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I use only jQuery for writing JavaScript code. One thing that confuses me is these two approaches of writing functions,

First approach

vote = function (action,feedbackId,responseDiv)
{
    alert('hi');
    return feedbackId;
}

Second approach

function vote(action, feedbackId,responseDiv)
{
    alert('hi');
    return feedbackId;
}

What is the difference between the two and why should one use the first approach or the second approach?

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3  
Unless vote has already been declared, vote = function (action,feed... should be var vote = function (action,feed...—it's bad practice to use implied globals. –  Steve Harrison Jan 29 '10 at 7:21
1  

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The first is a function expression assigned to the vote variable, the second is a function declaration.

The main difference is that function statements are evaluated at parse time, they are available before its declaration at runtime.

See also:

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Thanks CMS :) :) –  Gaurav Sharma Jan 29 '10 at 7:12
    
The first link is dead. –  Platinum Azure Apr 2 '12 at 20:25
    
@PlatinumAzure, thanks I've updated the link to the article. –  CMS Apr 2 '12 at 21:04
function myFunction() {}

...is called a "function declaration".

var myFunction = function() {};

...is called a "function expression".

They're very similar; however:

  • The function declaration can be declared after it is referenced, whereas the function expression must be declared before it is referenced:

    // OK
    myFunction();
    function myFunction() {}
    
    
    // Error
    myFunction();
    var myFunction = function() {};
    
  • Since a function expression is a statement, it should be followed by a semi-colon.

See Function constructor vs. function declaration vs. function expression at the Mozilla Developer Centre for more information.

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The function declaration syntax cannot be used within a block statement.

Legal:

function a() {
    function b() {

    }
}

Illegal:

function a() {
    if (c) {
        function b() {

        }
    }
}

You can do this though:

function a() {
    var b;
    if (c) {
        b = function() {

        };
    }
}
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The first one is a function expression,

var calculateSum = function(a, b) { return a + b; }

alert(calculateSum(5, 5)); // Alerts 10

The second one is a plain function declaration.

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