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Can we use any other TAG in <ul> along with <li>?

like

<ul>
Some text here or <p>Some text here<p> etc
<li>item 1</li>
Some text here or <p>Some text here<p> etc
<li>item 1</li>
</ul>
share|improve this question
1  
What are you trying to achieve with this? I could understand it if you were using <ol> and trying to get a list continuation, but there doesn't seem to be any point putting a paragraph inside an unordered list wrapper (as well as it being invalid, obv). – bobince Jan 29 '10 at 11:24
up vote 32 down vote accepted

For your code to be valid you can't put any tag inside a <ul> - it has to be directly followed by an <li>.

You can however, put any block level element inside the <li>, like so:

<ul>
        <li>
            <h2>...</h2>
            <p>...</p>
            <p>...</p>
        </li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
What about script, noscript, ev. ins and del? I want to mark some intervals with something that is not really rendered, but that may put into ul. – user1046334 Feb 22 '13 at 10:12
    
@Jonny : Thanks... – Mark Mar 19 '13 at 4:41
    
@herby : Why not put it after the <ul>?? – Jonny Haynes Mar 19 '13 at 9:28
    
@JonnyHaynes: I want something for marking begin and end of the interval. For example a range of lis inside ul. I have used empty <script>s and it works for me. – user1046334 Mar 19 '13 at 19:23

According to the W3C Recommendation, the basic structure of a list must be:

<UL>
   <LI> ... first list item...
   <LI> ... second list item...
   ...
</UL>

You can put p tags only inside of li tags, not as direct children of ul. The W3C Recommendation expressly states:

lists are made up of sequences of list items defined by the LI element

share|improve this answer

While you could have other tags inside (and it might work just fine), you shouldn't because it's not w3c-compliant. It also makes very little semantic sense.

Just create a simple page and run it throught the validator ( http://validator.w3.org/ ) and you'll see for yourself :)

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No, this would be invalid markup. However, if you're trying to achieve a different look and feel for some of the lines, you can do this by adding a specific classname to any li tag instead. See below:

<ul>
    <li class="foobar">Label</li>
    <li>Some text here</li>
    <li>Some text here</li>
    <li class="foobar">Label</li>
    <li>Some text here</li>
    <li>Some text here</li>
</ul>
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No. If it's list, it has list-items in it. I can't see any use for list with non-list-items in it; it's not list...

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You can write such mark up but you shouldn't as it is non-compliant and you may get strange and unexpected results in different browsers.

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if your doing this to style a part of the list-element, you could do this

<ul>
  <li>normal text <span>bold text</span></li>
  <li>normal text <span>bold text</span></li>
</ul>

and then use the CSS

ul li {font-size: 12px; font-weight: normal;}
ul li span {font-size: 12px; font-weight: bold;}

hope this helps

share|improve this answer
1  
Downvote: Why use a span with font-weight: bold; when you could easily and more importantly, it'll be more semantic to use the <strong> tag. – Jonny Haynes Mar 19 '13 at 9:30
    
@JonnyHaynes: that's just an example, no need to downvote the answer for that reason. – bfred.it Jun 21 '13 at 1:58

You can use template tag and it is totally legal. For example:

<ul>
**<template>**Some text here or <p>Some text here<p> etc**</template>**
<li>item 1</li>
**<template>**Some text here or <p>Some text here<p> etc**</template>**
<li>item 1</li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer

Knockout.js specific answer, you can use the following comment syntax.

<ul>
    <li class="header">Header item</li>
    <!-- ko foreach: myItems -->
        <li>Item <span data-bind="text: $data"></span></li>
    <!-- /ko -->
</ul>

<script type="text/javascript">
    ko.applyBindings({
        myItems: [ 'A', 'B', 'C' ]
    });
</script>
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