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I'm trying to use Scipy leastsq to find the best fit of a "square" grid for a set of measured points coordinates in 2-D (the experimental points are approximately on a square grid).

The parameters of the grid are pitch (equal for x and y), the center position (center_x and center_y) and rotation (in degree).

I defined an error function calculating the euclidean distance for each pairs of points (experimental vs ideal grid) and taking the mean. I want to minimize this function thorugh leastsq but I get an error.

Here are the function definitions:

import numpy as np
from scipy.optimize import leastsq

def get_spot_grid(shape, pitch, center_x, center_y, rotation=0):
    x_spots, y_spots = np.meshgrid(
             (np.arange(shape[1]) - (shape[1]-1)/2.)*pitch, 
             (np.arange(shape[0]) - (shape[0]-1)/2.)*pitch)
    theta = rotation/180.*np.pi
    x_spots = x_spots*np.cos(theta) - y_spots*np.sin(theta) + center_x
    y_spads = x_spots*np.sin(theta) + y_spots*np.cos(theta) + center_y
    return x_spots, y_spots

def get_mean_distance(x1, y1, x2, y2):
    return np.sqrt((x1 - x2)**2 + (y1 - y2)**2).mean()

def err_func(params, xe, ye):
    pitch, center_x, center_y, rotation = params
    x_grid, y_grid = get_spot_grid(xe.shape, pitch, center_x, center_y, rotation)
    return get_mean_distance(x_grid, y_grid, xe, ye)

This are the experimental coordinates:

xe = np.array([ -23.31,  -4.01,  15.44,  34.71, -23.39,  -4.10,  15.28,  34.60, -23.75,  -4.38,  15.07,  34.34, -23.91,  -4.53,  14.82,  34.15]).reshape(4, 4)
ye = np.array([-16.00, -15.81, -15.72, -15.49,   3.29,   3.51,   3.90,   4.02,  22.75,  22.93,  23.18,  23.43,  42.19,  42.35,  42.69,  42.87]).reshape(4, 4)

I try to use leastsq in this way:

leastsq(err_func, x0=(19, 12, 5, 0), args=(xe, ye))

but I get the following error:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
TypeError                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-19-ee91cf6ce7d6> in <module>()
----> 1 leastsq(err_func, x0=(19, 12, 5, 0), args=(xe, ye))

C:\Anaconda\lib\site-packages\scipy\optimize\minpack.pyc in leastsq(func, x0, args, Dfun, full_output, col_deriv, ftol, xtol, gtol, maxfev, epsfcn, factor, diag)
    369     m = shape[0]
    370     if n > m:
--> 371         raise TypeError('Improper input: N=%s must not exceed M=%s' % (n, m))
    372     if epsfcn is None:
    373         epsfcn = finfo(dtype).eps

TypeError: Improper input: N=4 must not exceed M=1

I can't figure out what's the problem here :(

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since the leastsq function assumes that the err_function return an array of residuals docs and it is a little difficult to write the err_function in this manner why not use another scipy's function - minimize. Then you add your metric - the error function you already have and it works. However, I think there is one more typo in get_spot_grid function (y_spots vs y_spads). The complete code:

import numpy as np
from scipy.optimize import leastsq, minimize

def get_spot_grid(shape, pitch, center_x, center_y, rotation=0):
    x_spots, y_spots = np.meshgrid(
             (np.arange(shape[1]) - (shape[1]-1)/2.)*pitch, 
             (np.arange(shape[0]) - (shape[0]-1)/2.)*pitch)
    theta = rotation/180.*np.pi
    x_spots = x_spots*np.cos(theta) - y_spots*np.sin(theta) + center_x
    y_spots = x_spots*np.sin(theta) + y_spots*np.cos(theta) + center_y
    return x_spots, y_spots


def get_mean_distance(x1, y1, x2, y2):
    return np.sqrt((x1 - x2)**2 + (y1 - y2)**2).mean()


def err_func(params, xe, ye):
    pitch, center_x, center_y, rotation = params
    x_grid, y_grid = get_spot_grid(xe.shape, pitch, center_x, center_y, rotation)
    return get_mean_distance(x_grid, y_grid, xe, ye)

xe = np.array([-23.31,  -4.01,  15.44,  34.71, -23.39,  -4.10,  15.28,  34.60, -23.75,  -4.38,  15.07,  34.34, -23.91,  -4.53,  14.82,  34.15]).reshape(4, 4)
ye = np.array([-16.00, -15.81, -15.72, -15.49,   3.29,   3.51,   3.90,   4.02,  22.75,  22.93,  23.18,  23.43,  42.19,  42.35,  42.69,  42.87]).reshape(4, 4)

# leastsq(err_func, x0=(19, 12, 5, 0), args=(xe, ye))
minimize(err_func, x0=(19, 12, 5, 0), args=(xe, ye))
share|improve this answer
    
Your solution works, and you spotted also the typo, thanks. –  user2304916 Feb 6 at 19:06
    
Also, the leastsq solution requires flattening the arrays that contains the coordinates (xe, ye), because does not work with 2D arrays, don't know why. –  user2304916 Feb 6 at 19:07
    
If you flatten the array I believe that leastsq will minimize the sum of squares of residues. Whereas your objective function (get_mean_distance) is basically sum of euclidean distances of measured to fitted points. Slightly different thing but it depends what you want. –  Martin Feb 7 at 7:57

The function passed to leastsq (e.g. err_func) should return an array of values of the same shape as xeand ye -- that is, one residual for each value of xe and ye.

def err_func(params, xe, ye):
    pitch, center_x, center_y, rotation = params
    x_grid, y_grid = get_spot_grid(xe.shape, pitch, center_x, center_y, rotation)
    return get_mean_distance(x_grid, y_grid, xe, ye)

The call to mean() in get_mean_distance is reducing the return value to a single scalar. Keep in mind that the xe and ye passed to err_func are arrays not scalars.

The error message

TypeError: Improper input: N=4 must not exceed M=1

is saying the number of the parameters, 4, should not exceed the number of residuals returned by err_func, 1.


The program can be made runnable by changing the call to mean() to mean(axis=0) (i.e. take the mean of each column) or mean(axis=1) (i.e. take the mean of each row):

def get_mean_distance(x1, y1, x2, y2):
    return np.sqrt((x1 - x2)**2 + (y1 - y2)**2).mean(axis=1)

I don't really understand your code well enough to know which it should be. But the idea is that there should be one value for each "point" in xe and ye.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah ok, got it. However removing .mean() I obtain error: Result from function call is not a proper array of floats. –  user2304916 Feb 6 at 1:57
    
The array of coordinates is not flat, has the same shape as the grid. So removing .mean() altogether will return an array with same shape as xe and each element is a distance. But now I get the error in the comment above. –  user2304916 Feb 6 at 2:00

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