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Please read the question here - http://www.spoj.com/problems/MRECAMAN/

The question was to compute the recaman's sequence where, a(0) = 0 and, a(i) = a(i-1)-i if, a(i-1)-i > 0 and does not come into the sequence before else, a(i) = a(i-1) + i.

Now when I use vectors to store the sequence, and use the find function, the program times out. But when I use an array and a set to see if the element exists, it gets accepted (very fast). IS using set faster?

Here are the codes:

Vector implementation

vector <int> sequence;
sequence.push_back(0);
for (int i = 1; i <= 500000; i++)
{
    a = sequence[i - 1] - i;
    b = sequence[i - 1] + i;
    if (a > 0 && find(sequence.begin(), sequence.end(), a) == sequence.end())
        sequence.push_back(a);
    else
        sequence.push_back(b);
}

Set Implementation

int a[500001]
set <int> exists;
a[0] = 0;
for (int i = 1; i <= MAXN; ++i)
{
    if (a[i - 1] - i > 0 && exists.find(a[i - 1] - i) == exists.end()) a[i] = a[i - 1] - i;
    else a[i] = a[i - 1] + i;
    exists.insert(a[i]);
}
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1  
Did you try it? –  πάντα ῥεῖ Feb 5 at 13:28
2  
Please format your code appropriately. –  bblincoe Feb 5 at 13:28
    
I tried formatting, it doesnt work. I am new here. @bblincoe –  achiever202 Feb 5 at 13:29
    
Yes! I tried it, submitted both the codes, one gives TLE and the other AC. @πάνταῥεῖ –  achiever202 Feb 5 at 13:30
    
My guess is that there is an error in your Vector Implementation code –  CocoNess Feb 5 at 13:31

6 Answers 6

Lookup in an std::vector:

find(sequence.begin(), sequence.end(), a)==sequence.end()

is an O(n) operation (n being the number of elements in the vector).

Lookup in an std::set (which is a balanced binary search tree):

exists.find(a[i-1] - i) == exists.end()

is an O(log n) operation.

So yes, lookup in a set is (asymptotically) faster than a linear lookup in vector.

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Thank you, didnt know this :) –  achiever202 Feb 5 at 13:37
1  
It doesn't necessarily mean it is "faster". Complexity is about how it scales with size. –  juanchopanza Feb 5 at 13:44
    
@juanchopanza, if you define faster as has asymptotically smaller execution time, then smaller complexity also means faster. I am aware that out of context, this statement is imprecise (wrong even). However, given that the OP states the code with vector timed out, while with set it was quite fast, I can assume that the given n is considerably large and the asymptotic behavior is observed. –  Shahbaz Feb 5 at 13:59
    
Sure, and your answer is clearer now. But given OP claims vector is slower than an array, I suspect they are doing something wrong. –  juanchopanza Feb 5 at 14:00
    
@juanchopanza, the OP states that the vector is slower than an array and a set. I updated the answer though anyway (as you have already seen). –  Shahbaz Feb 5 at 14:02

If you can sort the vector, the look up is faster in most cases than in set because it is much more cache friendly.

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I cant sort the vector, because at any query i have to look up for the ith element in the sequence. –  achiever202 Feb 5 at 13:48
1  
@achiever202 I provided an example in my answer which uses a sorted vector, because you can set aside the last inserted element (which is the only one you have to look up) –  Arne Mertz Feb 5 at 14:33

There is only one valid answer to most "Is XY faster than UV in C++" questions:

Use a profiler.

While most algorithms (including container insertions, searches etc.) have a guaranteed complexity, these complexities can only tell you about the approximate behavior for large amounts of data. The performance for any given smaller set of data can not be easily compared, and the optimizations that a compiler can apply can not be reasonably guessed by humans. So use a profiler and see what is faster. If it matters at all. To see if performance matters in that special part of your program, use a profiler.

However, in your case it might be a safe bet that searching a set of ~250k elements can be faster than searching an unsorted vector of tat size. However, if you use the vector only for storing the inserted values and leave the sequence[i-1] out in a separate variable, you can keep the vector sorted and use an algorithm for sorted ranges like binary_search, which can be way faster than the set.

A sample implementation with a sorted vector:

const static size_t NMAX = 500000;
vector<int> values = {0};
values.reserve(NMAX );
int lastInserted = 0;

for (int i = 1; i <= NMAX) {
  auto a = lastInserted - i;
  auto b = lastInserted + i;

  auto iter = lower_bound(begin(values), end(values), a);
  //a is always less than the last inserted value, so iter can't be end(values)

  if (a > 0 && a < *iter) {
    lastInserted = a;
  }
  else {
    //b > a => lower_bound(b) >= lower_bound(a)
    iter = lower_bound(iter, end(values), b);
    lastInserted = b;
  }
  values.insert(iter, lastInserted);
}

I hope I did not introduce any bugs...

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I dunno, inserting into a sorted vector is O(N); inserting into a set is O(log N). Of course I'd have to actually write and time programs to compare. –  aschepler Feb 5 at 13:42
    
No, i cant sort the vector, because at any query, i have to look up for the ith element in the sequence. –  achiever202 Feb 5 at 13:47
    
@achiever202 therefore I told you to store the last found element additionally in a separate variable. You only have to see the last variable you inserted. –  Arne Mertz Feb 5 at 13:53
1  
@aschepler yes, on very large scales the set will be faster. But the factor will differ from implementation to implementation, so it's not clear when the set's performance will actually take over. After all, to insert into a set, you have to allocate memory for the new tree node, balance the tree etc, which is different (faster? slower? at what scale?) to inserting into a vector (remember to reserve before the loop). –  Arne Mertz Feb 5 at 13:58

For the task at hand, set is faster than vector because it keeps its contents sorted and does a binary search to find a specified item, giving logarithmic complexity instead of linear complexity. When the set is small, that difference is also small, but when the set gets large the difference grows considerably. I think you can improve things a bit more than just that though.

First, I'd avoid the clumsy lookup to see if an item is already present by just attempting to insert an item, then see if that succeeded:

    if (b>0 && exists.insert(b).second)
        a[i] = b;
    else {
        a[i] = c;
        exists.insert(c);
    }

This avoids looking up the same item twice, once to see if it was already present, and again to insert the item. It only does a second lookup when the first one was already present, so we're going to insert some other value.

Second, and even more importantly, you can use std::unordered_set to improve the complexity from logarithmic to (expected) constant. Since unordered_set uses (mostly) the same interface as std::set, this substitution is easy to make (including the optimization above.

Here's some code to compare the three methods:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <set>
#include <unordered_set>
#include <vector>
#include <numeric>
#include <chrono>

static const int MAXN = 500000;

unsigned original() {
    static int a[MAXN+1];
    std::set <int> exists;
    a[0] = 0;
    for (int i = 1; i <= MAXN; ++i)
    {
        if (a[i - 1] - i > 0 && exists.find(a[i - 1] - i) == exists.end()) a[i] = a[i - 1] - i;
        else a[i] = a[i - 1] + i;
        exists.insert(a[i]);
    }
    return std::accumulate(std::begin(a), std::end(a), 0U);
}

template <class container>
unsigned reduced_lookup() {
    container exists;
    std::vector<int> a(MAXN + 1);

    a[0] = 0;

    for (int i = 1; i <= MAXN; ++i) {
        int b = a[i - 1] - i;
        int c = a[i - 1] + i;

        if (b>0 && exists.insert(b).second)
            a[i] = b;
        else {
            a[i] = c;
            exists.insert(c);
        }
    }
    return std::accumulate(std::begin(a), std::end(a), 0U);

}

template <class F>
void timer(F f) {
    auto start = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    std::cout << f() <<"\t";
    auto stop = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    std::cout << "Time: " << std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(stop - start).count() << " ms\n";
}

int main() {
    timer(original);
    timer(reduced_lookup<std::set<int>>);
    timer(reduced_lookup<std::unordered_set<int>>);
}

Note how std::set and std::unordered_set provide similar enough interfaces that I've written the code as a single template that can use either type of container, then for timing just instantiated that for both set and unordered_set.

Anyway, here's some results from g++ (version 4.8.1, compiled with -O3):

212972756       Time: 137 ms
212972756       Time: 101 ms
212972756       Time: 63 ms

Changing the lookup strategy improves speed by about 30%1 and using unordered_set with the improved lookup strategy better than doubles the speed compared to the original--not bad, especially when the result actually looks cleaner, at least to me. You might not agree that it's cleaner looking, but I think we can at least agree that I didn't write code that was a lot longer or more complex to get the speed improvement.


1. Simplistic analysis indicates that it should be around 25%. Specifically, if we assume there are even odds of a given number being in the set already, then this eliminates half the lookups about half the time, or about 1/4th of the lookups.

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+1 Just wanted to add that your figures show almost exactly 25% improvement due to lookup. –  TT_ Jun 6 at 20:14

The set is a huge speedup because it's faster to look up. (Btw, exists.count(a) == 0 is prettier than using find.)

That doesn't have anything to do with vector vs array though. Adding the set to the vector version should work just as fine.

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Thanks, i didnt know this :) –  achiever202 Feb 5 at 13:37
    
count is slower since it has to iterate over the whole vector in all cases. If you really want to find an element, using count is less expressive too. –  TNA Feb 5 at 13:38
1  
I'm calling count on the set, though. And I don't care where the element is, just whether it exists, for which count is expressive enough. That's what makes it better: always use the least expressive function that is sufficient for your task; it makes it more obvious what you're trying to achieve. –  Sebastian Redl Feb 5 at 13:39

It is classic space-time tradeoff. When you use only vector your program uses minimum memory but you should to find existing numbers on every step. It is slowly. When you use additional index data structure (like a set in your case) you dramatically speed up your code but your code now takes at least twice greater memory. More about tradeoff here.

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