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Here is my code:

def isEven(number):
    return number % 2 == 0

def run(x):
    z = x
    while z != 1:
        if isEven(z) == True:
            z = z/2
            print z
        else:
            z = (3*z)+1
            print z
    else:
        print 'Got one!'
        #To see if the collatz does indeed always work
    x+=1

It works up until 999, at which it continues indefinitely, print Got one! 999, eventually raising a Segmentation Fault: 22. How do I fix this?

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closed as off-topic by Hyperboreus, user2357112, mhlester, senshin, Dimitri M Feb 28 at 7:05

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question appears to be off-topic because it lacks sufficient information to diagnose the problem. Describe your problem in more detail or include a minimal example in the question itself." – user2357112, mhlester, senshin, Dimitri M
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Where does x come from? Full stack trace? Also as you never break your loop, you will always enter the else. –  Hyperboreus Feb 6 at 5:43
    
"Got one!" - got a what? What are you trying to get? What does that message mean? –  user2357112 Feb 6 at 5:49
    
How can you say that this snippet "works up until 999", if you assign the local variable x to z, before defining x itself... –  Hyperboreus Feb 6 at 5:50
    
And where does the 999 come from, anyway? Your print statement doesn't print any numbers. Can you make sure the code you post actually demonstrates the behavior your question is asking about? –  user2357112 Feb 6 at 5:58

2 Answers 2

up vote -2 down vote accepted

Use a sys.setrecursionlimit to stop the 999 from repeating forever. Here is an edited version of your code. I put a sys.argv[] as well, just for fun because I imported sys. The sys.argv[] gets the argument after you run your program like this: python myscript.py 13.5 In this, sys.argv[1] is 13.5. I set the recursion limit pretty high, but the downfall of this is that the Segmentation Fault: 22 still occurs, and I haven't found a way to get rid of that.

import time
import sys
while True:
    try:
        var = int(sys.argv[1])
        break
    except IndexError:
        print 'You have to enter a number!'
        var = int(raw_input('Enter a number: '))
        break

def check(x):
    z = x
    try:
        while z != 1:
            if isEven(z) == True:
                z = z/2
                print z
            else:
                z = (3*z)+1
                print z


        else:
            print 'Got one!'
            x = x+1
            print 'Trying for %d...' %(x)
            check(x)
    except:
        print 'You were at number %d' %(x)
        check(x)

def isEven(number):
        return number % 2 == 0

sys.setrecursionlimit(10000000)
check(var)
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2  
The OP's posted code isn't even recursive. Do you have access to a more representative version of the OP's code? –  user2357112 Feb 6 at 5:59
1  
Also, sys.setrecursionlimit is not a solution to stack overflows. Unless you know exactly what you're doing, it just turns a Python stack overflow into a C stack overflow. The correct fix for recursion limit problems is generally to use an iterative solution. –  user2357112 Feb 6 at 6:01
    
Well, it worked for me! :) –  user3268208 Feb 6 at 6:08
    
This is funny. Even if the Collatz conjecture were false, THIS program would never find the proof... –  Hyperboreus Feb 6 at 6:16

Here's a cleaner version:

def collatz(x):
    yield x
    while x > 1:
        if x & 1:
            # x is odd
            x = 3*x + 1
            yield x
        # x is now even
        x //= 2
        yield x

def main():
    for x in xrange(2, 5000):
        print('-'*20)
        print(','.join(str(c) for c in collatz(x)))

if __name__=="__main__":
    main()
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