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I'm trying to do a simple reverse task like: change the string "how are you" to "you are how".

this is my code:

public class Program {
    public static String revSentence (String str) {
        String [] givenString = str.split(" ");
        String [] retString = new String[givenString.length];

        int last = givenString.length - 1;

        for (int i = 0; i < givenString.length; i++) {
            retString [i] = givenString[last--]; 
        }

        return retString.toString();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String m = "how are you";
        System.out.println(revSentence(m));
    }
}

I'm getting a weird output:

[Ljava.lang.String;@e76cbf7
share|improve this question
1  
Calling toString() on an array will not give you anything useful. You want StringBuilder. – SLaks Feb 5 '14 at 21:43
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a solution:

public class Program {
    public static String revSentence (String str) {
        String retString = "";
        String [] givenString = str.split(" ");

        for (int i=givenString.length-1; i>=0; i--) {
            retString += givenString[i] + " "; 
        }
        return retString;
    }


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String m = "how are you";
        System.out.print(revSentence(m));
    }

}

Modified it to make the "revSentence" function return a String, plus improved the code a bit. Enjoy!

share|improve this answer
    
that is great solution, but in the task i need to return a string..:? – JohnBigs Feb 5 '14 at 21:55
    
You're missing a newline that markdown needs inbetween the code block and the first sentence. – Johannes H. Feb 5 '14 at 22:17
    
@JohnBigs, I modified my code. Is that what you meant? To have the "revSentence" function just return a String as opposed to a string array? – Alvin Bunk Feb 5 '14 at 22:17
    
Oh, and thank's for giving correct index values in your for loop, mine were off by one, just noticed while reading your code ;) – Johannes H. Feb 5 '14 at 22:19

The output isn't "weird" at all - it's the Object's internal string representation, created by Object.toString(). String[] doesnt override that. If you want to output all entires, loop through them and concatenate them, Best using a StringBuilder to avoid creating unnecessary String instances.

public static String arrayToString (String[] array) {
    StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
    for (String value : array) {
        result.append(value);
    }
    return StringBuilder.toString();
}

If you don'T need that method on it'S own and want to include it in the overall process of reversing the sentence, this is how it may look. It iterates only once, iterating backwards (= counting down) to reverse the sentence.

public static String revSentence (String str) {
    String []     givenString = str.split(" ");
    StringBuilder result      = new StringBuilder();

    // no need for 'last', we can use i to count down as well...
    for (int i = givenString.length - 1 ; i >= 0; i--) { 
        result.append(givenString[i]);
    }
    return result.toString();
}

[Edit]: because of the OPs comment to one of the other answers, about not having learned how to use StringBUilder yet, here is a arrayToStirng method without using one. Note however that this should not be done normally, as it creates useless instances of String whiche are not cleaned up by the GC because of the immutable nature of String(all instances are kept for reuse).

public static String arrayToString (String[] array) {
    String result = "";
    for (String value : array) {
        result += value;
    }
    return result;
}

Or, without a dedicate arrayToString method:

public static String revSentence (String str) {
    String []     givenString = str.split(" ");
    String        result      = "";

    for (int i = givenString.length-1 ; i >= 0 ; i--) { 
        result += givenString[i];
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great answer @Johannes, but isn't StringBuilder a bit overkill for what the user wants to accomplish? Since a for loop is used, I don't know if there is any speed advantage here? – Alvin Bunk Feb 5 '14 at 22:26
    
@AlvinBunk Not necessarily speed, but still performance. As String is immutable, appending two strings always creates a new instance. The old instaces are kept internally for reuse by String, so that no additional instances need to be created if the same string is used again (which is great in bigger programs, but it's unlikely we need them again here). This prevents the GC from clearing them. Using a Stringbuilder (which stores chars in some sort of array or list internally) circumvents that, without adding too much overhead (maybe resizing the internal array). – Johannes H. Feb 5 '14 at 22:29
    
We could improve performance even more if we didn'T split the string (and creating new string instances for each word), but reading it char by char, storing the chars in a list, and starting a new list every time we reach whitespace. But THIS I would consider an overkill ;) – Johannes H. Feb 5 '14 at 22:32
    
Thanks @Johannes! That makes sense. – Alvin Bunk Feb 5 '14 at 22:39

Calling toString() on an array object (in your case retString) doesn't print all array entries, instead it prints object address.

You should print array entries by iterating over them.

share|improve this answer
    
at first when i just tried to return retString i got an error that i cane convert string[] to string...so how can i just return a string there and use syso to print it out in the main? cause we only learned some basics, we didn't get to string builder ..@Juvanis – JohnBigs Feb 5 '14 at 21:49
    
My answers features arrayToString and the whole reversing all-in-one (depending on what you prefer), with and without strinbuiolder, so you have a comparison there on what (roughly) StringBuilder does. – Johannes H. Feb 5 '14 at 22:07

Use this code for reversed string

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
for(String s : retString) {
    builder.append(s);
}
return builder.toString();
share|improve this answer
    
StringBuilder features reverseon it's own... :) – Johannes H. Feb 5 '14 at 21:51
1  
that reverse is something else. "Hello World" to "olleH dlroW" where as he wants "World Hello" – Wajahat Feb 5 '14 at 21:52
    
Oh! well... yepp. Didn't get that. Editing my answer accordingly, thanks! – Johannes H. Feb 5 '14 at 21:55
    
Done. My anser should now feature a solution that only iterates once (not twice, one time to reverse the string and another time to concatenate). – Johannes H. Feb 5 '14 at 22:02
    
It iterates only once but since String is immutable in java, it might be slower. It creates a new string and copies the concatenated string in the new string and copy is a really costly operation as far as I remember from my algorithms class. – Wajahat Feb 5 '14 at 22:10

Calling toString on an array gives you the memory ref which isn't very useful. Try this:

public static String revSentence (String str) {
    String[] givenString = str.split(" ");

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = givenString.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        sb.append(givenString[i]);
        if (i != 0)
          sb.append(" ");
    }
    return sb.toString();
}
share|improve this answer

the for loop start from greater length to lower and builder.append(givenString[i] + " "); this will concatenate String and return whole sentence you are how you could use both mySentence += givenString[i] + " "; or builder.append(givenString[i] + " "); but the best way is to use StringBuilder class (see docs)

public class Program {
public static String revSentence(String str) {
    String[] givenString = str.split(" ");
    String[] retString = new String[givenString.length];

    int last = givenString.length - 1;
    //String mySentence = "";

    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

    for (int i = givenString.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        // retString [i] = givenString[i];
        // mySentence += givenString[i] + " ";
        builder.append(givenString[i] + " ");
    }

    return builder.toString(); // retuning String
            //return mySentence;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String m = "how are you";
    System.out.println(revSentence(m));
}

}

share|improve this answer
3  
This is not a good solution since the loop to concatenate is creating a new string on every iteration (String in JAVA is immutable). Use StringBuilder for it. – Wajahat Feb 5 '14 at 22:07
    
This is especially bad as Stringisntances are kept internally by the String class for future reuse (because of the immutable nature of String this usually improves performance if one avoids to create unnecessary instances), so the garbage collector cannot even remove them. – Johannes H. Feb 5 '14 at 22:09
    
thanks for info i ve made some changes in my answer – mohsin azeem Feb 5 '14 at 22:20
    
Instead of doing builder.append(givenString[i] + " ") it's better to do builder.append(givenString[i]);if(i>0){builder.append(' ');}, because otherwise you still generate intermediate strings (and you also solve the problem that your code inserts an extraneous space at the end) – miniBill Feb 10 '14 at 10:16
    
You're also declaring last and retString but not using them. Fix those and I'll un-downvote :) – miniBill Feb 10 '14 at 10:18

Faster, and shorter: To reverse a word, use:

public String reverseWord(String s) {
    StringBuilder y = new StringBuilder(s);
    return y.reverse();
}

Now split and use this method and use Stringbuidler.append to concatenate the all. And dont forget the space inbetween.

share|improve this answer
    
Nope, not what the op wants - made the same error. This reverses the whole string, but only words should be swapped but kept in right order internally. – Johannes H. Feb 5 '14 at 21:58
1  
@JohannesH. yes updated – AlexWien Feb 5 '14 at 22:02
    
Reverse, reverses the characters, which is not what is desired... – Alvin Bunk Feb 5 '14 at 22:05

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