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I have an issue with git and my terminal.

Here's a gallery to show you my issue : http://imgur.com/a/6RrEY

When I push commits from my terminal, git says I push them with another username, that's a user from my organisation (my company) with no commit at all and it seems it belongs to no one : (check gallery first pic)

But this doesn't happen when I use Github for mac, in the feed I see the commits pushed by myself.

The problem also affects my personal repositories, my terminal says that I don't have the permission to push commits on those repositories (which is obviously wrong) since it tries to push it with this user : (check gallery second pic)

Guess what ? This doesn't happen with Github for mac too.

I changed my computer to a brand new one few days ago, so I reset'ed all my ssh key of github and left only a new one generated by Github for Mac so I don't think that there's some ghost user/ssh key hidden somewhere, this hdd is brand new : (check gallery third pic)

My .gitconfig file is all clear, there's only my credentials : (check gallery fourth pic)

I really don't get it, help, StackOverflow, you're my only hope.

(My apologies for my poor Gimp skills and the Star Wars reference)

EDIT : ssh-add -l only shows the good ssh key created by github for mac and I have only one github account

EDIT2 : ssh -T git@github.com recognize me as the good user.

EDIT3 : After a few tests it looks like my terminal does the commits with my username, but pushes them with the other one, Github for mac commits and pushes with the good username.This situation happen with every repo I have/make (even new ones).

EDIT4 : In a personal repository git log --pretty="%h %an %ae" shows my good username

EDIT5 : No sign of environment variables that would override my credentials in my env. Even if I try to set those variables with the good credentials problem persists.

EDIT6 : Things work back normally if I force the user in the path of /.git/config of a repository but I don't think that's the good option : http://USER@github.com/USER/REPO.git

EDIT7 : We deleted the git user that pushed the commits for me and this brings another error : remote: Invalid username or password. fatal: Authentication failed for 'https://github.com/USER/REPO.git/'

FINAL EDIT : I installed git with homebrew, typed git config --global push.default simple and now it takes my credentials even without forceing the user. That's strange. Thanks everybody for your help, you're great guys !

share|improve this question
    
check ~/.gitconfig and $project_root/.git/config files. One of those two is surely misconfigured for user name. – mu 無 Feb 6 '14 at 22:31
    
Thanks for your answer ansh0l. ~/.gitconfig is clear and so is $project_root/.git/config. In fact I have this issue with every personal project, work projects can be pushed since this other user belongs to my organisation that owns those repositories. – Yinfei Feb 6 '14 at 22:34
    
Do you have multiple github accounts then? One for company, the other for personal usage? – mu 無 Feb 6 '14 at 22:36
    
Nope, only one for everything. – Yinfei Feb 6 '14 at 22:36
    
An annoying solution would be to just regenerate another SSH key. If you are using your current SSH key with another service it would be pointless. – Eduardo Bautista Feb 6 '14 at 22:40

I just had this problem at work. The builtin git that ships with mac or comes when you install xcode caches git credentials in keychain. The fix for me was to:

start keychain access (start spotlight via cmd + space, type keychain, press enter)

Under keychains on the upper left, select "login" Under category on the left, select "passwords"

find the name "github" and delete it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that input :) – Yinfei Jun 11 '14 at 7:38
    
Thank you very much! – Joe Aspara Nov 26 '14 at 14:35
    
Make sure you delete all github entry here & set the login configuration *git config --global user.name <name> *git config --global user.email <email> – Shank_Transformer Mar 9 '15 at 8:07
    
In my case, SourceTree was experiencing this problem. Deleting the item in the keychain fixed it! – Shoerob May 1 '15 at 19:00
    
Life saver , spent an hour before trying this +1 – Aman Virk Aug 24 '15 at 17:08

it looks like my terminal does the commits with my username, but pushes them with the other one

Author and committer name and email (which are important for GitHub) are derived from:

git config user.name
git config user.email

However, as mentioned in git config and git commit-tree, those values can be overridden by environment variables:

GIT_AUTHOR_NAME
GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL
GIT_COMMITTER_NAME
GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL

So double-check those variables.

Things work back normally if I force the user in the .git/config of a repository but I don't think that's the good option.

But it should be a good solution.
When using an https url, I always specify the user in it to make sure the authentication is done with the right user.

http://USER@github.com/USER/REPO.git
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply VonC ! Unfortunately, my git configcredentials are right and there's no environnement variables set in my /username/.bashrc file... – Yinfei Feb 7 '14 at 9:36
    
@Yinfei84 nonetheless, check your 'env' output. – VonC Feb 7 '14 at 9:41
    
No sign of those variables there too... – Yinfei Feb 7 '14 at 9:47
    
@Yinfei84 what would happen if (to test it out) you set those variables explicitly, and try a commit and a push. Would that work better then? – VonC Feb 7 '14 at 10:43
    
I just did it and the problem persists. – Yinfei Feb 7 '14 at 10:52
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Despite all the great options given by other users, the only way to fix this was to reinstall git completely and type git config --global push.default simple to rewrite good credentials.

share|improve this answer
    
That seems simpler than my answer. +1 – VonC Mar 12 '14 at 8:47
    
@VonC, despite your answer was great, it didn't work at all. This is the only solution that worked for me. I wonder if it's git issue or OSX... – wilgosz.pl Mar 25 at 7:05

If you are using MAC, then go to Keychain Access and remove the entry of the user for which you don't want git access.

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