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I'm trying to replace (with sed) a group matched with a regex, but the best I can get out of my tests is a string that replaces the entire string on the right side of the sed separator.

Example:

echo "this is a sample id='42' string" | sed -r "s/id='(.*?)'/\11/g"

Output:

this is a sample 421 string

Desired output:

this is a sample id='1' string

Is this possible? How?

EDIT:

What I'm trying to do is to actually replace just the group matched by the regex, not the entire string on the left side of the sed script. Said with other words: I want to replace just the '42' with '1' without using "id=''".

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It is not clear what you mean. Can you improve the explanation with more examples? –  fedorqui Feb 5 at 15:05
    
@fedorqui Done, please see edit –  alexandernst Feb 5 at 15:09
    
Mmm then from my deleted answer, this should make it --> echo "this is a sample id='42' string" | sed -r "s/'[^']*'/'5'/" . That is, to just check anything in between single quotes. –  fedorqui Feb 5 at 15:10
    
@fedorqui No, you're still using '' with the 5. The '' are outside of my group (id='(.*?)'). I want to replace just the (.*?). –  alexandernst Feb 5 at 15:12
    
Then you can catch them and print back. Note that when using sed s/sth/new/g, sth will be replaced with new, so if you have it in sth you have to print back in new. Hence, you can do sed -r "s/(')[^']*(')/\15\2/", although it looks a little too much. –  fedorqui Feb 5 at 15:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Maybe like this?

$ echo "this is a sample id='42' string" | sed -r "s/id='.*?'/id='1'/g"

Result:

this is a sample id='1' string

Or you can do this:

$ echo "this is a sample id='42' string" | sed -r "s/(id=')(.*?)(')/\11\3/g"
this is a sample id='1' string

Result:

this is a sample id='1' string

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No, please see comments under my question. This is absolutely not what I'm asking for. –  alexandernst Feb 5 at 15:12
    
AFAIK sed doesn't have look(ahead|behind) capabilities, so the whole pattern will be replaced by something anyway. But if your pattern is easy as your example then copying it to the replacement part doesn't seem to be problematic. –  Lajos Veres Feb 5 at 15:15
    
I added an other option without repeating the pattern as a constant only as a group-copy. –  Lajos Veres Feb 5 at 15:17
    
There are no non-capturing brackets in sed to his is the best possible answer IMHO. –  wds Feb 5 at 15:19
    
This could work actually. I was looking for some solution that wouldn't require to copy from the left side of the string to the right side, but I just realized that sed can't do that, so indeed this is the best possible answer. Thank you –  alexandernst Feb 5 at 15:25

In sed, the entire left regex is relpaced by the entire right regex. If you would like to preserve a portion of the left regex, you must explicitly copy it to the right or make it a capturing group as well:

echo "this is a sample id='42' string" | sed -r "s/id='(.*?)'/\11/g"

will correctly replace all of the match, id='42', with 421 since \1 is 42. If you want to preserve the part that says id=..., you have to put it in the replacement:

echo "this is a sample id='42' string" | sed -r "s/id='(.*?)'/id='1'/g"
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Here is a simple way to do it in awk

echo "this is a sample id='42' string" | awk -F\' '{$2=1}1' OFS=\'
this is a sample id='1' string

It does use ' as field separator and then just replace value in field #2

This should work too:

awk -F\' '$2=1' OFS=\'
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