
        INNER JOIN
    (select c.id 
     from c 
     WHERE
       c.id NOT IN (... big list of ids which should be excluded)) c ON (z1.id = c.id)
        INNER JOIN
    i ON (c.member_id = i.member_id)

to leave only necessary id's

share|improve this answer

It is imposible to say from the information you've provided whether there is a faster solution to obtaining the same data (we would need to know abou data distributions and what foreign keys are obligatory). However assuming that this is a hierarchical data set, then the plan is probably not optimal: the only predicate to reduce the number of rows is c.id NOT IN.....

The first question to ask yourself when optimizing any query is Do I need all the rows? How many rows is this returning?

I'm struggling to see any utlity in a query which returns a list of 'id' values (implying a set of autoincrement integers).

You can't use an index for a NOT IN (or <>) hence the most eficient solution is probably to start with a full table scan on 'c' - which should be the outcome of StanislavL's query.

Since you don't use the values from i and z, the joins could be replaced with 'exists' which may help performance.

share|improve this answer

I would consider creating a compound index for c(id, member_id). This way the query should work at index level only without scanning any rows in tables.

share|improve this answer
    
No it won't make a lot of difference unless there are lots of other large column types in the table - indexes don't work for NOT IN - but a covering index is faster to resolve than a very wide table. –  symcbean Feb 5 '14 at 12:49
    
@symcbean Yes, you are absolutely right, but we don't know much about table structures and data. It is just my suggestion for consideration because depending on particular situation it may work noticeably better or not. Anyway, having wider index diversity means there are more options for query optimizer to create a better execution plan. –  Karolis Feb 5 '14 at 14:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.