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What do I need to consider before choosing the target android OS for app development?

This is my understanding of how to do it and any clarification would be appreciated:

  1. Determine which OS version is currently in use the most. Look at distribution graphs etc.
  2. Target that version.

that is what I read all the time, but I have some questions.

Suppose 4.0 is the version that is the most used among android phone consumers so I should target 4.0. Now, suppose that I don't use features that are unique to 4.0. will my app work with any version below 4.0 including 1.5, 2.3 etc.? Consider the reverse situation. If I target version 2.3 and if my app uses only features that are available to 2.3 will my app work on phones that are running version 4.0 even though I will not be using features that are unique to version 4.0?

thanks.

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3 Answers 3

have a look at your AndroidManifest.xml
There is a targetSdkVersion and minSdkVersion if you want to support all devices running 2.2 and up then set minSdkVersion to api level 8 (android 2.2)
but in general, its a good practice to develop against the latest api as target (currently API 19, Android 4.4), so you can ensure it will work from your chosen min up to the newest OS api

so if you want to support at least Gingerbread up to KitKat do this in your manifest:

<uses-sdk android:minSdkVersion="9"
    android:targetSdkVersion="19" />

and develop against api 19 :)

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Thanks for the information guys, but.... so I should put this in my manifest file... <uses-sdk android:minskdversion="9" android:targetsdkversion="19"> so with this configuration then I gingerbread users should be able to install and use the my app eventhough I am targeting the latest version which is KitKat. But what if I develop an app that uses features that are unique to KitKat or are only available with KitKat. Then ginerbread users will not be able to install or use the app right even though I specified that the minsdkversion is "9" right? –  Joe Dugan Feb 5 '14 at 14:38
    
no, they will be able to install it if you set minSdkVersion to 9 but if you run the critical code snippet, it will force close because of NoSuchMethodError. but you could make a if ( Build.VERSION.SDK_INT < 19) and do whatever to do if api level is smaller than 19 (KitKat) –  Malte Schmitz Feb 5 '14 at 14:48
    
I'm confused.Let's say I don't use any features that are unique to KitKat,then gingerbread users should have no problems running the app on their phones without the app force closing with a nosuchmethoderror right? then I would not have to use the if( Build.VERSION.SDK_INT<19) code right? if i do use new features unique to KitKat,then It would crash on gingerbread users when they try to use those unique features of KitKat. So the if ( Build.VERSION.SDK_INT < 19) {//code to run if version is less than 19} code block would include the methods that refer to the features unique to KitKat? thanks. –  Joe Dugan Feb 5 '14 at 15:19
    
if you use only functions that are available on gingerbread or lower, it works without any if(...SDK_INT). but if you use a kitkat unique function, you have to do if(...SDK_INT < 19) { //not kitkat code } else { //kitkat only code } so you have to find an alternative for the kitkat unique code. clear now? –  Malte Schmitz Feb 5 '14 at 15:32
    
yes thats right, or at least it should do something that your app is able to work.without that code (e.g. inform.the user about that error, write the code yourself, ...) –  Malte Schmitz Feb 5 '14 at 16:08

Suppose 4.0 is the version that is the most used among android phone consumers so I should target 4.0. Now, suppose that I don't use features that are new to 4.0. will my app work with any version below 4.0 including 1.5, 2.3 etc.?

Only if you don't use APIs that were introduced after the earliest version you want the app to run on.

If I target version 2.3 and if my app uses only features that are available to 2.3 will my app work on phones that are running version 4.0 even though I will not be using features that are unique to version 4.0?

Yes. Some functions get deprecated in newer OS versions, but most of them still work in newer releases for keeping compatibility.

I feel the thing to stress here is that Android is backwards compatible, so newer versions will almost be able to run apps developed for older OS versions.

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The target version is the highest version you have tested it on. You should always target the absolute latest if you can. The min version is the lowest version that will be able to install the app.

So in the manifest, you would typically have something like this:

<uses-sdk android:minSdkVersion="9" android:targetSdkVersion="19" ...

Pick the minSdkVersion based on the features that are absolutely required for your app to function.

So you might wonder what the purpose of targetSdkVersion is. One reason is if your app has some optional features that are in later versions of the SDK. targetSdkVersion will allow you to use those later features, but you will need to protect those method calls with a check against the device's SDK with a call like

if (Build.VERSION.SDK_INT >= 11)
    myMethodThatUsesFeaturesOnlyInHoneycombAndLater();

Another reason is that sometimes the Android team makes changes to some of the defaults in various settings on your classes, but to maintain compatibility for future versions on which you have not tested your app, they keep the old default if your app doesn't claim to target this later version.

For example, after Honeycomb, the menu is supposed to be integrated with the action bar. But old apps that were compiled with earlier SDKs have not been tested with Honeycomb or later, as proved by them having a targetSdkVersion of less than 11, so the OS knows to display the old style menu. Once this developer decides to test their app on a more recent targetSdkVersion, they update the value and the OS can trust that they have tested it on Honeycomb, so it can safely show the new style menu.

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