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I am trying to create tables in perl using DBI. This is my code:

#! usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.014;
use DBI;

my $user = "user";
my $password = "password";
my $hostname = "localhost";
my $database = 'database';

my $dsn = "DBI:mysql:database=$database;host=$hostname;";
my $dbh = DBI->connect($dsn, $user, $password, { RaiseError => 1});


my $create = "-- drop table if exists DEVICE;
CREATE TABLE DEVICE(
    NAME          CHAR(60),
    ID            CHAR(36)    NOT NULL,
    SHORT_ID      INT UNSIGNED,
    MODEL         CHAR(50),
    SERIAL_NUMBER VARCHAR(50),
    IP_ADDRESS    CHAR(50),
    LOCATION      CHAR(50),
    DV_VERSION    CHAR(20),
    OS_VERSION    CHAR(20),
    DEVICE_GROUP  CHAR(50),
    MANAGED       TINYINT     NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT PK_DEVICE PRIMARY KEY (ID)
) Engine = InnoDB;

-- drop table if exists SEGMENT;
CREATE TABLE SEGMENT(
    ID               CHAR(100)        NOT NULL,
    DEVICE_ID        CHAR(36)         NOT NULL,
    NAME             CHAR(60),
    IP_ADDRESS       CHAR(50),
    SLOT_INDEX       INT    NOT NULL,
    SEGMENT_INDEX    INT    NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT PK_SEGMENT PRIMARY KEY (ID),
    KEY(DEVICE_ID),
    CONSTRAINT FK_PARENT_DEV FOREIGN KEY (DEVICE_ID) REFERENCES DEVICE(ID)
) Engine = InnoDB;
";
my $sth = $dbh->prepare($create);
$sth->execute;

I get the following error when I run this:

DBD::mysql::st execute failed: You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'CREATE TABLE SEGMENT(
ID               CHAR(100)        NOT NULL,
DEVICE' at line 18 at file.pl line 47.

When I copy/paste the exact same string that is in $create directly in mysql it works perfectly.

Please help, thanks.

Edit: Sorry, I should have clarified. I am pulling what is in $create from another source. This is only part of it and I can't edit the text. I guess I need to know how to split it into an array and execute them one by one.

share|improve this question
3  
Some db layer doesn't like to execute multiple queries in the same step. Anyway the queries look normal. It worth a try to split the big query string into different queries. –  Lajos Veres Feb 5 at 21:46
1  
According to this PerlMonks thread, the MySQL client library C API limits you to one SQL statement at a time. –  ThisSuitIsBlackNot Feb 5 at 21:52
1  
@CircuitB0T: You can't conveniently validate the safety of a bunch of SQL statements. That is why this is a bad idea. If all you want is to empty the table (rather than change its specification) you could just do DELETE FROM mytable. –  Borodin Feb 5 at 22:04
1  
My point with the validation comment was that it's very dangerous to execute arbitrary SQL from an external source. As Borodin said, validation is not really feasible. Do you really have to create the tables inside your application? –  ThisSuitIsBlackNot Feb 5 at 22:15
1  
@CircuitB0T: If the only way you can get a table specification from the API is to retrieve a MySQL command-line source file then it has been designed very badly. You can't in general just split on semicolons it is entirely possible that the body of the statement contains semicolons within quoted strings. I don't know what to suggest really. You really need a new interface added to the API, which may be trivial to do - you should at least take this problem to your manager and ask. –  Borodin Feb 5 at 22:26

3 Answers 3

The DBI connection doesn't work like the MySQL command-line tool. You can't execute more than one SQL statement at one, and you don't need the -- prefix.

(It's also notable that you have reversed the convention of upper case SQL language words and lower case identifiers.)

Code like this should work

$dbh->do("drop table if exists DEVICE");
$dbh->do(<<__ENDSQL__);
CREATE TABLE DEVICE(
    NAME          CHAR(60),
    ID            CHAR(36)    NOT NULL,
    SHORT_ID      INT UNSIGNED,
    MODEL         CHAR(50),
    SERIAL_NUMBER VARCHAR(50),
    IP_ADDRESS    CHAR(50),
    LOCATION      CHAR(50),
    DV_VERSION    CHAR(20),
    OS_VERSION    CHAR(20),
    DEVICE_GROUP  CHAR(50),
    MANAGED       TINYINT     NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT PK_DEVICE PRIMARY KEY (ID)
) Engine = InnoDB
__ENDSQL__

$dbh->do("drop table if exists SEGMENT");
$dbh->do(<<__ENDSQL__);
CREATE TABLE SEGMENT(
    ID               CHAR(100)        NOT NULL,
    DEVICE_ID        CHAR(36)         NOT NULL,
    NAME             CHAR(60),
    IP_ADDRESS       CHAR(50),
    SLOT_INDEX       INT    NOT NULL,
    SEGMENT_INDEX    INT    NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT PK_SEGMENT PRIMARY KEY (ID),
    KEY(DEVICE_ID),
    CONSTRAINT FK_PARENT_DEV FOREIGN KEY (DEVICE_ID) REFERENCES DEVICE(ID)
) Engine = InnoDB
__ENDSQL__
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I should have mentioned that I am pulling from an api and cannot edit the format to this. –  CircuitB0T Feb 5 at 22:03
    
@CircuitB0T If you mean you get the whole DDL as one big string value then split it out as another response suggested. But execute the statments with do as shown here. –  Neil Lunn Feb 6 at 12:12

You are doing everything right, just a slight change, execute those two queries separately, put this code, after $create:

 my $delim = "-- ";    // delimeter
 my @sqls = split($delim, $create);   //split based on delimiter

 foreach my $sql (@sqls) {   // take each sql string 
      $sql = $delim . $sql;  // append delimiter, as it was removed while splitting the sql string
      my $sth = $dbh->prepare($sql);   // prepare the sql statement
      $sth->execute;   // execute it
 }

 exit 0;

PS: this is a tested code.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't imagine this working with the SQL the OP posted, as there are actually four queries, not two: drop table if exists DEVICE, CREATE TABLE DEVICE, drop table if exists SEGMENT, and CREATE TABLE SEGMENT. –  ThisSuitIsBlackNot Feb 6 at 15:19
    
look at the $create variable that is posted, the drop statements are commented with -- –  thekosmix Feb 6 at 16:02
    
Never mind, didn't notice that you re-add the -- inside the loop. If you're going to take this approach, splitting on ; makes more sense, but oh well. –  ThisSuitIsBlackNot Feb 6 at 16:17

If pulling in raw sql from an external source isn't a bad enough idea, you could always make it worse:

open my $fh, "mysql |";
print $fh "$create\n";
close $fh;

Between the "mysql" and the | pipe, you need the credentials --user=username, etc., and the name of the default database.

Or, with DBI, if the SQL statements are properly crafted, like mydqldump generates, then ;\n will always be the statement delimiter, so you should have reasonable luck splitting the string... in fact, you can even throw away the semicolon -- MySQL doesn't actually care.

If you have anything more complex, like stored procedures preceded by a DELIMITER declaration, you'll need to parse for those statements, modify your expectation for a delimiter accordingly, and discard the delimiter statements along with the alternate delimiter. You don't need, and in fact cannot use, delimiter declarations and custom delimiters with DBI -- you just send the procedure declaration in one ->do() call, and it works.

You should be able to get away with the -- comment lines, as- is, once you split on the delimiters... those should not have to be stripped.

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