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In the Factory Method Design pattern of GoF, I can see that there is no parameter accepted by the FactoryMethod() method. My understanding is that the FactoryMethod should be passed a parameter that will be used in the switch case and then based upon the value in the switch case, different class objects are instantiated and returned back to the caller. My questions in summary are as follows:

1) Should I implement factory method pattern, exactly in the same way defined by GoF. I am also referring to UML diagram given at www.dofactory.com for Factory Method pattern).

2) Why is the factory method pattern of GoF not shown accepting parameter?

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2 Answers

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1) Should I implement factory method pattern, exactly in the same way defined by GoF. I am also referring to UML diagram given at www.dofactory.com for Factory Method pattern).

Do whatever makes sense to you. Patterns are just guidelines, not categorical laws of nature.

More than that, the patterns in GoF are not comprehensive. You'll find yourself discovering and implementing patterns which never appear in the book, nor even have a name. And that's a good thing.

2) Why is the factory method pattern of GoF not shown accepting parameter?

The factory method pattern is simply a special instance of a derived class. In particular, you have an abstract class with an abstract method, and any number of derived classes which implement the method. Usually, this implemented method returns some other type of object -- this is what makes it a creational pattern.

So, using the sample on DoFactory.com, the classes return a canned set of objects. Nothing in principle prevents users from passing in some parameter to the factory method.

My understanding is that the FactoryMethod should be passed a parameter that will be used in the switch case and then based upon the value in the switch case, different class objects are instantiated and returned back to the caller.

You can certainly implement it that way if that makes sense to you.

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2) Why is the factory method pattern of GoF not shown accepting parameter?

In object-oriented programming, your methods should do one clearly-defined thing. Passing in some kind of value to switch on is called "alternate cohesion": instead the method should be into multiple methods, one for each case. For example:

createVeggie(veggieType)

would be split into

createBroccoli()
createCelery()
createCollaredGreens()

This makes your class interface cleaner, promotes easier modification, and improves compile-time checking.

Also, be careful that you are not violating Factory Method's intent: it is actually to avoid having calling code know which object is created. As Juliet says, you may implement something like this, but then it's no longer GoF Factory Method and does not have the same advantages.

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