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Interesting little bug here:

if (host != NULL) {
    printf("hi");
} else {
    printf("FAIL");
}
return 0;

doesn't print anything at all, but:

if (host != NULL) {
    printf("hi");
} else {
    printf("FAIL");
}   
fprintf(stdout, "\n%s\n", (char *)&additionalargs);
return 0;

prints

hi

abc

Does anyone know why this is?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The difference is the \n characters.

As you printf characters, they are accumulated in a buffer which isn't sent to the output device until an 'end of line' character is sent.

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works, thank you. –  piggles Jan 29 '10 at 7:20
2  
It doesn't have to be end of line. Otherwise, there'd be no way to output and receive input on a single line. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 29 '10 at 7:22
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printf output to stdout is buffered. You might want to look at fflush

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I was thinking something along those lines (ie printf is buffered). I've only been at C for a week now. –  piggles Jan 29 '10 at 7:22
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try using fflush(stdout) before your if condition.

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2  
wouldn't I want that AFTER my if condition? man fflush says that fflush() forces a write on whatever output stream is given as an argument. –  piggles Jan 29 '10 at 7:23
    
to get exact output, better would be place fflush both before and after if condition, otherwise previous existent data of buffer may also be printed out. –  Manav Jan 29 '10 at 7:28
1  
it is going to be printed out anyway. fflush() before if isn't going to magically make the previous unprinted data go away! –  Alok Singhal Jan 29 '10 at 7:35
    
How does adding just a '\n' in printf magically prints the buffer. I guess, (and sorry for guessing ;lol) '\n' traditionally acted like line feed and made the buffer flush before printing a new line. –  Manav Jan 29 '10 at 7:45
1  
Manav, on many systems, stdout is line buffered. Which means that printing a newline character flushes the buffer (or if the buffer becomes full). However, if you really want your output to be visible at certain points, you should call fflush(stdout); after doing any printing that doesn't involve newline. –  Alok Singhal Jan 29 '10 at 7:50
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