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For example if I have the following code:

SomeType obj;  

void GUIThread()  
{  
    ...  
    while (true)  
        // Read and print the content of obj  
    ...  
}  

void workerThread()  
{  
    ...  
    // Do some calculation and write the result into obj  
    ...  
}  

For performance reasons, I can't afford to use mutex or anything alike on obj, and I don't need exact accuracy of what GUIThread prints (obj stores the running computation results of workerThread, which can be considered as a "running total". What GUIThread needs to do is just to show the approximate progress of the calculation being done in workerThread). What I want to make sure is that the read-write race condition between GUIThread and workerThread doesn't alter the data stored in obj, and won't cause the program to crash. Is that true?

P.S. SomeType contains built-in integer types and a std::bitset<T>, but only the former will be accessed simultaneously. The bitset remains untouched by GUIThread.

P.P.S. Maybe this is a little bit out of the topic...but I think I can store the running results in a cache in workerThread, and only update the actually protected (either by atomicity or mutex locking or whatever) every relatively long time period. To achieve this, I need to make sure that if the following code will work as intended:

struct SomeOtherType  
{  
    int a, b, c, d;  // And other primitive types  
}  

std::atomic<SomeOtherType> data;  // Will this work?  

I wonder if this can protect SomeOtherType, and I think it can since there are only primitive types in SomeOtherType.

share|improve this question
    
It depends what SomeType is. What is that? –  John Zwinck Feb 5 at 12:41
    
From what it seems, you definitely have to use read write locks. –  Arunmu Feb 5 at 12:47
1  
Something to be exchanged as a simple progress counter between threads might be a std::atomic<int>. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 5 at 12:47
    
@JohnZwinck It is a user-defined structure which contains built-in integer types (int, unsigned long long, etc.) and a std::bitset<T>. I've tried to store the content of a bitset<T> into file in binary format with fout.write((const char *)(&bits), sizeof (bits)); and read it back later into another bitset<T> with fin.read((char *)(&bits2), sizeof (bits2)); and it works well, and the size of the bitset<T> varies with T, so I guess all data are stored inside the bitset without anything on heap or what. –  Zizheng Tai Feb 5 at 12:48
    
@ArunMu But I just can't afford to do so...as long as it doesn't crash the program or alter the data. –  Zizheng Tai Feb 5 at 12:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As far as I understand, you structure looks like this

struct Data {
    int one;
    int two;
    std::bitset<SomeType> three;
}

If you don't want to use any kind of lock for it, you can try to swap a shared pointer to this structure. Check if your compiler supports it, it's a new feature.

std::shared_ptr<Data> dataPointer;

void GUIThread()  
{  
    ...  
    while (true)  {
       auto ptr = std::atomic_load(&dataPointer);
       // Read and print the content of *ptr
    ...  
}  

void workerThread()  
{  
    ...  
   // Do some calculation
   auto newPtr = std::make_shared<Data>();
   // make the new result visible to the gui thread
   std::atomic_store(&dataPointer, newPtr);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you but this still has some kind of overhead. –  Zizheng Tai Feb 5 at 13:41
1  
Well, you can do it event cheaper by using a raw atomic pointer instead of shared_ptr, but then you will have to manage the memory manually somehow. –  Pavel Davydov Feb 5 at 13:46
    
@PavelDavydov: How is this making sure that GUI thread wont be reading any partially updated data to the memory ? –  Arunmu Feb 5 at 13:49
1  
@ArunMu cause it reads from the storage that is once build and never modified after that. The only shared resource here is dataPointer, but it is protected with atomic functions. –  Pavel Davydov Feb 5 at 13:52
    
@PavelDavydov hmm..this might just work. Thanks –  Arunmu Feb 5 at 14:02

What you are saying is "I am writing code with undefined behavior. Will it do what I want anyway?". The only answer is nobody knows except possible of the compiler writer.

It seems likely your code will do what you want because it seems the simplest way to implement the compiler. But it might well decide that nothing outside of your loop can be writing to that variable because if it did it would be a data race and therefore the standard says nothing about what it will do and then decide to replace the variable by a constant in that part of the program as it can't change and re-use that memory to store the value of another pointer in so your other thread will set a completely unconnected value to null and crash your program an hour later. It's unlikely of course but I can see how it could happen.

Undefined behavior is just that - undefined. It literally could do anything. Some things are clearly more likely than others but do you really want to risk formatting your user's disk because you thought "undefined" didn't apply to your program, no matter how small the risk appeared to be?

share|improve this answer
    
I have seen that very thing happen. A loop that didn't update the variable but just read it, and the compiler simply hoisted all loads out of the loop, so that it never saw any concurrent updates. –  Sebastian Redl Feb 5 at 13:45
1  
+1, Also if some code works (though it has UB) on x86_64, it doesn't make it stable and doesn't mean that it would not crash on an architecture with a weaker memory model (like arm). –  Pavel Davydov Feb 5 at 13:58
    
+1 For pointing out that the question is essentially broken. If you need synchronization, you have to pay for it. If for whatever reason this seems too expensive, redesign your program so that it becomes cheaper. Relying on UB and hoping that it will somehow work in the end is always the worst option. –  ComicSansMS Feb 5 at 15:00

Depending heavily on the shared data type. What can happen in a complex data type is that during a write operation, the object becomes invalid briefly (e.g. allocates a new internal buffer).

For simple data types, such as integers, floats, etc. the code will not crash on most cases but w/o guaranties!. These should be declared as volatile to avoid the compiler caching them in a register. Forcing a memory barrier will improve your result accuracy.

If you're just checking a Boolean flag or something similar, you can get away with.

If obj is thread safe, then you're OK too.

My suggestion, when in doubt, use a low overhead lock such as spinlocks.

share|improve this answer
1  
volatile doesn't force a memory barrier in c++ as far as I know. –  Pavel Davydov Feb 5 at 12:58
    
' the code will not crash' Believe me, I've been seen enough code badly crashing because of this misconception of volatile! –  πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 5 at 13:00
    
Actually a memory barrier is not very necessary, because as I mentioned I don't need much accuracy for what's SHOWN. I just need the accuracy of what's actually STORED. Other than that, speed first. –  Zizheng Tai Feb 5 at 13:01
    
I've fixed my answer. Yes even an int can cause issues. Very dependent on what your code with it... –  egur Feb 5 at 13:05
    
@ZizhengTai: Yes, as egur said, spinlock can be used as you just want to copy the data and print it. Spinlock wont cause a context switch and is much more light weight than mutex. –  Arunmu Feb 5 at 13:46

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