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In git, I stash away my changes. Is it possible that I can create a patch with what I stash away? And the apply that patch in some other repository (my co-worker's)?

I know 'git format-patch -1' but I think that is for what I have committed. But I am looking for the same thing for changes I stashed away?

And how can I apply a patch in other repository?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 50 down vote accepted

Sure, git stash show supports this:

git stash show -p
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1  
I have a related question about apply a patch. Let's say my patch touches multiple files. Is there a way to apply the patch 'interactively'? Pick which files of the patch I should apply the patch against? Can I do that? –  silverburgh Jan 30 '10 at 1:43
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@silverburgh: I had a quick look through man patch and I didn't see any options for interactive patch application. However, since patch files are plain text files themselves, usually what one would do is edit the patch in a text editor to clip out the relevant parts to apply with patch. Alternately, if you're applying the patch into another Git repository, you could apply it all and then selectively git checkout files that you didn't want to change (git checkout with a filename throws away unstaged changes). –  Greg Hewgill Jan 30 '10 at 2:08
    
@silverburgh you can restrict the set of files patched using the "--exclude" and "--include" params of git apply. –  Kelvin Aug 16 '11 at 19:24
    
@silverburgh you can do the following assume you have a patch. apply the patch fully and then do git add --interactive ${YOUR_FILES} and it will give you the chance to partially commit. –  Alex Feb 8 '13 at 13:18
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the result will not look like a format patch! –  Alex Jul 14 at 8:00

Use

$> git stash list
stash@{0}: WIP on master: 84fx31c Merged with change to /public/
stash@{1}: WIP on master: 463yf85 FlupResource: also takes json as a query parameter

to get a list of your recently stashed stuff. Git actually creates commit objects when you stash.

They are commits like everything else. You can check them out in a branch:

$> git checkout -b with_stash stash@{0}

You can then publish this branch and you colleague can merge or cherry-pick that commit.

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Above solutions won't work for binary data. The following add support for it:

git stash show stash@{0} -p --binary

Edit

Note: I just wanted to add a comment to above replies but my reputation is not sufficient.

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