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There is an inner div of fixed width and variable height contained by an outer div. The inner div should have a 5px margin on all 4 sides between it and the outer div.

How can this be achieved if the height of inner div is not specified?

With the height of the inner div specified this is very simple. But the inner div is a content container for a masterpage. The content going into this div will have a different height for each page that uses the master page.

If the inner divs height is not set, the bottom margin (between where the inner div ends and the outer div ends) is always 2-3px too long. i.e. 5 5 5 8 This happens across browser types.

Here is the CSS:

#contentframe
{
    position: relative;
    width: 1010px;
    left: 0px;
    top: 0px;
    margin: 0px;
    padding-top:5px;
    padding-bottom:5px;
    padding-left: 14px;
}
#content
{
    position: relative;
    left: 0px;
    top: 0px;
    width: 980px;
    margin: 0px;
    padding: 0px;
    background-color: #cccccc;

}

* Note: Setting margin-bottom of #content to 5px does not work.

HTML:

    <div id="contentframe">
        <div id="content">
            variable height content will go in here
        </div>
    </div>

This should be dead simple. Set: Outer divs padding to 5px and that's it. But that only works if inner divs height is specified. Otherwise there is an annoyingly "high" bottom margin.

EDIT: Full Source

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head id="Head1" runat="server">
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<style type="text/css"> 
body
{
    -x-system-font: none;
    background-color: #A2A2A2;
    margin-top: 0px;
    margin-bottom: 35px;
    padding: 0px;
}
#centeredframe
{
    width: 1010px;
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
    margin-top: 0px;
    padding: 0px;
}

#contentframe
{
    position: relative;
    width: 1010px;
    left: 0px;
    top: 0px;
    margin: 0px;
    padding-top: 5px;
    padding-bottom: 5px;
    padding-left: 5px;
    background-color: #ffffff;
}

#content
{
    position: relative;
    left: 0px;
    top: 0px;
    width: 1005px;
    margin: 0px;
    padding: 0px;
    height:300px;
    color: #ffffff;
    background-color: #000000;
}

</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="centeredframe">
        <div id="contentframe">
            <div id="content">
                <p>hgjghjghjghjg<p>
                <p>hgjghjghjghjg<p>
                <p>hgjghjghjghjg<p>
                <p>hgjghjghjghjg<p>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
Dont tell me I m going to have to "fix" this with script ;( –  rism Jan 29 '10 at 2:08
    
I should also add at this point, taht simply specifying a border for the inner div wont work because "in reality" the outer div uses a background image for a better faded/aesthetic effect. Its been omitted here for simplicity. So the issue is not how do I wrap a white border around a div. Its definitely a positioning/sizing issue. –  rism Jan 29 '10 at 3:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should work on IE7/8 and other non-IE browsers.

The extra 'padding/margin' to the top and/or bottom is introduced by the <p> elements. This is due to the uncollapsing margin for empty-content/padding/border areas (in this case, the contentFrame). Refer to the W3C Box Model on collapsing margins.

There are a few ways around it, one of which is to introduce a thin (1px) border which blends into the background of the DIV and then compensating with the width/height. Below is another hack by manipulating the margin/padding of the <P> element within the content DIV.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head id="Head1" runat="server">
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<style type="text/css"> 
body
{
    -x-system-font: none;
    background-color: #A2A2A2;
    margin: 0;
    margin-bottom: 35px;
    padding: 0px;
}
#centeredframe
{
    width: 1010px;
    margin: 0 auto; /* merged */
    padding: 0;
}

#contentframe
{
    width: 1000px;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 5px;
    background-color: #ffffff;
}
#content
{
    padding: 0;
    color: #ffffff;
    background-color: #000000;
    height: auto;
    min-height: 300px;
}
#content p
{
    margin: 0px; /* removed the default margin of p element*/
    padding: 16px 0; /* replaced with padding to have background*/
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="centeredframe">
        <div id="contentframe">
            <div id="content">
                <p>hgjghjghjghjg</p>
                <p>hgjghjghjghjg</p>
                <p>hgjghjghjghjg</p>
                <p>hgjghjghjghjg</p>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
There is actually a background image for outer div that puts a nice fade around the outer divs border. The padding-left:14px is there to achieve the desired 5px offset for the inner div. i.e. 9px of fade the 5px of #ffffff. If i set bottom:5px then what will that be registered against? The outer div does not have a set height, I want it to stretch to a height of 5px top offset + inner div height (variable) + 5 px. –  rism Jan 29 '10 at 1:56
    
In that case, you can adjust the top, right, left, and bottom values for the content div to suit your need. –  o.k.w Jan 29 '10 at 1:58
    
O.k, so I tried your suggestion but that just increases the differential. i.e. 5 5 5 12. –  rism Jan 29 '10 at 2:02
    
Are you able to see where the 12px are accounted for? E.g. using Firebug's HTML layout tool. It could be due to an additional padding somewhere in the child element of the content OR the content div itself. Try setting the paddings to zero. Btw, the 12 is for the left, isn't that what you want? –  o.k.w Jan 29 '10 at 2:08
    
Sorry I meant 5 5 12 5 –  rism Jan 29 '10 at 2:15

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