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If I have a class that contains, for example, a List<string> and I want other classes to be able to see the list but not set it, I can declare

public class SomeClass()
{
    public List<string> SomeList { get; }
}

This will allow another class to access SomeList and not set it.

However, although the calling class can't set the list, it can add or remove elements. How do I prevent that? I guess I could use a field and return a copy of the List instead of using a property, but that just doesn't feel right.

(This should be very simple but I must be missing something....)

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2  
duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/619396/… – Marek Karbarz Jan 28 '10 at 21:39
    
I was positive it was a dupe, just couldn't find it... – Michael Todd Jan 28 '10 at 21:42
    
I was going to close this as a dupe, but the answer given is sufficiently different from answers in the "dupe" question that I think it should stay. Up to the community, now.... – Michael Todd Jan 28 '10 at 21:58
up vote 8 down vote accepted

You won't be able to use an autoproperty.

public class SomeClass()
{
    private List<string> someList;
    public IList<string> SomeList { 
        get { return someList.AsReadOnly(); }
    }
}
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According to MSDN, this operation is O(1), so no need to worry about the performance hit. – Bryan Jan 28 '10 at 21:43
    
The only problem being that modifying the internal list will cause enumerations to fail. – John Gietzen Jan 28 '10 at 21:44
    
Yes, I noticed that IList needed to be used (but didn't have AsReadOnly() as a method). This seems to be the "best" bet so far; still feels wrong, though. – Michael Todd Jan 28 '10 at 21:45
    
@John Gietzen: This only applies if they happen to call methods on you while holding an enumerator, or you have multithreaded code. – Anon. Jan 28 '10 at 21:47
    
@Michael - what makes it feel wrong? You can implement add and delete methods if necessary. This way, you control modification to the list – Russ Cam Jan 28 '10 at 21:47

You'll want to return the list as a ReadOnly list. You can do this with the following code:

using System.Collections.ObjectModel;

public ReadOnlyCollection<string> GetList() {
    return SomeList.AsReadOnly();
}
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Return IEnumerable<string>, which is immutable. The getter should look like this:

public IEnumerable<string> SomeList
{
   get
   {
      foreach(string s in SomeList) yield return s; // excuse my inline style here, zealots
      yield break;
   }
}
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Although a bit more involved than the AsReadOnly route, I like this implementation a bit better – Mitchel Sellers Jan 28 '10 at 21:47
    
This does prevent random access on the list, though. – Anon. Jan 28 '10 at 21:52
1  
You're right, Anon, but I always figure that to require random access is to have some knowledge about the collection. Any external caller to this method could only be making assumptions about the collection it gets back, which I prefer not to allow it to do. – Jay Jan 28 '10 at 22:31
public class SomeClass()
{
    private List<string> _someList = new List<string>();

    public IList<string> SomeList 
    { 
         get { return _someList.AsReadOnly(); } 
    }
}
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