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I need to create a predicate:

applyConstraints(L)

That applies constraints to the variables in L such that no two contiguous elements in L are both odd or even how can I do that? With a fixed size L it's simple but what about a variable size L? I need that to be done using sicstus-prolog clpfd library.

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can't imagine how could be simpler than a loop... –  CapelliC Feb 5 at 19:59
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3 Answers 3

% SICStus:

applyConstraints([]).
applyConstraints([X|Xs]) :-
    X mod 2 #= R,
    applyConstraints(Xs, R).

applyConstraints([], _).
applyConstraints([X|Xs], R) :-
    X mod 2 #= S,
    S #\= R,
    applyConstraints(Xs, S).

% Query:

| ?- applyConstraints(L), length(L,2), !, domain(L,-2,2), labeling([],L).
L = [-2,-1] ? ;
L = [-2,1] ? ;
L = [-1,-2] ? ;
L = [-1,0] ? ;
L = [-1,2] ? ;
L = [0,-1] ? ;
L = [0,1] ? ;
L = [1,-2] ? ;
L = [1,0] ? ;
L = [1,2] ? ;
L = [2,-1] ? ;
L = [2,1] ? ;
no
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1  
I think there was no need to throw away your original one-liner solution. When the OP talks about variable size L they probably simply mean not fixed at compile time. You may be giving a bad example here by showing a program with a choicepoint in the constraint setup phase. –  jschimpf Feb 8 at 0:01
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Just consider pair of elements

applyConstraints([A,B|R]) :-
    A mod 2 #\= B mod 2,
    applyConstraints([B|R]).
applyConstraints([_]).

test (using SWI-Prolog library(clpfd), maybe you will need to substitute ins/2 with the counterpart from Sicstus)

?- L=[X,Y,Z], applyConstraints(L), L ins 1..4, label(L).
L = [1, 2, 1],
X = Z, Z = 1,
Y = 2 ;
L = [1, 2, 3],
X = 1,
Y = 2,
Z = 3 ;
...
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Why don't you write the clauses as is common: Facts first. Your writing induces a bunch of unnecessary overheads. –  false Feb 5 at 20:11
    
@false: because of matching in absence of indexing ? –  CapelliC Feb 5 at 20:14
    
Reasons: The absence of indexing (in current implementations), but also the inability to produce answers for the most general query - which is often very useful in the context of diagnosis. –  false Feb 5 at 20:32
    
applyConstraints([]) fails –  false Feb 5 at 21:07
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Inspired by @MatsCarlsson's version, I tried to minimize the number of constrained variables involved:

applyConstraints(Xs) :-
   S #\= R,
   applyConstraints(Xs, S, R).

applyConstraints([], _, _).
applyConstraints([X|Xs], S, R) :-
   X mod 2 #= S,
   applyConstraints(Xs, R, S).

Edit: This version has one flaw for the goal applyConstraints([]) which is not readily visible. In fact, one needs to switch to full_answer mode like so:

| ?- applyConstraints([]).
yes
| ?- assertz(clpfd:full_answer).
yes
| ?- applyConstraints([]).
clpfd:(_A#\=_B),
_A in inf..sup,
_B in inf..sup ? ;
no

So we have this useless constraint hanging around which might eat up resources. To overcome this deficiency, some special casing is needed:

applyConstraints([]).
applyConstraints([X|Xs]) :-
   X mod 2 #= S,
   S #\= R,
   applyConstraints(Xs, R, S).

Note — in SWI or YAP there is no direct way to switch full answer mode on. The only way to get hold of the problem is to wrap the query around call_residue_vars/2 like so:

?- applyConstraints([]).
true.

?- call_residue_vars(applyConstraints([]),RVs).
RVs = [_G794, _G797],
_G794#\=_G797.
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