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Trying to setup a simple RMI server with SSL encryption. It's for a simple chat application that has a java server app and a java client app, however, I can't even get it working with a simple RMI example at the moment!

The only way I can get it to work is if both the client & server have both the same truststore & keystore. To me though, this sounds incorrect as it means each client has the server's private key too..

I followed this guide to create the trust/keystores: http://www.techbrainwave.com/?p=953

I first tried generating a keystore & truststore and just running the server with the keystore & the client with the truststore but that didn't work, so then generated a pair for each and loaded as shown in the code below.

It think I might be missing something obvious somewhere just can't for the life of my figure out what I'm doing wrong.

I currently have the following, but when running the server I get the following errors: http://pastebin.com/PFSy1tfV

Hello.java

import java.rmi.Remote;
import java.rmi.RemoteException;

public interface Hello extends Remote {

    String sayHello() throws RemoteException;

}

Server.java

import java.io.IOException;
import java.rmi.RemoteException;
import java.rmi.registry.LocateRegistry;
import java.rmi.registry.Registry;
import java.rmi.server.UnicastRemoteObject;

import javax.net.ssl.SSLServerSocket;
import javax.net.ssl.SSLServerSocketFactory;
import javax.net.ssl.SSLSocket;
import javax.net.ssl.SSLSocketFactory;
import javax.rmi.ssl.SslRMIClientSocketFactory;
import javax.rmi.ssl.SslRMIServerSocketFactory;


public class Server extends UnicastRemoteObject implements Hello {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 5186776461749320975L;

    protected Server(int port) throws IOException {

        super(port, new SslRMIClientSocketFactory(), new SslRMIServerSocketFactory(null, null, true));      
    }

    @Override
    public String sayHello() {
        return "Hello, world!";
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws RemoteException, IllegalArgumentException {

        try {           

            setSettings();

            Server server = new Server(2020);

            LocateRegistry.createRegistry(2020, new SslRMIClientSocketFactory(), new SslRMIServerSocketFactory(null, null, true));
            System.out.println("RMI registry running on port " + 2020);             

            Registry registry = LocateRegistry.getRegistry("DAVE-PC", 2020, new SslRMIClientSocketFactory());

            registry.bind("Hello",  server);

        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.err.println("Server exception: " + e.toString());
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }

    private static void setSettings() {

        String pass = "password";

        System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.debug", "all");

    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.keyStore", "C:\\ssl\\serverkeystore.jks");
    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.keyStorePassword", pass);
    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.trustStore", "C:\\ssl\\servertruststore.jks");
    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.trustStorePassword", pass);




    }

}

Client.java

import java.rmi.registry.LocateRegistry;
import java.rmi.registry.Registry;
import javax.rmi.ssl.SslRMIClientSocketFactory;

public class Client {

    private Client() {}

    public static void main(String[] args) {        

        try {

            setSettings();  

            Registry registry = LocateRegistry.getRegistry("DAVE-PC", 2020, new SslRMIClientSocketFactory());

            Hello hello = (Hello) registry.lookup("Hello");

            String message = hello.sayHello();

            System.out.println(message);            

        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.err.println("Client exception: " + e.toString());
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

private static void setSettings() {

        String pass = "password";
        System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.debug", "all");
    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.keyStore", "C:\\ssl\\clientkeystore.jks");
    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.keyStorePassword", pass);
    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.trustStore", "C:\\ssl\\clienttruststore.jks");
    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.trustStorePassword", pass);

    }

}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The PKIX error means that the client didn't trust the server certificate, where the server in this case was the Registry.

To clarify, you need two private keys and two keystores to hold them in, one each. You then need to create certificates in each keystore, export them, and import them into the peer's truststore. The server's truststore must trust the client's keystore, and vice versa.

Your code looks mostly OK. The result of createRegistry() should be stored in a static variable, to prevent it being GC'd. You don't need a serialVersionUID in the server class, whatever your IDE may tell you. It doesn't get serialized, at least not by RMI.

EDIT The problem is here:

System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.keyStore", "C:\\ssl\\keystore-server.jks");
System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.trustStore", "C:\\ssl\\truststore-client.jks");

which should be:

System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.keyStore", "C:\\ssl\\keystore-server.jks");
System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.trustStore", "C:\\ssl\\truststore-server.jks");

and here:

System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.keyStore", "C:\\ssl\\keystore-client.jks");
System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.trustStore", "C:\\ssl\\truststore-server.jks"

which should be:

System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.keyStore", "C:\\ssl\\keystore-client.jks");
System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.trustStore", "C:\\ssl\\truststore-client.jks"

EDIT 2 The underlying problem is that the trust store you need when binding to the Registry is the client truststore, but the truststore you need when running the server is the server truststore.

There are at least three possible solutions, in increasing order of merit:

  1. Set up a subclass of SslRMIClientSocketFactory with its own SSLContext with its own TrustManager loaded from the client truststore, and override createSocket(). Ouch.

  2. Import the server's certificate into the server's truststore as well.

  3. Use the return value of createRegistry() to do the bind() instead of calling getRegistry() in the server at all, and avoid the whole problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks EJP. I tried re-generating the keys and this time importing the exported certificates into the opposite truststore. I'm now getting a signature check failed error, have enabled more ssl logging so more detail here: pastebin.com/yNaKJN2N (error towards the bottom!). I used the following script to generate keys/export/import etc: pastebin.com/Vn2uq0Vb. Any ideas? –  swiss196 Feb 5 '14 at 23:38
    
You must have done something wrong. Can you post the exact steps you took for the server keystore and client truststore? NB Your code suggests you are using the client keystore and the server truststore: that's not correct, it should be the client truststore, and that's the one you should have exported the server certificate into. –  EJP Feb 6 '14 at 0:02
    
Here is the output of the bat script I linked to so you can see my steps, as far as I know everything is okay. pastebin.com/dnTJiGrz. Additionally, I have edited my post to reflect the current code (using the filenames generated by the bat script). –  swiss196 Feb 6 '14 at 0:35
1  
OK, see 2nd edit. –  EJP Feb 6 '14 at 0:58
    
EJP, I can't believe it was that simple - you are a legend, truly. I used the return of createRegistry() as opposed to calling the getRegistry() and it works a charm. And even better, I actually understand the issue! :) –  swiss196 Feb 6 '14 at 1:10

try this:

    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.keyStore", "C:\\ssl\\keystore-client");
    System.setProperty("javax.net.ssl.trustStore", "C:\\ssl\\truststore-server");

Without the ".jks" extention, and also just "C:\ssl" of that doesn't work.

share|improve this answer
    
If your first suggestion implies that Java adds '.jks' automatically, it is incorrect. If you're not suggesting that, I don't see how you can know better than the OP what his filenames are. The second suggestion definitely won't work. -1 –  EJP Feb 5 '14 at 21:21
    
Hi the @EJP. Not sure why you down voted this. On IBM WebSphere MQ you do have to specify the filename without the extension for keyStore and trustStore, that's why I was guessing that this might be the same. I was only making a "suggestion", because sometimes when you are trying to figure out things, it's good to have some good suggestions rather than none. I also looked online before I posted and that's why I suggested leaving off the ".jks" extension, since I saw this on some other post (not on stackoverflow). –  Alvin Bunk Feb 5 '14 at 21:32
    
On IBM WebSphere you may have to remove the .jks when configuring the server via a screen. That has nothing to do with the correct values of these system properties in ordinary Java code. The simple reason for the downvote is that your answer is incorrect. –  EJP Feb 5 '14 at 22:19
1  
I appreciate your input, but unfortunately EJP is correct, my filenames & paths are correct. –  swiss196 Feb 5 '14 at 23:39

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