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I have a function in JavaScript that rounds numbers.

function roundNumber(num){
    var result = Math.round(num*100)/100;
    return result;
}

alert(roundNumber(5334.5));

//I still get 5334.5 when normally I should get 5335

What am I missing?

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/HwvX2/

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You're dividing the result by 100. Why are you expecting that to be an integer? – Bugs Feb 6 '14 at 11:26
    
Your function is a way to truncate to 2 decimal places, but you are expecting to get it to round to the nearest whole number. Bit of a logical error here. – Paddy Feb 6 '14 at 11:28
    
You appear to be using code from stackoverflow.com/questions/11832914/… which rounds to two decimal places – Ruskin Feb 6 '14 at 11:30
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try to use:

function roundNumber(num){
    var result = Math.round(num);
    return result;
}

alert(roundNumber(5334.5));
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1  
Directly using Math.round() makes more sense to me... just saying. – simone Feb 6 '14 at 11:28
    
Thanks, this is working fine! – Mando Madalin Feb 6 '14 at 11:29
    
Agry, but: may be it's just a part of function... – Dima Pog Feb 6 '14 at 11:29

Try this

alert(Math.round(5334.5));

Demo

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The answer is correct. You are in effect rounding to 2 decimal places. Should be:

Math.round(num);
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I think this is one of those times where you want to override the default behaviour, Math.round is a great method but sometimes that wheel just isn't round enough. Here's what you could do:

Math.round = function (x) {
      if (parseInt((x + 0.5).toString().split(".")[0], 10) > parseInt(x.toString().split(".")[0], 10)) {
              return parseInt((x + 1).toString().split(".")[0], 10);
       } else {
              return parseInt(x.toString().split(".")[0], 10);
      }
};
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Use right brackets :

 var result = Math.round(num);

Demo : http://jsbin.com/tibo/1/

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2  
Why do you multiply by 100 and then divide by 100? – Danilo Valente Feb 6 '14 at 11:27
1  
@DaniloValente : OP's original question.. I just copied the same.. Need a coffeee.. arg..:) – Roy M J Feb 6 '14 at 11:28

should be Math.round((num*100)/100)

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(num*100)/100 = num – Bugs Feb 6 '14 at 11:27

Just modify your codes with this line ::

       var result = Math.round(num);
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