Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I come from a Python background, where at any point in my code I can add

import pdb; pdb.set_trace()

and at runtime I'll be dropped into an interactive interpreter at that spot. Is there an equivalent for scala, or is this not possible at runtime?

share|improve this question
5  
In the spirit of "truth in advertising," Scala has no interpreter. Its REPL is "compile-and-go." That said, the REPL code (including the compiler) can be incorporated into your application, if you wish (as shown below) –  Randall Schulz Jan 29 '10 at 15:41
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 55 down vote accepted

Yes, you can, on Scala 2.8. Note that, for this to work, you have to include the scala-compiler.jar in your classpath. If you invoke your scala program with scala, it will be done automatically (or so it seems in the tests I made).

You can then use it like this:

import scala.tools.nsc.Interpreter._

object TestDebugger {
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    0 to 10 foreach { i =>
      breakIf(i == 5, DebugParam("i", i))
      println(i)
    }
  }
}

You may pass multiple DebugParam arguments. When the REPL comes up, the value on the right will be bound to a val whose name you provided on the left. For instance, if I change that line like this:

      breakIf(i == 5, DebugParam("j", i))

Then the execution will happen like this:

C:\Users\Daniel\Documents\Scala\Programas>scala TestDebugger
0
1
2
3
4
j: Int

scala> j
res0: Int = 5

You continue the execution by typing :quit.

You may also unconditionally drop into REPL by invoking break, which receives a List of DebugParam instead of a vararg. Here's a full example, code and execution:

import scala.tools.nsc.Interpreter._

object TestDebugger {
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    0 to 10 foreach { i =>
      breakIf(i == 5, DebugParam("j", i))
      println(i)
      if (i == 7) break(Nil)
    }
  }
}

And then:

C:\Users\Daniel\Documents\Scala\Programas>scalac TestDebugger.scala

C:\Users\Daniel\Documents\Scala\Programas>scala TestDebugger
0
1
2
3
4
j: Int

scala> j
res0: Int = 5

scala> :quit
5
6
7

scala> j
<console>:5: error: not found: value j
       j
       ^

scala> :quit
8
9
10

C:\Users\Daniel\Documents\Scala\Programas>
share|improve this answer
2  
This may lead to an error scala.tools.nsc.MissingRequirementError: object scala not found. in Scala 2.8. You may need to explicitly pass the classpath of the host process to the Settings of Scalac, but break and breakIf don't do this. Here's a patched version of break that does: gist.github.com/290632 –  retronym Jan 30 '10 at 17:14
    
@retronym Funny, it just worked here. Send it to paulp. He mentioned this thing was going to be changed anyway. –  Daniel C. Sobral Jan 30 '10 at 18:37
    
I tried it from a JUnit test, run by IntelliJ. IntelliJ launched the process with java -classpath .... I guess if you use scala -classpath instead it would work fine. –  retronym Jan 30 '10 at 18:48
3  
It was a dependency of the module, and hence in the classpath. 2.8 doesn't pass the contents of java -classpath of the host process to the settings for scalac: old.nabble.com/… –  retronym Feb 1 '10 at 6:27
1  
@Huur See answer by Răzvan Panda. –  Daniel C. Sobral Oct 28 '13 at 17:51
show 11 more comments

To add to Daniel's answer, as of Scala 2.9, the break and breakIf methods are contained in scala.tools.nsc.interpreter.ILoop. Also, DebugParam is now NamedParam.

share|improve this answer
    
You will need to add jline as a dependency. –  schmmd Dec 9 '11 at 1:47
3  
can you please write an example with the new usage? –  Will Apr 23 '13 at 22:03
add comment

As of Scala 2.10 both break and breakIf have been removed from ILoop.

To break into interpreter you will have to work with ILoop directly.

First add scala compiler library. For Eclipse Scala, right click on project => Build Path => Add Libraries... => Scala Compiler.

And then you can use the following where you want to start the interpreter:

import scala.tools.nsc.interpreter.ILoop
import scala.tools.nsc.interpreter.SimpleReader
import scala.tools.nsc.Settings

val repl = new ILoop
repl.settings = new Settings
repl.settings.Yreplsync.value = true
repl.in = SimpleReader()
repl.createInterpreter()

// bind any local variables that you want to have access to
repl.intp.bind("row", "Int", row)
repl.intp.bind("col", "Int", col)

// start the interpreter and then close it after you :quit
repl.loop()
repl.closeInterpreter()

In Eclipse Scala the interpreter can be used from the Console view:

share|improve this answer
4  
That's horrible. :( –  Daniel C. Sobral Oct 28 '13 at 17:50
    
@Daniel Why is that horrible? –  Huur Oct 28 '13 at 19:08
3  
Because it adds a lot of boiler-plate which is completely unrelated to the goal of debugging at a point in the program, and, instead, related to the mechanics of getting the REPL going. –  Daniel C. Sobral Oct 29 '13 at 0:48
1  
Completely backup Daniel's point of view :( –  lab419 Dec 30 '13 at 9:50
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.