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So I am having a bit of an issue here deciding what tools to use to solve this problem. It is a rather complex problem but I will do my best to describe it.

At the moment I have a relationship of values gathered and stored in a hash. The hash way of doing things can be changed to anything else that you think is better. I just used hash for now to keep the relationship as it is important.

So something like:

key  -> value

1456 -> 1
1532 -> 50
1892 -> 2
1092 -> 5
1487 -> 10
5641 -> 5
1234 -> 2
1687 -> 1

My goal here is to take the values, and adjust them so that there are no duplicates, and then place the adjusted values back in their appropriate relationship with the key. Basically I do not want the duplicate values deleted, I want them changed in a way so that there are no duplicates anymore. (duplicates in example above are: 1 and 2)

As a side note here is a summary of a few important things to keep in mind for my situation:

  • the relationship between the key-value pairs (must always know which value is for what key)
  • not having any duplicate values
  • you cannot delete a key-value pair, only change the value.
  • the order of values from lowest to highest is important

Normally I would have no trouble sorting an array of integers, but in this case it is the relationship with other values that is giving me a lot of trouble with this.

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What are the rules to change a value to make it unique? –  Matt Feb 5 at 23:10
    
I think I understand. Would the following qualify as a solution: { 1456 => 1, 1532 => 50, 1892 => 3, 1092 => 5, 1487 => 10, 5641 => 5, 1234 => 4, 1687 => 2}? What about { 1456 => 1, 1532 => 7, 1892 => 3, 1092 => 5, 1487 => 6, 5641 => 5, 1234 => 4, 1687 => 2}? Please give a yes/no answer to each question. By the way, this is how you should have written your hash. –  Cary Swoveland Feb 5 at 23:18
    
Basically make sure the value stays in its relative order with the other numbers, so basically for the values: 1 2 2 4, the key-value pairs with value 2 must always stay in their relative position with key-value pairs with values 1 and 4 (i hope that made sense)... –  user3075099 Feb 5 at 23:20
    
So if you have 1,2,2,3,50, can this simply go to 1,2,3,4,5, or do you need to keep the 50: 1,2,3,4,50? –  Matt Feb 5 at 23:25
1  
This makes no sense. You need to values to be unique, but it doesn't matter what they are? Why not just use an array of the keys? It has ordering as one of the features of the data structure. –  Zach Kemp Feb 5 at 23:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted
input = { 1456 => 1,
  1532 => 50,
  1892 => 2,
  1092 => 5,
  1487 => 10,
  5641 => 5,
  1234 => 2,
  1687 => 1 }

values = input.sort_by { |a,b| b }.map { |a,b| a }
# => [1456, 1687, 1892, 1234, 1092, 5641, 1487, 1532]
Hash[*values.flat_map.with_index(1) { |a,i| [a,i] }]
# => {1456=>1, 1687=>2, 1892=>3, 1234=>4, 1092=>5, 5641=>6, 1487=>7, 1532=>8}

All the necessary information is contained in the values array.

share|improve this answer
    
Considering that the values need only be distinct and preserve order, I would suggest something more interesting, like: {1456 => "I love donuts, hmmm", 1687 => "I love donuts, hmmmm,...}" –  Cary Swoveland Feb 5 at 23:46
    
@CarySwoveland lol –  Matt Feb 5 at 23:48
    
always interesting with donuts :) nice, you hit it spot on, cheers! –  user3075099 Feb 5 at 23:51

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