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Assume the availability of a function is_prime . Assume a variable n has been associated with positive integer. Write the statements needed to find out how many prime numbers (starting with 2 and going in increasing order with successively higher primes [2,3,5,7,11,13,...]) can be added before exceeding n . Associate this number with the variable k .

 def main():
    n=int(input('n: '))
    k=0
    i=2
    sum=0

    while sum<=n:
        if is_prime(i):
            sum+=i
            i+=1
            k+=1
        print(k)



def is_prime(n):

    for divisor in range(2,int(n**0.5)+1):
        if n/divisor==int(n/divisor):
            return False
    return True

main()

would really appreciate some pointers.

I modified the code a little bit and it is working fine but the program that grades these codes says that I almost certainly should be using a + sign some where. I have no idea. Modified code is:

while sum<=n:

        if is_prime(i):

            sum+=i
            k+=1
            i+=1
    print(k)

output:

n: 10

i: 2

2

i: 3

5

when it should actually go upto i=5 and total =10.

share|improve this question
    
What's your question? –  Hyperboreus Feb 6 '14 at 5:41
    
this program is not working? I don't know how to modify it to make it work. –  user3260982 Feb 6 '14 at 5:46
    
"Not working" is about the most detailed error description you can get on stackoverflow. –  Hyperboreus Feb 6 '14 at 5:47
    
You need to describe what isn't working. What's the output of your program? –  Jesse Mu Feb 6 '14 at 5:49
    
n: 10 3 4 this is my output and the loop is just going on and on. –  user3260982 Feb 6 '14 at 5:53

3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted
if n/divisor==int(n/divisor):

This is wrong. When you divide 2 integers you get integer as a result. So 5/2 = 2. Replace it with

if n%divisor == 0:

EDITED: your modified loop looks almost correct. If I understand your task right it should be

while sum<=n:
    if is_prime(i):
        sum+=i
        k+=1
    i+=1
print(k)

EDITED2: probably you want to stop as soon as sum + next prime is bigger then n and not add another prime value.

while True:
    if is_prime(i):
        if(sum + i > n)
            break;
        else:
            sum += i
            k += 1
    i += 1 
print(k)
share|improve this answer
    
This depends on the python version and we don't even know which one OP uses. But I guess python3 (because of int(input())) and there 5/2 = 2.5. –  Hyperboreus Feb 6 '14 at 6:02
    
Oh, I do not know how it works in python 3. Anyway interpreter dependent implementation is not a way to go. Verifying if division remainder is zero looks more clear and works with any interpreter. –  Sergii Khaperskov Feb 6 '14 at 6:09
1  
This has nothing to do with "interpreter dependence". It is differences between the specs of py2 and py3. Like ínput and raw_input. Btw OP's problem is in his while loop. –  Hyperboreus Feb 6 '14 at 6:11
    
Yup, I am almost certain, the problem is in the while loop. Any idea about how to modify it? –  user3260982 Feb 6 '14 at 6:21

There is actually more efficient why to solve this problem, it is Sieve of Eratosthenes. The basic idea is to generate array of numbers from 2 till n. Then you iterate over this array starting from 2 and replace all numbers, which mod by i == 0 with -1 or delete them.

If you are getting stuck you can check implementation here.

Sieve of Eratosthenes - Finding Primes Python

share|improve this answer
    
We haven't done array yet. Hence, I am using this way. I understand that it is based on Sieve of Eratosthenes idea and that comes from abstract algebra. I have checked my is_prime function and it seems to be working fine. It's the while loop that is giving me the trouble. –  user3260982 Feb 6 '14 at 6:49
    
@cobra may be this link will be helpful :) –  Slow Harry Feb 6 '14 at 6:53

What you certainly ought to be using is the space character around operators. Also, your alignment is wacky. In Python, alignment indicates structure, and your rewrite will make any interpreter complain (at least, at it's displayed here). If a program (or a robotic TA) is reading and grading your work, and it thinks you need a + sign somewhere, then perhaps it wants to see "sum = sum + i" somewhere. I'll use that. So try this:

def main():
    n = int(input('n: '))
    k = 0
    i = 2
    sum = 0

    while sum <= n:
        if is_prime(i):
            sum = sum + i  # nothing wrong with "sum += i"
            k += 1
        i += 1    # put this inside "if" ==> loop forever 
    print(k)

def is_prime(m):
    for divisor in range(2, int(m**0.5) + 1):
        if m % divisor == 0:
            return False
    return True

main()
share|improve this answer
    
Now, it says that I am using an incorrect number somewhere. Go figure. –  user3260982 Feb 6 '14 at 6:40
    
Maybe it means 0.5. Try being simple-minded: change the loop in is_prime to: for divisor in range(2, n-1): # same as before You'll want to add a check in main that n >= 2 :) If it isn't, print 0 then return. –  BrianO Feb 6 '14 at 6:43
    
Oops, can't edit my comment above anymore. If I could, it'd read: change the loop in is_prime to: for divisor in range(2, n-1): # same loop body as before –  BrianO Feb 6 '14 at 6:51
    
"Unaccept" after nearly 2 months - huh? –  BrianO Mar 28 '14 at 16:31

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