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I have a jar containing the main class of a project. This depends on several other jars that reside in a lib directory. One class of such a dependend jar loads a ressource "/Data/foo/bar/file.txt". But loading this file as ressource leads to null.

Here is the directory structure:

./main.jar
./lib/lib1.jar
./lib/lib2.jar
./lib/lib3.jar
./lib/runtimedata/Data/foo/bar/file.txt

This is the classpath of the manifest.mf of the main.jar:

lib/lib1.jar lib/lib2.jar lib/lib3.jar lib/runtimedata

I start the application via

java -jar main.jar

The lib2.jar contains a class that tries to load the file with

ThatClass.class.getResource("/Data/foo/bar/file.txt");

But that happens to be null. Why? lib/runtimedata is in the classpath. I even tried to put the Data directory into lib/lib/runtimedata, in case the path is relative to the jar file containing the loading class. But that doesn't help.

What am I doing wrong here?

EDIT:

Running the application with

java -cp main.jar:lib/*.jar:lib/runtimedata my.package.Main

works correctly.

EDIT 2:

I cannot change that lib that does the resource loading. I am only using that lib. The only things I can change is the main.jar the classpath and the command line.

share|improve this question
    
I always use X.class.getClassLoader().getResource("file.txt"). Maybe that helps. Try ThatClass.class.getClassLoader().getResource("/Data/foo/bar/file.txt"); – marioosh Feb 5 '14 at 13:03
    
@marioosh No, it doesn't. I am sorry. But I cannot change the used libs. I have to use them as they are. I am only able to set the classpath and the way the application is started. – radlan Feb 5 '14 at 13:06

When you start the path with a "/", it's considered as absolute. Try ThatClass.class.getResource("/runtime/Data/foo/bar/file.txt");

Otherwise, if you cant't change the code, put the file on /Data/foo/bar/file.txt

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't think so. A path starting with "/" is absolute. That is correct. But it should be absolute to the classpath. Not absolute to the filesystem. Since I have added the "lib/runtimedata" to the class path, this should provide the correct root. For example, I didn't put "/" or "." to the classpath. So putting the Data directory into the root of the filesystem or the directory of the main.jar shouldn't help. – radlan Feb 5 '14 at 13:11

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