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I am trying to make my javascript conform to the best practice for returning values from a function. Currently, I declare a variable, process that variable in the function and then return it. I thought it was good practice to explicitly state things, but I am wondering if that's just a myth in my head and there are better ways. So of the two methods, or even neither of these, which is best? Thanks

Example A:

function foo( a ){

    var str = "";

    if (a == "bar"){
        str = "barbar";
    } else {
        str = "foofoo";
    }

    return str;
}

Example B:

function foo( a ){

    if (a == "bar"){
        return "barbar";
    } else {
        return "foofoo";
    }
}
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closed as primarily opinion-based by Denys Séguret, Ian, Bill Woodger, kapep, Qantas 94 Heavy Feb 19 '14 at 12:48

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Why write extra code like that? – SLaks Feb 5 '14 at 19:51
    
Isn't it easier to see what's returned in the second one ? – Denys Séguret Feb 5 '14 at 19:51
    
I suspect this depends strongly on what your code does. In the case of the former, I would do this only if I had a return value I was doing concatenation throughout the function, whereas I would typically do the latter. – Seiyria Feb 5 '14 at 19:51
1  
If you can't think of a descriptive, meaningful name for a variable, that variable probably shouldn't exist. – SLaks Feb 5 '14 at 19:52
1  
Similar discussion of programmers.SE: programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/118703/… – hugomg Feb 5 '14 at 19:59
up vote 1 down vote accepted

In Javascript there is a very small performance improvement for B as in example A you have an additional variable str that must be looked up in the local scope 3 times (initialise, set one or other value, and return).

Example A is actually something like this under the covers (note that you can't actually explicitly access the local object, any var you declare is on it automatically):

function foo( a ){

    local["str"] = "";

    if (a == "bar"){
        local["str"] = "barbar";
    } else {
        local["str"] = "foofoo";
    }

    return local["str"];
}

However, you will need to hit this a lot of times to see the difference - it's going to be near negligible, and possibly eliminated completely in the latest optimised Javascript engines (as seen in better browsers). I'm pretty sure Chrome's V8 engine does.

Outside of that it is a question of coding style - many teams prefer A because you can set a watch on str and always know what it holds. Personally I prefer B because it's more spartan and because I find short-circuited logic easier to follow, but many developers don't like it because if they miss an early return they can find bugs hard to follow.

It's really a 'house style' question.

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great explanation of how things work. thank you :) – Phil Feb 6 '14 at 14:59

In Example B you could do the following and that would be what I would do, you don't need the extra else since you are returning if you evaluate true:

function foo( a ){
    if (a == "bar"){
        return "barbar";
    }
    return "foofoo";   
}
share|improve this answer

In your example I'm not sure if either one is technically better. A good use case for this would be inside of a loop, if you get the result that you're looking for, then return the value immediately. If you do it this way your loop won't have to continue executing when you already got the result you wanted.

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