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Is it possible to create an event listener in jQuery that can be bound to any style changes? For example, if I want to "do" something when an element changes dimensions, or any other changes in the style attribute I could do:

$('div').bind('style', function() {
    console.log($(this).css('height'));
});

$('div').height(100); // yields '100'

It would be really useful.

Any ideas?

UPDATE

Sorry for answering this myself, but I wrote a neat solution that might fit someone else:

(function() {
    var ev = new $.Event('style'),
        orig = $.fn.css;
    $.fn.css = function() {
        orig.apply(this, arguments);
        $(this).trigger(ev);
    }
})();

This will temporary override the internal prototype.css method and the redefine it with a trigger at the end. So it works like this:

$('p').bind('style', function(e) {
    console.log( $(this).attr('style') );
});

$('p').width(100);
$('p').css('color','red');
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Nice solution, thanks for including it! That's exactly what I was thinking :) –  Josh Stodola Jan 28 '10 at 22:14
    
yup, nice solution, but in a real application, i suspect this might take a lot of resources, and even make the browser seem slow to keep up with the user's interactions. I'd love to know if that is the case or not. –  pixeline Jan 28 '10 at 23:07
1  
@pixeline: I can't see that it should be that much slower. jQuery still calls the css prototype anyway, I'm just adding a trigger to it. So it's basically just one extra method call. –  David Jan 29 '10 at 9:18
    
I understand that: it just seems that in the flow of a user interacting with an application, css() is called a lot of time. Depending on what you do with that trigger (if it's just a console log, i guess you are safe of course), this might create issues. I'm just wondering. It depends on the application too. I personally tend to do a lot of visual feedback in my stuff. –  pixeline Jan 29 '10 at 10:07
3  
Maybe this plugin I wrote will help: techfoobar.com/jquery-style-listener –  techfoobar Jan 6 '13 at 16:58
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9 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since jQuery is open-source, I would guess that you could tweak the css function to call a function of your choice every time it is invoked (passing the jQuery object). Of course, you'll want to scour the jQuery code to make sure there is nothing else it uses internally to set CSS properties. Ideally, you'd want to write a separate plugin for jQuery so that it does not interfere with the jQuery library itself, but you'll have to decide whether or not that is feasible for your project.

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1  
But in this case what would happen if I set the style property straightly with DOM functions?? –  Jaime Hablutzel Dec 16 '11 at 15:40
    
@jaime in layman's terms: nothing. –  m93a Sep 23 '13 at 16:45
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The declaration of your event object has to be inside your new css function. Otherwise the event can only be fire once.

(function() {
    orig = $.fn.css;
    $.fn.css = function() {
        var ev = new $.Event('style');
        orig.apply(this, arguments);
        $(this).trigger(ev);
    }
})();
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Great, thank you. Some people tell change the original source but your extension is the best. I had some problems but finally it works. –  ccsakuweb Jul 3 '12 at 8:23
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As others have suggested, if you have control over whatever code is changing the style of the element you could fire a custom event when you change the element's height:

$('#blah').bind('height-changed',function(){...});
...
$('#blah').css({height:'100px'});
$('#blah').trigger('height-changed');

Otherwise, although pretty resource-intensive, you could set a timer to periodically check for changes to the element's height...

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Interesting question. The problem is that height() does not accept a callback, so you wouldn't be able to fire up a callback. Use either animate() or css() to set the height and then trigger the custom event in the callback. Here is an example using animate() , tested and works (demo), as a proof of concept :

$('#test').bind('style', function() {
    alert($(this).css('height'));
});

$('#test').animate({height: 100},function(){
$(this).trigger('style');
}); 
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5  
Sorry, but what did this prove? You trigger() the event manually. I would think the OP is after some auto-triggered event when a style attribute is modified. –  JPot Jan 28 '10 at 21:21
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I think the best answer if from Mike in the case you can't launch your event because is not from your code. But I get some errors when I used it. So I write a new answer for show you the code that I use.

(function() {
    orig = $.fn.css;
    $.fn.css = function() {
        var result = orig.apply(this, arguments);
        $(this).trigger("stylechanged");
        return result;
    }
})();

I got error because var ev = new $.Event('style'); Something like style was not defined in HtmlDiv.. I removed it, and I launch now $(this).trigger("stylechanged"). Another problem was that Mike didn't return the resulto of $(css, ..) then It can make problems in some cases. So I get the result and return it. Now works ^^ In every css change include from some libs that I can't modify and trigger an event.

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Just adding and formalizing @David 's solution from above:

Note that jQuery functions are chainable and return 'this' so that multiple invocations can be called one after the other (e.g $container.css("overflow", "hidden").css("outline", 0);).

So the improved code should be:

(function() {
    var ev = new $.Event('style'),
        orig = $.fn.css;
    $.fn.css = function() {
        var ret = orig.apply(this, arguments);
        $(this).trigger(ev);
        return ret; // must include this
    }
})();
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There is no inbuilt support for the style change event in jQuery or in java script. But jQuery supports to create custom event and listen to it but every time there is a change, you should have a way to trigger it on yourself. So it will not be a complete solution.

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I had the same problem, so I wrote this. It works rather well. Looks great if you mix it with some CSS transitions.

function toggle_visibility(id) {
   var e = document.getElementById("mjwelcome");
   if(e.style.height == '')
      e.style.height = '0px';
   else
      e.style.height = '';
}
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Things have moved on a bit since the question was asked - it is now possible to use a MutationObserver to detect changes in the 'style' attribute of an element, no jQuery required.

var observer = new MutationObserver(function(mutations) {
    mutations.forEach(function(mutation) {
        console.log('style changed!');
    });    
});

var target = document.getElementById('myId');
observer.observe(target, { attributes : true, attributeFilter : ['style'] });

Support is good in modern browsers but if you need to support IE you might have to wait a year or two.

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