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In Perl before 5.10 there is no "state" declaration.

I've come across an example of creating static variables in these Perls: my $x if 0. The if 0 conditional makes the variable act like a static variable:

use strict; use warnings;
add() for 1..7;

sub add {
    my @arr = () if 0;

    push @arr, '+';
    print @arr, "\n";
}

prints:

+
++
+++
++++
+++++
++++++
+++++++

Is this behaviour consistent in all versions of Perl before 5.10?

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1  
Well, not the versions before Perl 5.0 :) –  brian d foy Jan 29 '10 at 20:10
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3 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I've always used scoping braces to create static variables.

add() for 1..2;       # Append to existing.
add('foo', 'bar');    # Re-initialize if args are passed.
add() for 1..2;       # Append to existing.
{
    my @arr;
    sub add {
        @arr = @_ if @_;
        push @arr, '+';
        print @arr, "\n";
    }
}
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The behavior of my $x if 0 is a bug. It has survived for a long time because it's useful and thus used; fixing it would break existing code. It's consistent and could therefore be considered usable but that doesn't mean you should do so. This "feature" has been deprecated and issues a warning as of 5.10:

Deprecated use of my() in false conditional

Even if you can't use state (i.e your code needs to be able to run under versions of Perl prior to 5.10) the my $x if 0 trick is just laziness. Use a closure otherwise:

{
    my $x;
    sub counter {
        $x = '1' unless defined $x;
        print $x++, "\n";
    }
}
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my $x = undef if 0; doesn't issue a warning though. –  eugene y Oct 8 '10 at 10:25
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No, it's very crummy. Use a closure instead.

use strict;

sub add {
    my @arr;

    return sub {
        push @arr, '+';
        print @arr, "\n";
    }
}

my $iter = add();
$iter->() for 1..7;
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1  
Saying "No" implies that the trick is not usable before 5.10, when in fact it is a usable bug/feature before 5.10 that the state keyword was introduced to fix. –  Chris Lutz Jan 29 '10 at 20:12
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